Mike Boessen's Radio Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2018"

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Atwater Kent 856 (1935)

Atwater Kent 856 (1935)

As beautiful as it is rare, this Atwater Kent 856 from 1935 is a real eye catcher. AK also gave it some cool features, like a dial that lights the selected band, and a two-speed tuner that you can switch from high to low without removing your hand from the knob. The front is ornate and fitted with gorgeous booked veneer. The chassis is a very good performer with amazing sound from the perfect 8-inch speaker. This came to me with two coats of lead based white paint on it. After 12 hours of scrubbing I got 99.9% of it off, but damaged the front veneer in one spot (see photos). It really isn't terrible, and you don't notice it if you are not looking for it. The gloss finish is the slickest I have ever done. 18 coats were needed to cover up the grain after cleaning the white paint. While it retains a few specks and dings, it is crazy nice. A lot of people would call it piano finish. I replaced all the caps, most of the resistors and most of the rubber wiring. A full set of tubes that all test new for long service life. This thing was ruined when I got it, but now it is pretty much a show stopper. $849.00. (1680104)

 

Crosley 124 "Playboy" (1932)

Crosley 124 "Playboy" (1932)

The 124 Playboy was a fairly good seller for Crosley in the early 30s. It has a large, substantial look to it. They used the space for a very good sounding 8-inch speaker and a well designed chassis. If I had known then what I know now I would have scrapped this one. I had to replace the veneer over the arch, make the tube cover and chassis metal pan. I had to paint the chassis. My genius nephew-in-law 3-D printed the escutcheon for me. The top had a tiny bit of ripple which I didn't notice, so when I wet sanded the ten base coats of semigloss, I wound up with that showing through the otherwise nice, slick finish. It isn't as bad as the photo booth lighting made it look in the top photo. It has the early 30s antenna type volume control, so you have to crank it up to get weak stations. Requires an external antenna. It has some shortcomings and I'm pricing it accordingly, but it is still a pretty darn cool radio. 17"W x 17"H x 11"D. $300.00. (1680127)

 

Crosley 154 (1933)

Crosley 154 (1933)

This adorable little Crosley 154 came to me in absolutely horrible condition, but it is the only example of this radio I am aware of, so I wanted to restore it. The front veneer was in very bad condition, but I spruced it up the best I could. A lot of flaws remain in the otherwise nice finish after 80 years of obviously hard living. The photo finish is gone from the lower left and right columns. The speaker is not original and has a couple of patches by a previous servicer. I had to paint the chassis. Crosley employed regeneration in the IF circuit to give it the gain of a five-tuber. It has the 1930s style antenna volume control, so you have to turn it up to pick up weak stations. The gold sparkle in the luxurious Brown Lurex grille cloth doesn't show up in the photos but is very elegant. While it has some shortcomings, this radio is extremely rare. None has ever sold on the attic, and the one on Radio Museum is this one. Despite its blemishes, this really is a little cutie, and if you're a Crosley guy, I'm betting you don't have one of these. Requires an external antenna. 12-1/2"H x 10"W x 8"D. $299.00. (1680106)

 

Detrola 146 (1937)

Detrola 146 (1937)

My latest offering from the Motor City is this attractive, fairly large Detrola 146 table radio. It came to me with a previous restoration over several deep "witness marks" on the top. I was afraid to sand through the veneer, so I cleaned it up and put 15 coats of lacquer over it. A poor attempt at veneer replacement on the lower trim forced me to replace that with American Walnut. The resulting finish is slick, shiny, and gorgeous. A full set of high testing tubes, all new capacitors and resistors as necessary. I stuffed the original filter caps. The speaker was replaced by a previous servicer. It has a couple of small patches. The sound is outstanding! Requires an external antenna. It must be a good one. My Sweetheart tried to get me to let her keep it! 18"W x 11"H x 9"D. $459.00. (1680080)

 

Emerson DS-436 (1940-1941)

Emerson DS-436 (1940-1941)

