Mike Boessen's Radio Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2018"

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Airline 62-316 (1935-36)

Airline 62-316 (1935-36)

You tend to think of Airline as low budget radios, but Chicago-based Belmont Radio Corporation built Montgomery Ward one heck of a nice radio in the 62-316. The waterfall cabinet is stylish and attractive. The radio is packed with features including broadcast and two short wave bands, a gear driven tuner with a vernier dial, brightly lit color coded dial, actual accurate tuning on all three bands, a separate RF amp for outstanding receiver sensitivity, and a fairly large, great sounding speaker. I gave it a nice slick finish with 14 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. All new capacitors, resistors as necessary, and a full set of high testing tubes for long service life. A little veneer damage on the top where someone sat a drink on it, and a small nail crack in the lower right corner. The dial pointer is not original. All in all, a gorgeous, feature packed radio that you will be proud to own. 17-1/2"W x 9-1/2"H x 8-1/2"D. $375.00. (1680074)

 

Air Castle 328? (1947)

Air Castle 328? (1947)

I purchased this radio on eBay, presuming it was an Air Castle model 328. The cabinet and chassis are identical to an Air Castle 328. The confusing part is that the rear cover is clearly stamped "Model T502." I have not been able to find any reference to that model in any of the literature. In any case, it is a very sharp little radio. I refinished the cabinet in proper ivory color. The camera made it a bit lighter than it actually is. A few minor flaws in the otherwise perfect finish. The radio came to me with a full set of Hytron tubes that all test new or better. I replaced all of the capacitors and most of the resistors. Full alignment. Receives well on the internal antenna, but has external antenna wires for more distant stations. The back cover leaves a bit to be desired, but I repaired it the best I could and left it for originality. Original grille cloth. The knobs are showing their age, but are presentable. If this is an Air Castle, it is very rare. If it is something else, it is even more rare. If rare is your thing, this is your radio. 10"W x 6-1/4"H x 5"D. $149.00. (1680078)

 

Atwater Kent 185 (1934)

Atwater Kent 185 (1934)

If Art Deco is your thing, here is what you've been waiting for. Atwater Kent went whole hog, mad dog Art Deco on this very striking model 185 from 1934. Easily one of the more unique and eye-catching radios I have ever seen. The black trimmed cabinet is faced with beautiful bias cut veneers, and accentuated with brass and aluminum inlays. Due to its design, the cabinet on this radio was extremely difficult to refinish. While not absolutely perfect, I think it is a stunning example of this model. It has a large 8-inch speaker, a good set of tubes, all new capacitors, resistors as necessary, almost all new wiring and a full alignment. The dial is a reproduction. Broadcast and short wave. This radio is very heavy, so will be a little expensive to ship, but I'm pretty sure once you get your hands on it you won't mind. It is just a downright spectacular radio. 15"H x 13"W x 8"D. $499.00. (1680037)

 

Atwater Kent 275 (1934)

Atwater Kent 275 (1934)

This very attractive Atwater Kent Model 275 puts the "period" behind the term "Art Deco." Even more rare than its big brother the 185 (one listed on my site!), none of this model has ever sold on Radio Attic. The cabinet restoration was done by a previous owner. Not as slick as my work, but very nicely done. A few minor dings and one blemish by the band switch knob are all that mar the otherwise very nice cabinet. There is a small crack in one knob, and I had to make the chassis top and the back cover. Broadcast and shortwave 1.6 to 3 MHz, but for some reason AK didn't put the shortwave band on the dial. A good set of tubes, all new caps, resistors as necessary and a full alignment. A very difficult restoration as I had to replace almost all of the wiring. I stuffed the filter box with new capacitors. The photo booth made the sides a little lighter than they actually are. If you are an Atwater Kent collector, you need this radio! I'll make you a package deal on both radios. 12"W x 8-1/2"H x 6"D. $350.00. (1680071)

 

Detrola 146 (1937)

Detrola 146 (1937)

