Mike Boessen's Radio Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2018"

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Atwater Kent 185 (1934)

Atwater Kent 185 (1934)

If Art Deco is your thing, here is what you've been waiting for. Atwater Kent went whole hog, mad dog Art Deco on this very striking model 185 from 1934. Easily one of the more unique and eye-catching radios I have ever seen. The black trimmed cabinet is faced with beautiful bias cut veneers, and accentuated with brass and aluminum inlays. Due to its design, the cabinet on this radio was extremely difficult to refinish. While not absolutely perfect, I think it is a stunning example of this model. It has a large 8-inch speaker, a good set of tubes, all new capacitors, resistors as necessary, almost all new wiring and a full alignment. Some idiot soldered the Vernier shaft to the external shaft and I was not able to fix that, so the tuning is a straight 180° rotation. The dial is a reproduction. Broadcast and short wave. This radio is very heavy, so will be a little expensive to ship, but I'm pretty sure once you get your hands on it you won't mind. It is just a downright spectacular radio. 15"H x 13"W x 8"D. $499.00. (1680037)

 

Crosley 167 Cathedral (1934)

Crosley 167 Cathedral (1934)

Compared to other low budget, depression era, five-tube mini-cathedrals of its day, this little 1934 Crosley 167 is a real stand-out both in looks and performance. The front is very eye-catching, incorporating several types of veneer applied in layers with attractive inlaid features. The overall effect is very beautiful. I think it is one of the prettiest mini cathedrals ever made. This restoration was started by a dear friend who had to retire due to health reasons. I did my best to preserve as much of his work as I could. There are a few minor defects in the finish, but I did not want to strip it and undo all of his beautiful work. The chassis has been completely restored with all new caps and resistors as needed. A full alignment has been done. Receiver sensitivity is quite good and surprising for a little five-tuber. All in all, a very unique and attractive little set. The tube shields in the rear view photo are not Crosley. Proper Crosley tube shields have been installed since the picture was taken. $395.00. (1680014)

 

Detrola 302 Clock Radio (1939)

Detrola 302 Clock Radio (1939)

Check out this highly sought after little Detrola 302 clock radio straight from the motor city. Detrola really knocked it out of the park with this elegant and simple little set. The finish is absolutely stunning on the near-perfect cabinet. Complete chassis rebuild with all new caps and resistors. Full alignment. Reception is fair on the internal antenna but very good with an external antenna. The clock, dial glass, knobs, clock switch, speaker and grille cloth are all replacements. I repaired a couple of cracks in the rear cover but overall it is as good-looking as any. The wood is slightly darker than in these photos. I have added an audio cable for your mobile devices. I feel safe in saying you will not find a nicer looking example of this adorable little gem. 10"W x 10"H x 6"D. $549.00. (1680024)

 

General Electric GD52 (1938)

General Electric GD52 (1938)

General Electric put a lot of pizzazz into this unique and attractive little GD52 table radio. The cabinet is at once simple in design, and elegant in appearance, with extensive use of very attractive veneer. The GD52 was manufactured in 1938 and is apparently much less common than its younger cousin, the GD60, released in 1939. From what I can tell, none has ever sold on Radio Attic. This one was restored by a previous owner who by and large did a lot of very nice work. An ugly schematic diagram was pasted over the model label on the bottom of the radio. I saved as much of it as I could but it suffered quite a bit from that abuse. The graphics on the volume wheel are badly worn in the first 45° of rotation. I went through the chassis, replaced a few more components, replaced a weak tube, and gave it a full alignment. I have added an audio cable for your mobile devices. This is a very unique and attractive little radio and would be a real eye catcher on your kitchen cabinet or in your collection. 15"W x 9"H x 8"D. $225.00. (1680026)

 

General Electric H530 Micro Tombstone (1938)

NEW!

General Electric H530 Micro Tombstone (1938)

This little General Electric H530 is the epitome of the old expression "ten pounds of sugar in a five pound sack." One of the most compact tombstone radios ever made. GE mounted the chassis in an unusual vertical orientation to save space. The result is a little tombstone radio that is just as cute as it can be. I put an extremely nice finish on this little jewel, but it still has a few minor flaws. The dials, like all of these little H530s, have some of the graphics worn off, and no replacements are available. The back cover and antenna are not original. I had to make the knobs. The grille cloth is original, but I thought not bad enough to replace. Picks up local stations fairly well. External antenna connection for more distant stations. I have installed a cable for your mobile devices. All new capacitors, resistors as necessary and a good set of tubes for years of trouble-free service. I even stuffed new capacitors into the chassis mounted filter can to preserve original appearance and performance. I'm losing my shirt on this radio, but I hope you will agree that it is just too endearing to not save it. 10"H x 8"W x 6-1/2"D. $209.00. (1680039)

 

Gloritone 26 Cathedral (1931)

Gloritone 26 Cathedral (1931)