When I was a kid, Cadillac was the king of cars. If a radio was going to be a Cadillac, it would be this awesome Emerson DS346. This thing has features galore. Linear scale indicators for volume and tone. A bright new tuning eye. Huge, perfect, "shock mounted" 8-inch speaker that sounds just incredible, driven by the perfectly matched 6L6 push-pull outputs. A very well designed chassis that has a unique mounting, where it is suspended on rubber washers instead of sitting on the base like most are. The Ingraham cabinet is very stylish and ornate. A couple of "witness marks" too deep to sand, so I filled them before covering the cabinet with 18 coats of lacquer for a nice, slick finish. A not too bad stain on the top. The chassis was restored when I got it, and the workmanship looks good. Receives well on the internal antenna with a wire for external. These are rare. Only two have sold, both last year. If you missed out on those, here's your chance to own one very impressive radio. 18"W x 12-1/2"H x 12"D. $699.00. (1680122)

 

General Electric 7-2927A

General Electric 7-2927A

A quick look around my site will tell you this isn't my usual thing. A good friend gave me this GE transistor set with the dial stuck. I got that fixed, so here it is. This is not terribly old. I would guess late 80s? There is a date code: 3733 in the battery box if that helps. It is a very nice and very well made little radio. AM/FM/TVHI/TVLO. Reception is very good on FM, and not bad on AM. Large, easy to read dial, and pretty good sound for a "pocket" transistor. Fairly heavy. Battery included! 6"H x 3-1/2"W x 1-3/4"D. $49.00. (1680139)

 

General Electric J62 (1940/1941)

General Electric J62 (1940/1941)

The unique and attractive J62 "jewel box" was a very good seller for GE and quite a few have survived. This one had been stripped, stained and varnished when I got it. You can't strip wiped on stain, so I touched it up the best I could and put ten coats of lacquer and two sanding operations on it. Still some grain and joints showing. I was able to remove most of the stain from the latticework and grille to give it back some contrast. The last guy left the GE logo, so there was nothing I could do about that. The back cover has a small piece broken off near the bottom. All that said, the chassis is well made and a fairly good performer. The sound is surprisingly good from the perfect 5-inch speaker. Receives well on the internal antennas, with a terminal for external. I made a cable for the phono jack. As with the original, you tune off-station and connect your mobile device. My usual thorough restoration, with all high testing tubes for long service life. Despite its minor shortcomings, this is still a very nice little radio. Broadcast and short wave. 15"W x 10-1/2"H x 8-1/2"D. $299.00. (1680116)

 

Grunow 470 (1935)

Grunow 470 (1935)

After Grunow merged with US Radio and Television to form General Household Utilities Corporation in 1933, they still sold radios under the Grunow name. This smallish Grunow 470 tombstone, while only a four-tuber, surprised me by having a massive 8-inch speaker crammed into it. Consequently, the sound is the best of any four-tube radio I have ever restored. The cabinet has a bit of grain still showing on the sides, but otherwise a very nice finish. A previous servicer replaced the On/Off switch with an On/Off/Tone control, which works well, so I left it. It has the early 30s antenna volume control so you have to crank the volume for weak stations. Reception from the meticulously restored chassis is good for a four-tuber. Noteworthy is the interesting practice of mounting the rectifier on top of the power transformer, the logic of which is lost on me. I had to make a replacement for the missing tuning knob. All in all, if you want great sound at a great price, this should be what you are looking for. Requires an external antenna. 14"H x 12"W x 7"D. $250.00. (1680126)

 

Majestic 5A410 (1946)

Majestic 5A410 (1946)

Once in a while a friend or relative will show up at my shop with a family radio that was left after the passing of a relative. They never want to spend any money on them but just can't get themselves to throw them away. This little Majestic 5A410 is one of those. I, too have a hard time throwing them away. I took a quick look at it, pulled the chassis and restored it before noticing a small crack in the case. Too late now. I repaired the crack as best I could. It doesn't look as bad as it does in the picture. The radio is a very good performer on the internal antenna, with a clip for an external if you want more distance. The sound is pretty good from the perfect 4-inch speaker. Fully restored and aligned, with a full set of high testing tubes. I've seen these sell for as much as $250. That little crack will save you a bunch of money! The Majestic logo on the back says "Mighty Monarch Of The Air." How can you resist that? Broadcast only. 12"W x 8"H x 7"D. $159.00. (1680111)

 

Philco 50-520 (1949-1950)

Philco 50-520 (1949-1950)

