Mike Boessen's Radio Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2018"

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Acme 1500 Tape Recorder

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Acme 1500 Tape Recorder

Next up on the shelf clearing project is this really cute little Acme 1500 tape recorder. This is a very well-made little guy, and very well preserved. Someone took very good care of this. According to research I have done, it is the same as a Homey HR408A, which I presume is the original manufacturer. The tape runs forward and rewind, but there is a little dimple in the tires from sitting for a long time. I can tell you that a tone injected on the tape head leads comes out the speaker, so I think the amplifier works. The tape head appears to read continuity through it. I cannot get it to play or record anything. The original microphone is included but I believe it is bad. I suspect a small electret microphone could be installed in it. I am selling it "as is" with no warranty. I found one instance of one of these selling for $125 on an auction site. I'm hoping someone with more expertise than mine could get it working. It's just too nice to throw away. 7-1/2" x 6" x 2-1/2". $25.00. (1680062)

 

Atwater Kent 20 (1924)

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Atwater Kent 20 (1924)

Okay. Time to make room on the shelves. First up is an Atwater Kent model 20 from about 1924. I don't know if this is the "big box" model or not. It is definitely a parts radio, or a serious fixer-upper. No tubes. The wiring is pretty sad. I think a couple of the interstage transformers might be okay, the third one apparently not. The cabinet appears to be original finish, not too bad for 1924. This radio is being sold "as is!" Come on. Help me get the shelves cleaned off. 19-3/4"W x 7"H x 6"D. $50.00. (1680058)

 

Atwater Kent 30 (1925?)

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Atwater Kent 30 (1925?)

Next up in the shelf clearing project is a very nice, unrestored Atwater Kent model 30. For a radio made in 1925 the apparently original finish on this cabinet is exceptional. Actual color is somewhat darker than the camera made it. No tubes. To the best of my ability, the interstage transformers seem good, but no guarantees. The wiring looks very good. This is a very nice condition, very restorable radio. This radio is being sold as-is with no warranty. 19-3/4"W x 7-1/2"H x 6-1/4"D. $75.00. (1680059)

 

Atwater Kent 185 (1934)

Atwater Kent 185 (1934)

If Art Deco is your thing, here is what you've been waiting for. Atwater Kent went whole hog, mad dog Art Deco on this very striking model 185 from 1934. Easily one of the more unique and eye-catching radios I have ever seen. The black trimmed cabinet is faced with beautiful bias cut veneers, and accentuated with brass and aluminum inlays. Due to its design, the cabinet on this radio was extremely difficult to refinish. While not absolutely perfect, I think it is a stunning example of this model. It has a large 8-inch speaker, a good set of tubes, all new capacitors, resistors as necessary, almost all new wiring and a full alignment. Some idiot soldered the Vernier shaft to the external shaft and I was not able to fix that, so the tuning is a straight 180° rotation. The dial is a reproduction. Broadcast and short wave. This radio is very heavy, so will be a little expensive to ship, but I'm pretty sure once you get your hands on it you won't mind. It is just a downright spectacular radio. 15"H x 13"W x 8"D. $499.00. (1680037)

 

Brunswick International Table Radio (1933)

Brunswick International Table Radio (1933)

My latest example of antique radio obscurity is this little Brunswick International table radio from the Bill Skaggs collection. This little cutie is totally unknown in the radio literature. The chassis is identical to the Empire Electrical Products model 40. According to the label, Brunswick international heralded from New York, New York. The veneer on the front is very striking, and the cabinet overall is in very nice shape with one minor ding in the top left and a few other very minor blemishes. For a low budget radio, I went crazy and put a very nice finish on this set. There is a chip out of the small knob. I replaced all of the capacitors and most of the resistors and gave it a good set of tubes for long service life. Auxiliary input cable for your mobile devices. All in all a sweet little radio for someone who wants to have the only one currently known to exist. 12"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. $229.00. (1680040)

 

Gloritone 26 Cathedral (1931)

Gloritone 26 Cathedral (1931)