Check out this girl next door manufactured by United States Radio and Television Corporation from 1930 to 1931. Not a cheerleader, but pretty darn good looking! This radio had a nice cabinet, but the finish was badly deteriorated so I stripped it and dressed it up fit for church with 15 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. There are a few very minor flaws in the finish, but overall it is absolutely gorgeous. The dial is a little stained, and I had to fabricate a tube shield as that was missing. I modified the volume control from the lousy antenna swamping type to audio stage volume control. All the tubes test good as new. I replaced all of the capacitors, resistors as necessary and gave it a full alignment. Receiver sensitivity is quite good for a 1930 design. This is one of the nicest examples of the fairly rare Gloritone model 26 you are likely to see anywhere and would be a standout in any collection. 18"H x 15"W x 8-1/2"D; 23.31 pounds. $299.00. (1680031)

 

Harfield Mini-Cathedral (about 1933)

Harfield Mini-Cathedral (about 1933)

Here's another nifty one-of-a-kind radio sold under the brand name Harfield. As far as I can tell this is the only actual Harfield radio known to exist. There is no mention of Harfield in any of the radio literature I am aware of. The most unique feature of this set is that the dial indicator and the dial light are mounted on an arm behind the dial, and both rotate with the tuning condenser creating one of the most interesting dial indicators I have ever seen. The cabinet restoration was done by a previous owner. There are a few flaws and a little ripple in the cabinet, but all in all it presents fairly well. The speaker and grille cloth are not original. The small knob has a couple of chips in the rim, but still looks pretty good. All new capacitors and resistors as necessary. Receiver sensitivity is excellent, and the sound is respectable. Here is your chance to own something nobody else has without breaking the bank. 14"H x 11"W x 8-1/2"D. $159.00. (1680033)

 

Knockout Regenerative Receiver (circa 1928)

Knockout Regenerative Receiver (circa 1928)

From a little off the beaten antique radio path comes this unique and interesting little Knockout regenerative receiver. During my research of this set, a vigorous discussion ensued as to whether it was a factory made radio, a kit radio, or just homemade. In any case, it really is quite a "knockout." When I got it, the original bus style wiring had been removed and replaced with modern wire. I removed all of that and rewired it with period appropriate 12 gauge bus wire with a lot of help and parts from my new friend Chas. It is fitted with a high testing UX-201A tube, and works quite well. It works well with a 4.5V to 6V "A" cell and a 24V "B" cell. This can be four "D" cells and three 9V batteries. Requires high impedance headphones of roughly 2000 ohms. For an additional $35 I will include a period appropriate set of those. I know this radio isn't for everyone, but I hope someone will take a shine to it. If you are not familiar with regenerative receivers, you should do some research before buying this set. 12"W x 8"H x 8"D. $179.00. (1680035)

 

Mitchell 1250 "Lullaby" Bed Lamp-Radio (1949)

Mitchell 1250 "Lullaby" Bed Lamp-Radio (1949)

Get a load of this adorable and practical little 1949 Mitchell 1250 Lullaby Bed Lamp-Radio. This thing is absolutely the berries. Mom would just hang this on her bed board and flip on the built-in 25 watt reading lamp while she took in a gripping romance novel. I just barely got my AM loving sweetheart to let me sell it, because it wouldn't fit on our bookcase headboard. The Bakelite cabinet is in wonderful condition. It has all the original hardware and is in nearly like new condition. The restoration was done by my good friend Bill Skaggs in Long Beach, Mississippi. I gave it a thorough check out and cleaning. It plays beautifully and picks up stations quite well on its built in antenna. Little gems like this don't come up every day. Don't get "lulled" to sleep and let it slip away! $159.00. (1680016)

 

Monarch Tombstone

Monarch Tombstone

If you are the kind of person who likes to have something nobody else has, and you don't mind not knowing what it is, this is the radio for you. All I know about this radio is that it says Monarch on the escutcheon. Manufactured by Continental Radio and Television Corporation of Chicago, Illinois, about 1935. The same radio was sold under the Admiral brand as their Continental B600. I bought this radio as part of a collection. It has an amateur restoration done by a previous owner. While it is not up to my standards it isn't too bad, and is all and all an attractive radio. There is one small crack in the speaker grille and a few less then perfect places in the staining work. The dial glass is not original. I put in a full set of good tubes and gave it a full alignment. It plays beautifully and the sound is nothing short of exceptional thanks to a pair of #43 tubes in parallel for the output stage. At 14 inches tall it is smaller than many tombstone radios. If you want to listen to some oldies on your favorite AM station you will be glad you bought this little gem. $159.00. (1680015)

 

Philco 66S Tombstone (1935)

Philco 66S Tombstone (1935)

The last of the 66 series, this very nice example of the Philco 66S is much harder to find than its more common older siblings. This one is a veteran of a previous restoration, and has a few minor mars and dings. I touched up the finish and put eight coats of lacquer over it. The result is a really quite attractive radio. Photographing these old radios is very difficult. The actual color is a little darker than what shows in these photos. All new capacitors, resistors as necessary, and a very good set of tubes have been installed for years of trouble-free service. Full alignment. The grille cloth and dial have been replaced. Unlike most five-tube radios, the shortwave is really quite good on this set. The speaker is perfect and the sound is outstanding. If you're a Philco collector I'm willing to bet you don't have one of these and I hope you will take a liking to this little gem. $299.00. (1680021)