My latest offering from the Motor City is this attractive, fairly large Detrola 146 table radio. It came to me with a previous restoration over several deep "witness marks" on the top. I was afraid to sand through the veneer, so I cleaned it up and put 15 coats of lacquer over it. A poor attempt at veneer replacement on the lower trim forced me to replace that with American Walnut. The resulting finish is slick, shiny, and gorgeous. A full set of high testing tubes, all new capacitors and resistors as necessary. I stuffed the original filter caps. The speaker was replaced by a previous servicer. It has a couple of small patches. The sound is outstanding! Requires an external antenna. It must be a good one. My Sweetheart tried to get me to let her keep it! 18"W x 11"H x 9"D. $499.00. (1680080)

 

Emerson BL210 (1939)

Emerson BL210 (1939)

Before I started the restoration on this very attractive Emerson BL 210 table radio, I thought of pinstripes as something that you found on cars. Apparently the folks at Ingraham decided to add a little touch of automotive class to the stylish cabinet they built for this little gem manufactured by Emerson in 1939. Saving the original pinstripes was a tricky business, but the cabinet came out very nice, with a gorgeous slick finish having only a few minor flaws. The back was badly stained so I gave it a coat of brown paint. A new dial glass, a full set of high testing tubes, all new capacitors and resistors as necessary. A full alignment produced a great playing little radio with surprisingly good sound from the perfect speaker. Broadcast and Police Band. Requires an external antenna. Only one of these has ever sold on radio attic, so it must be fairly uncommon. In any case, you will be hard-pressed to find a nicer one. 12"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. $459.00. (1680079)

 

Knockout Regenerative Receiver (circa 1928)

Knockout Regenerative Receiver (circa 1928)

From a little off the beaten antique radio path comes this unique and interesting little Knockout regenerative receiver. During my research of this set, a vigorous discussion ensued as to whether it was a factory made radio, a kit radio, or just homemade. In any case, it really is quite a "knockout." When I got it, the original bus style wiring had been removed and replaced with modern wire. I removed all of that and rewired it with period appropriate 12 gauge bus wire with a lot of help and parts from my new friend Chas. It is fitted with a high testing UX-201A tube, and works quite well. It works well with a 4.5V to 6V "A" cell and a 24V "B" cell. This can be four "D" cells and three 9V batteries. Requires high impedance headphones of roughly 2000 ohms. For an additional $35 I will include a period appropriate set of those. I know this radio isn't for everyone, but I hope someone will take a shine to it. If you are not familiar with regenerative receivers, you should do some research before buying this set. 12"W x 8"H x 8"D. $179.00. (1680035)

 

Philco 40-145 Code 121 (1940)

Philco 40-145 Code 121 (1940)

Possibly the most pristine radio ever to fall into my hands, this stylish Philco 40-145 retains its original finish, grille cloth, knobs, pushbuttons, and almost every screw, nut and lockwasher. The cabinet has a few dings and mars, but overall presents remarkably well for an 81 year old. Actual color a little more to the brown than the camera made it. The knob graphics are somewhat worn. My home made dial glass is a little blurry in places and the original grille cloth has a few flaws. A full set of high testing tubes, all new caps, resistors as necessary, and a lot of the rubber wiring replaced. Broadcast and two shortwave bands. Reception is surprisingly good on the internal antenna. There is an antenna screw for more distant stations. I have provided a cable for the included phonograph jack. Flip the switch to phono and hook up your mobile devices. If you like originality, this one is a good choice! 14"W x 10"H x 8"D. $350.00. (1680081)

 

Philco 48-206 (1948)

Philco 48-206 (1948)

Can you say Naugahyde? That's what they called the vinyl covering on this radio back when I was a kid. Whatever you call it, it is in very nice condition on this Philco table radio from 1948. A little bit of staining on the top, but all in all quite nice. Simple, attractive in a leather kind of way, and resistant to scuffs and scratches! I replaced all the capacitors, most of the resistors, and put a good set of tubes in it. Picks up local stations on its internal antenna, but has an external antenna wire which is grounded to the back of the set but can be used if you want to get more distance. I have added a cable for your mobile devices. Not a particularly old set but fairly uncommon. A good choice if you would like to add something unique to your collection without breaking the bank. 14"W x 8"H x 7"D. $209.00. (1680041)

 

Philco 50-520 (1949-1950)

Philco 50-520 (1949-1950)