Check out this girl next door manufactured by United States Radio and Television Corporation from 1930 to 1931. Not a cheerleader, but pretty darn good looking! This radio had a nice cabinet, but the finish was badly deteriorated so I stripped it and dressed it up fit for church with 15 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. There are a few very minor flaws in the finish, but overall it is absolutely gorgeous. The dial is a little stained, and I had to fabricate a tube shield as that was missing. I modified the volume control from the lousy antenna swamping type to audio stage volume control. All the tubes test good as new. I replaced all of the capacitors, resistors as necessary and gave it a full alignment. Receiver sensitivity is quite good for a 1930 design. This is one of the nicest examples of the fairly rare Gloritone model 26 you are likely to see anywhere and would be a standout in any collection. 18"H x 15"W x 8-1/2"D; 23.31 pounds. $299.00. (1680031)

 

Hallicrafters S-38B (1947-1952)

Hallicrafters S-38B (1947-1952)

Hallicrafters was big in the amateur radio business for a great many years. The S-38B was their entry-level receiver in the late 40s and early 50s. Like all Hallicrafters equipment, it is well engineered and well made. Broadcast and two short wave bands, with coarse and fine tuning. I did what I could with the finish on the cabinet. It's not perfect, but pretty good for its age, and actually looks a little better than in the photographs. I gave it a full set of high testing tubes, replaced all of the capacitors, most of the resistors and gave it a full and careful alignment. I had to make the back cover as it was missing. Receiver sensitivity is very good, and the sound is not bad for a communications receiver. All in all a very sharp little radio at a decent price. 13"W x 7"H x 8"D. $199.00. (1680053)

 

Knockout Regenerative Receiver (circa 1928)

Knockout Regenerative Receiver (circa 1928)

From a little off the beaten antique radio path comes this unique and interesting little Knockout regenerative receiver. During my research of this set, a vigorous discussion ensued as to whether it was a factory made radio, a kit radio, or just homemade. In any case, it really is quite a "knockout." When I got it, the original bus style wiring had been removed and replaced with modern wire. I removed all of that and rewired it with period appropriate 12 gauge bus wire with a lot of help and parts from my new friend Chas. It is fitted with a high testing UX-201A tube, and works quite well. It works well with a 4.5V to 6V "A" cell and a 24V "B" cell. This can be four "D" cells and three 9V batteries. Requires high impedance headphones of roughly 2000 ohms. For an additional $35 I will include a period appropriate set of those. I know this radio isn't for everyone, but I hope someone will take a shine to it. If you are not familiar with regenerative receivers, you should do some research before buying this set. 12"W x 8"H x 8"D. $179.00. (1680035)

 

Philco 48-206 (1948)

Philco 48-206 (1948)

Can you say Naugahyde? That's what they called the vinyl covering on this radio back when I was a kid. Whatever you call it, it is in very nice condition on this Philco table radio from 1948. A little bit of staining on the top, but all in all quite nice. Simple, attractive in a leather kind of way, and resistant to scuffs and scratches! I replaced all the capacitors, most of the resistors, and put a good set of tubes in it. Picks up local stations on its internal antenna, but has an external antenna wire which is grounded to the back of the set but can be used if you want to get more distance. I have added a cable for your mobile devices. Not a particularly old set but fairly uncommon. A good choice if you would like to add something unique to your collection without breaking the bank. 14"W x 8"H x 7"D. $209.00. (1680041)

 

RCA 40X55 (1939)

RCA 40X55 (1939)

When my son was born my brother in law said he was just "struck all over with cute." I had to steal his description for this little RCA. It is simply "struck all over with cute!" Often referred to as the "wavy grille," the design of the front is unique, simple, yet very eye-catching. I put a lot of effort into trying to match the cherry colored tint of the original radio. I gave it a slick, gorgeous finish, with 15 coats of lacquer. There are still a few minor dings, and the dial face has a little damage in the middle. I gave it a full set of high testing tubes, replaced all the capacitors, resistors as necessary, and gave it my usual thorough alignment. Reception is quite good on the internal antenna, but there is an external antenna screw for more distant stations. The sound from the little four-inch speaker is decent at reasonable volume levels. The speaker grille cloth and knobs are not original. RCA provided a phonograph Jack on the rear panel, and I have supplied a cable so you can plug in your mobile device. Just tune the radio off channel and adjust the volume with your mobile device and front panel volume controls. All in all, it is just a darling little radio. 9"W x 8"H x 6"D. $350.00. (1680054)

 

RCA 55X (1941)

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RCA 55X (1941)