Here's a nice looking little Philco table radio from the early 50s, perfect for someone who wants to get into antique radio on a budget. The styling is simple, yet attractive. The chassis is unique in my experience, employing three tube types: Octal, Loktal and seven-pin mini. I gave it a full set of high testing tubes, replaced caps and resistors as necessary. The cabinet has a few flaws, but is very nice. The camera made it a little whiter than it actually is. The color is the correct, original beige. Receives fairly well on the internal antenna. External antenna wire for distant stations. I had to make the back cover. The cabinet has been refinished. All in all, an attractive little radio and a price to match! 10-1/2"W x 6"H x 5-1/2"D. $99.00. (1680070)

 

Philco 80 "JR" Mini Cathedral (1932-1933)

Philco 80 "JR" Mini Cathedral (1932-1933)

Money was tight in the early 30s, and a lot of poor performing four-tube radios were produced to address that issue. The "JR" was Philco's entry into this market, but they pulled a trick out of their hat by adding regeneration to the IF stage, giving it the gain of a five-tube receiver at a four-tube price. The cabinet is in very nice condition with only a few minor specs and dings. I gave it an extremely slick finish with 14 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer. There was some staining in the front veneer, but I was afraid to keep sanding. Not quite as bad as the camera makes it seem. The Photo Booth made the sides a little lighter than they actually are, and are closer in tint to the top photo. I had to paint the chassis. A full set of good tubes. All of the Philco capacitors were stuffed with new ones to maintain originality. Resistors replaced as necessary and a full alignment. The speaker is perfect and the sound is decent. The receiver sensitivity is better than most four-tube radios. Taken all together it is a pretty darn nice little radio, and not one you see every day. 14"H x 12"W x 8-1/2"D. $349.00. (1680076)

 

Philco Transistor Bookshelf Radio

Philco Transistor Bookshelf Radio

Among many things I have "fallen heir" to is this cute little Philco branded transistor bookshelf radio. AM/FM with built in antennas. Sound is pretty good, and receiver sensitivity isn't bad. Runs on four "D" cells, included. Not sure who is the target audience for this, and no idea its value, but I guess I'll list it here and see what happens. $49.00. (1680142)

 

Radiola 18 (1928)

Radiola 18 (1928)

Time for some shelf clearing. This radio is unrestored and is being sold "as is." The original finish is fairly nice and would probably present well with a little touch-up. Missing the volume bezel. Some tubes in it, no idea if they are good. Has a ziplock with parts labeled "Radiola 17 parts" inside (see photo). Very heavy (approximately 40 pounds. 27-1/2"W x 8"H x 9"D. $50.00. (1680117)

 

RCA 86T-2 (1937)

RCA 86T-2 (1937)

At first glance, one might tend to write off this very nice RCA 86T-2 as "plain Jane" or "ordinary" but it is nothing of the sort. It is a fairly large table radio, and RCA didn't waste the space, fitting it with a very well designed six-tube chassis, installed in an attractive waterfall cabinet with contrasting veneers and the signature silver pin stripes. The huge, quite accurate sunburst dial is very brightly and evenly illuminated. It includes a nice band select dial window and a vernier dial for more accurate station location. The larger than average 6-1/2" perfect speaker produces nothing short of outstanding sound, on par with some consoles I have worked on. My usual thorough restoration, including replacing the rubber wiring, produced a very good performing chassis on broadcast and short wave. A full set of high testing tubes top off the restoration for long service life. The finish is slick and gorgeous, with a few minor chips and dings, and a veneer repair on the lower right side where I did not succeed in matching the grain. There is a small, barely noticeable crack in the escutcheon above the tuning knob. Taken all together, this is a very nice radio from one of the best and largest radio companies. If good sound is important to you, you will find it here. Requires an external antenna. 17"W x 11-1/2"H x 9-1/2"D. $379.00. (1680140)

 

Stewart-Warner 9003B (1947?)

Stewart-Warner 9003B (1947?)

