Joe Millward's Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2017"

the Radio Attic


 

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DeWald 537 (1939)

DeWald 537 (1939)

David Wald started the Pierce Airo Radio Manufacturing Corporation in New York City around 1921. The name changed to DeWald around 1930. DeWald is recognized for having several collectable Catalin radio models. The 537 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) AC/DC radio. The radio chassis was restored by the previous owner, and meets the requirements for our guarantee. The capacitors were all replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and antenna lead. The cabinet is solid walnut with no veneers and was refinished by Gary Marvin to a nice semi-gloss finish. The knobs, chassis, speaker and dial scale are original. Gary added a new, crystal clear dial cover. The radio is pretty rare and is making a first appearance on the Radio Attic. A nice radio with a great price for your collection. 10"W x 6"H x 5"D. $299.00. (1600299)

 

Emerson AR-176 (1938)

NEW!

Emerson AR-176 (1938)

Emerson started radio production in New York in 1924. Operating in relative obscurity until 1932, they produced the "Pee-Wee" radio. By 1938 they had sold over a million "Pee-Wee" radios. They were the biggest user of Ingraham cabinets, which have great designs using curves and angles with beautiful veneer. The AR-176 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set. They came in many varieties: push-pull audio, single output audio, teledial chassis, and farm set. This version offers push-pull audio utilizing two 41 output tubes. It's an excellent performer with tons of audio, nice tone and great sensitivity across the dial. We replaced all of the capacitors, resistors and tubes checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, audio input, antenna lead and a new power cable have been added. Gary Marvin refinished the unique "slant-faced" cabinet with the finest grain fillers, paint and lacquer. It has its original Ingraham cabinet badge, and retains the original knobs, grille cloth and decals. A crystal-clear dial cover from Mark Palmquist was installed. This radio is one gorgeous, a perfect example of an AR-176. 17"H x 12-1/2"W x 10-1/2"D. $849.00. (1600346)

 

Emerson R-156 Tombstone (1938)

NEW!

Emerson R-156 Tombstone (1938)

Emerson used the R-156 model designation for several radios, each one with different cabinets, but utilizing the same chassis. Emerson used more Ingraham cabinets than any other manufacturer, and this model sports a simple, but beautiful Ingraham design. This version of the R-156 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,Police) radio. These sets perform well and have great sensitivity and volume across the dial. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. He added a new power cord and auxiliary cable for Bluetooth, iPod, iPad etc. Gary did a masterful job refinishing the cabinet. The American Walnut and Maple with Australian Laurel trim is stunning! He added a crystal-clear dial cover from Mark Palmquist. The chassis, speaker and knobs are original, and a reproduction grille cloth was installed. This is as fine of a restored R-156 you're going to find, and it's ready to grace someone's collection! 12-1/2"H x 9-1/2"W x 5"D. $499.00. (1600345)

 

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson started producing phonographs in 1915 in New York City, and is still producing products today. Emerson has made phonographs, radios, televisions, air conditioners, and later on it made refrigerators, computers, defibrillators, CD players and VCRs. The R-158 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,police) set. It was offered with a TV band at one time as well. Blake started the chassis restore by replacing all of the capacitors. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio cable were installed. The radio has very good sensitivity across the dial, and performs with nice tone and plenty of volume. Gary refinished the rosewood and walnut cabinet with the best products. This is an Ingraham cabinet and the Ingraham badge is present. The unique cabinet is accented with two brass strips that cross over the top and down the front of the set. The radio has the original dial with a new clear dial cover, knobs, grille cloth and speaker. Gary finished with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. A really nice looking and performing set for your collection. 15"W x 9-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. $499.00. (1600272)

 