Here's a nice looking little Philco table radio from the early 50s, perfect for someone who wants to get into antique radio on a budget. The styling is simple, yet attractive. The chassis is unique in my experience, employing three tube types: Octal, Loktal and seven-pin mini. I gave it a full set of high testing tubes, replaced caps and resistors as necessary. The cabinet has a few flaws, but is very nice. The camera made it a little whiter than it actually is. The color is the correct, original beige. Receives fairly well on the internal antenna. External antenna wire for distant stations. I had to make the back cover. All in all, an attractive little radio and a price to match! 10-1/2"W x 6"H x 5-1/2"D. $109.00. (1680070)

 

Philco 80 "JR" Mini Cathedral (1932-1933)

Philco 80 "JR" Mini Cathedral (1932-1933)

Money was tight in the early 30s, and a lot of poor performing four-tube radios were produced to address that issue. The "JR" was Philco's entry into this market, but they pulled a trick out of their hat by adding regeneration to the IF stage, giving it the gain of a five-tube receiver at a four-tube price. The cabinet is in very nice condition with only a few minor specs and dings. I gave it an extremely slick finish with 14 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. There was some staining in the front veneer, but I was afraid to keep sanding. Not quite as bad as the camera makes it seem. The Photo Booth made the sides a little lighter than they actually are, and are closer in tint to the top photo. I had to paint the chassis. A full set of good tubes. All of the Philco capacitors were stuffed with new ones to maintain originality. Resistors replaced as necessary and a full alignment. The speaker is perfect and the sound is decent. The receiver sensitivity is better than most four-tube radios. Taken all together it is a pretty darn nice little radio, and not one you see every day. 14"H x 12"W x 8-1/2"D. $375.00. (1680076)

 

RCA 24BT-2 Farm Radio (1940)

RCA 24BT-2 Farm Radio (1940)

Popular wisdom in antique radios is that it's no use listing battery radios. Nobody wants them because they don't want to fool with the batteries. I have solved that problem by building a regulated AC supply for this otherwise very nice RCA 24BT-2. The finish appears original and is fairly nice, with a few mars and dings from 81 years in the business. I finished the restoration started by a previous owner. I had to make up a power harness with an original plug. You can unplug it from the power supply and use a battery if you want. Capacitors replaced by previous owner. I gave it a full set of high testing tubes and a full alignment Receiver sensitivity is fairly good. Requires an external antenna. Cool shutter mechanism connected to the on-off switch to indicate power is on. Unlike regular AC radios, battery sets have almost instant warmup for you impatient types. All in all it's a fairly nice radio. 18"W x 11"H x 9-1/2"D. $149.00. (1680083)

 

RCA 55X (1941)

RCA 55X (1941)

I guess World War II was in our sights already, and maybe brass was already being rationed, but, come on RCA, no escutcheon? Beyond that, this 1941 RCA 55X was a top-of-the-line AM table radio. Popular with collectors, it is one of very few in its time that had two speakers! As a result the sound quality is quite good and projects very well. Solid wood cabinet with walnut veneer front. RCA had this tinted almost black to cover up a dark spot in the solid wood top. I don't like tinting them that dark, so the flaw in the wood shows up. It doesn't look as bad as the camera made it. I gave it a full set of good tubes, replaced all the caps and resistors as necessary. Full alignment. Receiver sensitivity is good on the internal antenna, but there is a wire provided for an external antenna. I have provided a switch and a cable for your mobile devices. I had to make one of the speaker grills, the back cover, and I had to replace the veneer on the front. A nice slick finish, with 14 coats of lacquer. All in all, a fairly unique, good looking, good performing, and I think, a very cool AM radio from one of the biggest radio companies in the world. 17"W x 7-1/2"H x 6-3/4"D. $350.00. (1680056)

 

RCA RGA12Y (1965?)

RCA RGA12Y (1965?)