For knock down, drag out, eye popping curb appeal, it will be hard to beat this very rare Stewart Warner 9003B table radio. The large cabinet is extremely well made and complex in its design. The chassis is well designed and is a good performer on broadcast and both short wave bands. The internal antenna works quite well for local stations. The dial glass was an expensive reproduction. The original speaker was missing, and I had to replace it with a permanent magnet speaker, which has been reconed and is perfect. The sound is very good. New grille cloth pretty similar to the original. There are some tiny cracks in the left and right edges of the top, and a few other blemishes and veneer repairs in the otherwise very nice cabinet. Not piano finish by any means, but pretty well dressed with eight coats of lacquer. I have fabricated a mobile device cable to utilize the original Stewart Warner phonograph jack. None has ever sold on the Attic. I am very deep into this one expense wise, I hope someone will think the asking price is worth it. 20"W x 12-1/2"H x 10"D. $499.00. (1680084)

 

Stromberg-Carlson 1110 (1946)

Stromberg-Carlson 1110 (1946)

Stromberg-Carlson got their start making some of the earlier telephone switching equipment. Their equipment was famous for reliability, and when they moved to New York and branched out into radio, they carried that commitment into the new business. This 1110 is a nice example of that commitment to quality. The very well designed chassis is a good performer on the internal antenna, with screws for external. Six preset buttons can be used on either BC or SW, not a common feature. The cabinet is covered with attractive veneers and 15 coats of lacquer for a nice slick finish. I fine tuned a previous restoration, installed all high testing tubes and gave it a full alignment. The sound is the most amazing I have ever heard from a 5-inch speaker. I have provided a mobile device cable for the phono input. The finish on the dial bezel it a bit deteriorated, but not bad enough to risk fooling with it. A few dings and specks, but overall a very nice cabinet. Definitely an upper crust table radio. 16"W x 9-1/2"H x 9"D. $649.00. (1680125)

 

Truetone D-727 (1937)

Truetone D-727 (1937)

The guys at Detrola conjured up a very nice radio for Western Auto to add to their Truetone lineup in 1937. One of the most feature packed table radios I've ever restored. The ornate, attractive cabinet is stuffed with a very good performing Detrola 175 chassis. I gave it a gorgeous, slick, nearly perfect finish with 15 coats of lacquer and two sanding operations. Eight channels of motorized automatic tuning, and a bright new tuning eye. New dial and dial glass. It has a nice, big, professionally reconed speaker driven by push-pull outputs. Meticulously restored chassis with all high testing tubes and a full alignment. Broadcast and two short wave bands. Requires an external antenna. This is a very nice example of this popular model. People are going to notice it! 21"W x 12"H x 9"D. $995.00. (1680108)

 

Weltron 2001 Space Helmet (1971)

Weltron 2001 Space Helmet (1971)

Weltron cashed in on the Apollo craze with this unique and very well made model 2001 space helmet radio. AM/FM/8-track. AC, 12V lighter plug or eight "C" cells. Everything works except the external speaker jacks (Exact same plug as the 12v cable. You do the math). AM/FM reception is quite good and the sound isn't bad from the perfect 4-inch speakers. End segment missing from the antenna, but it is still too long. I threaded a screw into it so you can extend it normally. Balance slider a bit sticky in spite of my best efforts. A lot of tiny scratches in the front I couldn't polish out, but not too noticeable when viewed straight on. A repaired crack in the top (see photo). This came from a very dear friend 40 years ago, so hurts to sell. I hope someone will give it a good home. Reflection from my shirt in the front photo. After four tries, I gave up. Tapes available for a small fee, not guaranteed. Ask if interested. About 12-1/2"W x 12-1/2"H x 10-1/2"D. $299.00. (1680130)

 

Wild Planet DJ AM Transmitter

Wild Planet DJ AM Transmitter

This one is a bit of a departure for me, but I saw it on eBay and couldn't resist. The little guy is actually a pretty good AM transmitter! Built in DJ microphone, built in cassette player, and a 1/8" jack to plug in a CD player or mobile device. Everything works on it and the sound was quite good on my Crosley Super 11. Turn your kids or grandkids loose with it to practice their DJ skills or just use it to broadcast to any of your AM radios from the music source of your choice. It comes from the factory set to 1610 kHz. For a $25 fee I can convert it to 1250 kHz. The bottom was missing the rubber feet, so is pretty scratched up. I put rubber feet on it. The battery door was missing. I made a clear plastic one for it. Range is about 30-50 feet depending what antenna you have on your radio. It's really a pretty cool little device, and I'd bet your kids or grandkids would have some fun with it. Or use it to broadcast to your radios from your mobile device or CD player. 9-1/2"W x 7"D x 3"H. Batteries included! $75.00. (1680133)