 

Philco 89B Code 123 Cathedral (1935)

Philco 89B Code 123 Cathedral (1935)

This Philco 89B series 5 is a later version of one of Philco's longest running and most successful cathedral radios. Sometimes referred to as the "baby grand." By 1935 Philco had it right. The electronics are very well refined. The tuning is spot on all across the dial B/C and S/W. Receiver sensitivity is very good. The sound is rich and full and is better than many consoles. The finish on this radio is possibly the slickest I have ever done. It is absolutely gorgeous. The sides are actually a little darker than in my photos and match the front perfectly. As with all my Philcos, I removed both the electrolytic and the tar caps and stuffed them with new ones to maintain original look and performance. New resistors as necessary and a full alignment. A few minor veneer repairs and a new grille cloth. Unfortunately the chassis and cabinet labels are pretty much toast. Beyond that, if you buy this radio, you will have one of the nicest examples of the Philco model 89B around. $400.00. (1680023)

 

Silvertone 6405 (1939)

Silvertone 6405 (1939)

I should have thrown this radio away. Any other restorer would have. It had a piece broken out of the top, the back cover was missing, it had two bad tubes, and it is not a valuable radio. But just look at it. It is so darn cute! Reminded me of a 4'-11" cheerleader from high school named Cheryl. Despite 15 hours of hard work, my patch of the broken cover is not very good. I had to make the back cover, but it is an accurate reproduction of the original. These shiny Bakelite radios are extremely difficult to photograph. The finish on the remainder of the cabinet is very nice, and looks like a brown Bakelite walnut tinted cabinet should look. The front and top photos are reasonably close color wise. All new capacitors and resistors and a full alignment. Picks up local stations on its internal antenna, but has an external antenna connection for more distant stations. I'm going to lose my shirt on this radio. Somebody please prove I was right to save it. Come on. You know you love it. 8"W x 5-1/2"H x 5"D. $159.00. (1680032)

 

Telefunken Concertino 8 (1958)

NEW!

Telefunken Concertino 8 (1958)

The quality and performance of Telefunken electronics is the stuff of legends, and, having restored this Concertino 8, I am now a true believer. What an amazing radio! This is a very large radio, and I don't even know what classification it falls into, but Telefunken did not waste the space. They stuffed it with two huge 6x9-inch woofers, and two 4-inch tweeters. The electronics are extremely sophisticated, and the sound is awe-inspiring. One of the more ingenious touches is an AM antenna that can be rotated with a knob on the front of the radio, eliminating the old problem with internal antennas of having to turn your radio to face the station you want to receive. Tuning eye tube. Three AM bands and FM from 88 MHz to 100 MHz. AM and FM antenna, phono and tape inputs. The grille cloth is a little stained and there are a few dings in the gold trim. A few minor imperfections in the otherwise gorgeous cabinet. One of the side speaker grilles I had to make. On the advice of an actual German technician I did not do a full recap. All Telefunken tubes except for the tuning eye. If you buy this radio you are going to be amazed. Fairly heavy. 24"W x 15"H x 11"D. $450.00. (1680038)

 

Tunette Mantel Radio (1933)

Tunette Mantel Radio (1933)

Aside from being downright adorable, this little guy has to hold the title of the most lonesome radio in the world. The best I can tell, it is the only surviving radio of this brand in existence. The brand name and model were stamped on the back cover in ink and most of it is no longer readable. It is also apparently the only TRF receiver ever manufactured with this tube complement. The cabinet has a few minor dings but is all in all very nice. This is a very stout, well-made little radio with a cabinet of solid wood. New grille cloth. A full set of very good tubes. All new resistors and capacitors, and a full alignment. Reception is fairly good for a 1933 budget TRF, and the sound is not bad for a little mantel radio. If you are the kind of person who would like to own the only one in the world, this is your radio. I think it would be great if someone would give this lonely little fellow a good home. If you have any knowledge about this radio or the company that made it would you please contact me. 12"W x 8"H x 6"D. $249.00. (1680028)

 

Zenith 5D011Z Consoltone (1946)

Zenith 5D011Z Consoltone (1946)

Offered for sale is a nifty little Zenith Consoltone 5D011Z table radio from 1946. This is a really swell little set with surprisingly good sound and decent reception on its internal antenna. The cabinet is in very nice condition, with all original knobs and grille cloth. It has been fully recapped and resistors as needed, and fully aligned. The only thing not original is the power indicator lens, which I had to fabricate, as none were available. The sound is surprisingly rich for a small table set, hence the name "Consoltone." You won't regret owning this little gem. It doesn't take up much space on the counter top and will keep you entertained in the kitchen, just as it did for Mom and Dad, after he got home from the second "war to end all wars." $139.00. (1680006)
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