This RCA RGA12Y is a pretty little thing that mom and dad probably got for their daughter for her college dorm room. There isn't much in the radio literature about it, but it had to be one of the last of the tube type AM only table radios. The cabinet is very nice, maybe not quite as white as my LED lighting and camera made it. The receiver sensitivity is fairly good on the internal antenna, and the sound is fairly decent from the 4-inch speaker. I replaced all the capacitors and gave it a good set of tubes. I have no idea what it is worth, but it was just too nice to throw away. I sure hope someone will take a shine to it and give it a good home. 10-1/2"W x 7"H x 4"D. $45.00. (1680072)

 

RCA X551 (1951)

RCA X551 (1951)

If you're looking to get into antique radio on the cheap, you just hit the jackpot. This plain Jane little RCA X551 is one of RCA's "Golden Throat" radios, so named as part of an ad campaign where they endeavored to maximize sound quality with superior electrical design and matching cabinets to speakers to get the best out of the radio. This one came to me in fairly sad shape. Someone had turned the knobs with paint on their fingers, and had paint all over the radio. It had a couple of cracks, which I repaired, but are not perfect. It is missing its front panel logo. I have included a cable for your mobile devices. Just remove the brown plug from the right side, plug in the cable and adjust the volume with your mobile device and volume control. I have seen these in the price guide as high as $250. This one has some shortcomings, and I am pricing it accordingly. 12"W x 9"H x 6"D. $109.00. (1680055)

 

Sentinel 5721S Tombstone (1934)

Sentinel 5721S Tombstone (1934)

Hot off the presses of radio obscurity comes this Sentinel 5721S "Minute Man." None has ever sold on the Attic. This is my first Sentinel, and it is a pretty nice radio. The cabinet was refinished and the chassis restoration started by a previous owner who quit when he discovered the bad power transformer. I replaced that, everything else that needed replacement and gave it a full alignment. A few dings and flaws in the finish, and not as slick as my work. The color coded dial and band switch are a nice touch. The dial is a little cloudy but readable. I couldn't find a replacement. Knobs are what was on it. No idea if they are original. Someone long ago put a remote speaker jack in the cabinet. Receiver sensitivity is good and the sound is great from the perfect speaker. Want something different? Here it is! 16"H x 14"W x 8"D. $295.00. (1680077)

 

Stewart-Warner 9003B (1947?)

NEW!

Stewart-Warner 9003B (1947?)

For knock down, drag out, eye popping curb appeal, it will be hard to beat this very rare Stewart Warner 9003B table radio. The large cabinet is extremely well made and complex in its design. The chassis is well designed and is a good performer on broadcast and both short wave bands. The internal antenna works quite well for local stations. The dial glass was an expensive reproduction. The original speaker was missing, and I had to replace it with a permanent magnet speaker, which has been reconed and is perfect. The sound is very good. New grille cloth pretty similar to the original. There are some tiny cracks in the left and right edges of the top, and a few other blemishes and veneer repairs in the otherwise very nice cabinet. Not piano finish by any means, but pretty well dressed with eight coats of lacquer. I have fabricated a mobile device cable to utilize the original Stewart Warner phonograph jack. None has ever sold on the Attic. I am very deep into this one expense wise, I hope someone will think the asking price is worth it. 20"W x 12-1/2"H x 10"D. $499.00. (1680084)

 

Stewart-Warner R104A Cathedral (1932)

Stewart-Warner R104A Cathedral (1932)

Have you ever heard of a Wunderlich tube? Neither had I until I undertook the restoration of this beautiful Stewart-Warner R104A cathedral. $75 later, I had a gleaming, NIB blue Wunderlich detector tube. These were expensive then as now, and were almost never used. This very rare R104A was one of the few AC sets to ever have one. They provide full-wave detection of the audio signal instead of the half wave detection used in most radios, providing higher output and better fidelity. The beautiful two-tone classic cathedral cabinet has a few minor flaws but is overall in gorgeous condition with twelve coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. The speaker was professionally re-coned and sounds great. I had to replace the power transformer, the grille cloth, the veneer on the sides, and I had to make the tuning knob. All new capacitors and resistors as necessary, and a full alignment. A full set of tubes that all test to new specs. Receiver sensitivity is very good. This is a very uncommon radio. Only one has ever sold on radio attic. I spent a ton of time and money restoring this set. I sure hope you, like me, will think it was worth it. 18-1/2"H x 15"W x 12"D. $825.00. (1680049)

 

Tuska 228 Regenerative Receiver (1924)

Tuska 228 Regenerative Receiver (1924)