 

Zenith 5-S-218 (1937/1938)

Zenith 5-S-218 (1937/1938)

Remember those little plastic hologram toys from Crackerjack boxes, where you would tilt them and get two different pictures? That is what the amazing highlights in the front and top grain on this gorgeous Zenith 5S218 look like. I removed the dark stains that masked this beautiful effect and gave it a very nice, slick finish. Original knobs and speaker cloth. My usual professional restoration on the well made and very good performing chassis. I installed a full set of high testing tubes for long service life. The original speaker was missing, so I had to replace it with a different brand. The sound is very good. A little barely noticeable water damage along the back edge of the right side. That said, the overall look and finish are fantastic, and will stand out in any collection. The 5S218 was a very popular model for Zenith, and is very popular with collectors today. If you don't have one, here is your chance to pick up one of the nicest examples of this radio you are likely to see. Requires an external antenna. 12"W x 10-1/2"H x 10"D. $599.00. (1680136)

 

Zenith 5-S-319 (1939)

Zenith 5-S-319 (1939)

Certain radios really caught the eye of buyers then, and now. This very nice Zenith 5S319 is one of those radios. This was a very good seller for Zenith, and a lot of them have survived. The cabinet is ornate and attractive, fronted with the classic, racetrack shaped dial that gives the set its nickname. The chassis is very well designed and a very good performer on shortwave and Broadcast. The reception is almost exactly as good on "automatic" as on dial tuning, which is rare. I gave it a very nice, slick finish, and my usual meticulous chassis rebuild, replacing all the caps and resistors. Full alignment, and a set of high testing tubes for long service life. Unfortunately, I couldn't save the fake zebra wood strip. To be honest, I have always felt that it looked out of place on the cabinet anyhow. One small veneer repair on the top rear. Knobs and pushbuttons are reproductions. I replaced the dangerous 6X5 rectifier with a solid state one. I can put a real one in there, but if it shorts and blows your power transformer, I won't cover that under warranty. This radio is top shelf in every regard except for the missing photo finish strip, and will be a standout in any collection. Many of these have sold in the 750 to 800 dollar range on Radio attic. I'm pricing this one a little lower because of the missing photo finish. Barring that, if you buy this radio, you will be getting one of the nicest examples of this model you are likely to find. $699.00. (1680137)

 

Zenith 6-D-317 (1938/1939)

Zenith 6-D-317 (1938/1939)

Among the most unique and attractive table radios ever made you would have to count this Zenith 6D317 World's Fair Glass Rod table radio. Zenith made this for the 1938 San Francisco World's fair, and I don't think a great many of them have survived. My buddy John suggested I illuminate the glass rods in a red, white, and blue theme, so I did. I think it's really cool, but if you don't like it there is a switch on the back to turn them off. A very nice finish with 20 coats of lacquer and three sanding operations. A few minor shortcomings from 90 years of service. My usual professional chassis restoration. Original knobs and buttons are a bit less than perfect, but very presentable. I had to make the back cover. This is a very unique and highly sought after radio, and not one you see every day. The lighted rods are amazing, and the performance is very good. I have a ton of work in it and I hope you will think it is worth the price. Requires an external antenna. 14"W x 8"H x 8"D. $1,099.00. (1680135)

 

Zenith 6-S-528 (1941)

Zenith 6-S-528 (1941)

Zenith cranked out a lot of radios with this basic chassis in them. For some reason, the smaller 6S527 is much more common. This one had a previous refinish job that was a little less than perfect, but I didn't want to strip it and lose the woodgrain pinstripes, so I doctored it up the best I could and put eight coats of lacquer over it. The result is a nice slick finish and a fairly good looking and good performing radio. The tint is a little darker at the bottom front, but not as bad as the camera made it look. The speaker has one patch by a previous servicer, but sounds very good. A full set of high testing tubes, all new caps, including stuffing the electrolytic, resistors as necessary and replaced most of the rubber wiring. After alignment, it receives Broadcast fairly well on the internal "wave magnet" antenna. There are screw terminals for shortwave and more distant stations. Remember the old Zenith slogan? "The quality goes in before the name goes on." 16"W x 8-3/4"H x 7-1/2"D. $349.00. (1680099)
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