I guess World War II was in our sights already, and maybe brass was already being rationed, but, come on RCA, no escutcheon? Beyond that, this 1941 RCA 55X was a top-of-the-line AM table radio. Popular with collectors, it is one of very few in its time that had two speakers! As a result the sound quality is quite good and projects very well. Solid wood cabinet with walnut veneer front. RCA had this tinted almost black to cover up a dark spot in the solid wood top. I don't like tinting them that dark, so the flaw in the wood shows up. It doesn't look as bad as the camera made it. I gave it a full set of good tubes, replaced all the caps and resistors as necessary. Full alignment. Receiver sensitivity is good on the internal antenna, but there is a wire provided for an external antenna. I have provided a switch and a cable for your mobile devices. I had to make one of the speaker grills, the back cover, and I had to replace the veneer on the front. A nice slick finish, with 14 coats of lacquer. All in all, a fairly unique, good looking, good performing, and I think, a very cool AM radio from one of the biggest radio companies in the world. 17"W x 7-1/2"H x 6-3/4"D. $350.00. (1680056)

 

RCA X551 (1951)

RCA X551 (1951)

If you're looking to get into antique radio on the cheap, you just hit the jackpot. This plain Jane little RCA X551 is one of RCA's "Golden Throat" radios, so named as part of an ad campaign where they endeavored to maximize sound quality with superior electrical design and matching cabinets to speakers to get the best out of the radio. This one came to me in fairly sad shape. Someone had turned the knobs with paint on their fingers, and had paint all over the radio. It had a couple of cracks, which I repaired, but are not perfect. It is missing its front panel logo. I have included a cable for your mobile devices. Just remove the brown plug from the right side, plug in the cable and adjust the volume with your mobile device and volume control. I have seen these in the price guide as high as $250. This one has some shortcomings, and I am pricing it accordingly. 12"W x 9"H x 6"D. $109.00. (1680055)

 

Sears Reveille AM Travel Alarm

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Sears Reveille AM Travel Alarm

This absolutely darling little Sears Reveille transistor clock radio packs a lot of elegance in a little package. Wind up clock/alarm with your choice of bell or radio to wake you up in the morning. The cabinet is nearly pristine. There are no major dings or scratches, and the finish looks nearly new. The clock kept time for the first day I ran it. The radio has very good receiver sensitivity and decent sound for such a little radio. Comes complete with the original owners manual, and even a service manual! I have no idea what this is worth, but it looks like A million bucks to me! 7-1/4"W x 2-1/2"H x 1-3/4"D. $40.00. (1680057)

 

Silvertone 6405 (1939)

Silvertone 6405 (1939)

I should have thrown this radio away. Any other restorer would have. It had a piece broken out of the top, the back cover was missing, it had two bad tubes, and it is not a valuable radio. But just look at it. It is so darn cute! Reminded me of a 4'-11" cheerleader from high school named Cheryl. Despite 15 hours of hard work, my patch of the broken cover is not very good. I had to make the back cover, but it is an accurate reproduction of the original. These shiny Bakelite radios are extremely difficult to photograph. The finish on the remainder of the cabinet is very nice, and looks like a brown Bakelite walnut tinted cabinet should look. The front and top photos are reasonably close color wise. All new capacitors and resistors and a full alignment. Picks up local stations on its internal antenna, but has an external antenna connection for more distant stations. I'm going to lose my shirt on this radio. Somebody please prove I was right to save it. Come on. You know you love it. 8"W x 5-1/2"H x 5"D. $159.00. (1680032)

 

Stewart-Warner R104A Cathedral (1932)

Stewart-Warner R104A Cathedral (1932)

Have you ever heard of a Wunderlich tube? Neither had I until I undertook the restoration of this beautiful Stewart-Warner R104A cathedral. $75 later, I had a gleaming, NIB blue Wunderlich detector tube. These were expensive then as now, and were almost never used. This very rare R104A was one of the few AC sets to ever have one. They provide full-wave detection of the audio signal instead of the half wave detection used in most radios, providing higher output and better fidelity. The beautiful two-tone classic cathedral cabinet has a few minor flaws but is overall in gorgeous condition with twelve coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. The speaker was professionally re-coned and sounds great. I had to replace the power transformer, the grille cloth, the veneer on the sides, and I had to make the tuning knob. All new capacitors and resistors as necessary, and a full alignment. A full set of tubes that all test to new specs. Receiver sensitivity is very good. This is a very uncommon radio. Only one has ever sold on radio attic. I spent a ton of time and money restoring this set. I sure hope you, like me, will think it was worth it. 18-1/2"H x 15"W x 12"D. $825.00. (1680049)

 

Tuska 228 Regenerative Receiver (1924)