By the mid-1920s most AM radios were of the TRF type. Tuska went with the Regenerative design and was fairly successful with it. The Tuska 228 is considered by many to be near the pinnacle of the regens. At 97 years old, this one is in pretty nice condition. The cabinet is as I found it. For $60 additional I will refinish it. I have equipped it with four 01A tubes, three NOS and the other 80%. Receiver sensitivity is quite good for its time, and the volume is surprising for a radio of this design. The included speaker has no markings on it but works well. The two large knobs are not original. Some of the wiring is not original. I corrected a major oversight of the design and provided an on-off switch. Operating one of these is a combination of art, science, and magic. If you are not familiar with regenerative receivers, do some homework before buying this. I ran it with one 6V and five 12V gel cells (total cost about 75 bucks) and it performed well. 24"W x 7-1/2"H x 8"D. Speaker is 24"H with a 10-1/2" diameter horn. $399.00. (1680063)

 

Zenith 5-R-216 Cube (1937)

Zenith 5-R-216 Cube (1937)

For an all around good looking, compact, black dial Zenith, it's hard to beat this 5R216 Cube from 1937. The five-tube chassis is well-designed and the sound from the 5-inch side mounted, perfect speaker is decent. Zenith had this tinted very dark due to some less than perfect wood on the sides. I refinished it with the same dark look. The tint of the sides and top is a little darker than the photos make it. The finish is very nice, with a few minor flaws. The chassis is fully restored with a full set of high testing tubes for long service life. New grille cloth. All in all, a very sharp little radio. 12"W x 10"H x 9-1/2"D. $399.00. (1680064)

 

Zenith 5-S-319 (1939)

Zenith 5-S-319 (1939)

Once in a great while I get my hands on one of these things, and the whole time I am restoring it, all I can think is "what a sweet little radio." This is one of those. Everything about this little 5S319 epitomizes Zenith's exceptional mastery of style, technical expertise, and quality that made them a leader in AM radio for over 50 years. One of the nicest looking and best-performing table radios I have ever restored. I see now why they are so highly prized by collectors. This one came to me in fairly sad condition. I had to do several veneer repairs, some better than others. I replaced all of the capacitors and resistors, gave it a full set of high testing tubes and a gorgeous, slick finish with 15 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. The knobs and pushbuttons are reproductions. The grille cloth is not original. I removed the dangerous 6X5 rectifier tube and replaced it with a solid-state rectifier. I will be glad to supply it with the tube type if you want, but if it shorts and burns up your transformer, I can't fix it for free. 13"W x 9"H x 7-1/2"D. $750.00. (1680051)

 

Zenith 6-D-629 "Boomerang" (1942)

Zenith 6-D-629 "Boomerang" (1942)

Collectors are starting to notice these early 40s table radios, and this Zenith 6D629 is one of the reasons. Called the "boomerang" due to the shape of the dial, it is stylish, attractive and very well made. The tuning mechanism is interesting in that they put the tuner drive in front of the speaker, allowing them to get a larger speaker in a smaller cabinet. The resulting sound is at the top of the class for a radio this size. The near perfect cabinet is slick and gorgeous. Receives well on the "wave magnet" antenna, with screws for external antenna. All high testing tubes, all new caps, resistors as necessary. New dial cover and new grille cloth. The back needed a lot of work from considerable road rash. The knobs are not available so I had to sub some similar ones. One heck of a nice radio taken all together. 14"W x 8-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. $429.00. (1680075)

 

Zenith 6-S-527 (1941)

Zenith 6-S-527 (1941)

Zenith made a very attractive and popular radio in the 6S527. The pinstriped bands of veneer, and the elaborate speaker grille are very eye-catching. The cabinet was quite nice as received. I touched up a few places and put four coats of nitrocellulose lacquer over it. It retains a few dings and witness marks from its 80 years of prior service, but overall presents very well. The sound is quite good from the 4-inch perfect speaker. A labor-intensive restoration as I had to replace a lot of the miserable rubber wiring. A full set of good tubes, all new capacitors, including stuffing the original Filter cap, resistors as necessary, and a full alignment. The original knobs and buttons are not the best but I thought did not warrant replacement. I replaced the dangerous 6X5 rectifier tube with a solid-state rectifier. Broadcast and short wave. Receives well on the internal wave magnet antenna, but has connections on back for more distant station. All in all a great looking and great performing radio, backed by the Zenith slogan, "The quality goes in before the name goes on." 16"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. $399.00. (1680082)
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