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Tuska 228 Regenerative Receiver (1924)

By the mid-1920s most AM radios were of the TRF type. Tuska went with the Regenerative design and was fairly successful with it. The Tuska 228 is considered by many to be near the pinnacle of the regens. At 97 years old, this one is in pretty nice condition. The cabinet is as I found it. For $60 additional I will refinish it. I have equipped it with four 01A tubes, three NOS and the other 80%. Receiver sensitivity is quite good for its time, and the volume is surprising for a radio of this design. The included speaker has no markings on it but works well. The two large knobs are not original. Some of the wiring is not original. I corrected a major oversight of the design and provided an on-off switch. Operating one of these is a combination of art, science, and magic. If you are not familiar with regenerative receivers, do some homework before buying this. I ran it with one 6V and five 12V gel cells (total cost about 75 bucks) and it performed well. 24"W x 7-1/2"H x 8"D. Speaker is 24"H with a 10-1/2" diameter horn. $399.00. (1680063)

 

Zenith 4-B-131 Battery Tombstone (1936)

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Zenith 4-B-131 Battery Tombstone (1936)

When you think of farm radios, you think small, flimsy cabinets, little tinny speakers and big, expensive throw away batteries. Zenith decided to lay that image to rest when they designed this gorgeous, full-sized, tombstone style 4B131. Nothing about this says Farm radio. The cabinet is stylish and elegant. It has a large 6-inch, perfect speaker, a well-designed chassis with a tone control that actually works! Unlike your average farm radio the sound is outstanding! On par with any similar AC set I have ever heard. They designed it with a vibrator like a car radio so it can run off a standard 6V car battery. You could even take it to the beach! The finish is slick and gorgeous, with a few minor dings from 80+ years of living. Fully restored chassis. New vibrator, and a full set of high testing tubes. When you look at this, don't think Farm radio. This is way better. For an extra $30 I will provide an AC supply that is nearly noiseless. 13"H x 10-1/2"W x 7-1/2"D. $399.00. (1680060)

 

Zenith 5-R-216 Cube (1937)

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Zenith 5-R-216 Cube (1937)

For an all around good looking, compact, black dial Zenith, it's hard to beat this 5R216 Cube from 1937. The five-tube chassis is well-designed and the sound from the 5-inch side mounted, perfect speaker is decent. Zenith had this tinted very dark due to some less than perfect wood on the sides. I refinished it with the same dark look. The tint of the sides and top is a little darker than the photos make it. The finish is very nice, with a few minor flaws. The chassis is fully restored with a full set of high testing tubes for long service life. New grille cloth. All in all, a very sharp little radio. 12"W x 10"H x 9-1/2"D. $399.00. (1680064)

 

Zenith 5-S-319 (1939)

Zenith 5-S-319 (1939)

Once in a great while I get my hands on one of these things, and the whole time I am restoring it, all I can think is "what a sweet little radio." This is one of those. Everything about this little 5S319 epitomizes Zenith's exceptional mastery of style, technical expertise, and quality that made them a leader in AM radio for over 50 years. One of the nicest looking and best-performing table radios I have ever restored. I see now why they are so highly prized by collectors. This one came to me in fairly sad condition. I had to do several veneer repairs, some better than others. I replaced all of the capacitors and resistors, gave it a full set of high testing tubes and a gorgeous, slick finish with 15 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. The knobs and pushbuttons are reproductions. The grille cloth is not original. I removed the dangerous 6X5 rectifier tube and replaced it with a solid-state rectifier. I will be glad to supply it with the tube type if you want, but if it shorts and burns up your transformer, I can't fix it for free. 13"W x 9"H x 7-1/2"D. $750.00. (1680051)

 

Zenith 7H921 AM/FM (1949)

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Zenith 7H921 AM/FM (1949)

Scientists have still not found the missing link in human evolution, but I have found the missing link in antique radio. The Zenith 7H921 has never sold on radio attic, but the 920 and 922 have, so this is your chance to fill that gap in your collection. The cabinet is nearly perfect on this set. The AM is outstanding and the FM is fairly good for its day. Full chassis restoration with all high testing tubes for long service life. The blotches on the front view photo are shadows from the flash. I had to make a new dial cover for it and the knobs are not original. If you want to get into antique radio but don't want to give up your favorite FM stations, here's your chance. 12"W x 7"H x 6-1/2"D. $209.00. (1680061)
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