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson Bell started radio production in Los Angeles, CA in 1926. Herb Bell began the business with his brother Elmer. Gilfillan made the chassis and Elmer made the cabinets. At one time or another, the whole family was involved in the business, including their father Anton. In 1929, Herb became partners with Mr. Jackson, and the company ceased operations in 1933. The model 62 is a six-tube, AM only radio. The radio had been restored by the previous owner, and Blake checked it out making sure it met our standards. A period-correct cloth power cord was installed. An audio cable is not available for this radio. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet. He finished the radio with a satin finish. The radio is gorgeous and has the original knobs and grille cloth. Also present is the often-missing "velvet tone" label located on the lower front of the radio. I think this tag is found only on the Fleur-de-Lis model. Other designs are the Swan, Tulip, Sunburst, Peacock, and the iconic Peter pan. If you are looking for a Fleur-de-Lis for your collection, it would be difficult to find one better than this one. 15"H x 13"W x 8-1/2"D. $699.00. (1600303)

 

RCA 6-T (1936)

RCA 6-T (1936)

In 1921, David Sarnoff started RCA as General Manager, and remained until 1970. By 1926, they already controlled the commercial radio industry, buying radio stations, and then formed NBC. Eventually, NBC was broken up into the other networks ABC and CBS. More on RCA in upcoming ads. The 6-T is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. He added a new power cord, external audio cable (Bluetooth, iPhone, iPad) and a safety fuse. RCA made great sets, and this radio plays strong and picks up plenty of stations across the dial. Gary stripped the cabinet. The burl walnut on the front is a nice contrast to the American Walnut found on the sides. Gary did beautiful work, and ended up with a "piano" lacquer finish. This radio has the original knobs, grille cloth, chassis, copper bezel, dial scale and 8-inch speaker. This fine example of an RCA 6-T would look perfect in your collection! 18-1/2"H x 13-1/2"W x 8-1/2"D. $599.00. (1600312)

 

RCA 103 (1935)

RCA 103 (1935)

The RCA 103 is a regenerative super-het. It contains a very unique circuit that was used a lot in radios from the mid 1920's, and could also be found in the popular Philco 84. This four-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio has really good sensitivity across the dial and good fidelity. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked all of the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. He installed a new power cord, so this radio is ready to go! Gary stripped and refinished the radio. He finished with a gorgeous lacquer "piano" finish, making this 103 one of the nicer ones you'll find. A unique and hard-to-find radio, perfect for any serious collector. 14"H x 11-1/2"W x 7"D. $399.00. (1600244)

 

RCA BX-57 (1951)

RCA BX-57 (1951)

Where do you start writing about RCA? This company dominated the electronics industry from 1919 to 1970, the entire time under the direction of David Sarnoff. He acquired Marconi, Westinghouse, NBC, and many other major companies. He owned the patents on the Superheterodyne radios that most companies couldn't afford to acquire, and his tyrannical business practices were legendary. The BX-57 is a four-tube, AM only AC/DC "portable" radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. The radio plays well across the dial utilizing an internal "loop" antenna. The radio appears to never have been used, and it still has the original RCA price tag on it! The cabinet shows minimal wear, and there are no chips or cracks. Gary hand-polished the radio, and it looks like he just pulled it off a shelf in a store! A wonderful, like new original RCA radio! 11"W x 8"H x 5"D. $269.00. (1600305)

 

Sentinel 293W (1946)

Sentinel 293W (1946)

The Sentinel Radio Corp. was located in Evanston, Illinois, and manufactured radios, televisions and phonographs from 1930 to 1957. Some brands were Erla, Wings and Musicaire which were sold in Coast to Coast stores. This six-tube, AM only Bakelite radio has had all of the capacitors replaced, along with resistors and tubes checked and replaced as needed. The radio utilizes an internal loop antenna and receives the AM band with sensitivity and volume. The case has no cracks and has been polished. A really nice radio at a great price! 11-1/2"W x 7-1/2"H x 6"D. $139.00. (1600140)

 

Silvertone 3869 (1938)

Silvertone 3869 (1938)

They are some models of radios where one can't find much information, and this Silvertone is one of them. What I do know is that it was made by Mission Bell, who was a Los Angeles company. I am also going to guess that it was made in the Gilfillan factory. One thing I have noticed is that a lot of Gilfillan chassis bolts come up from the bottom of the cabinet through the chassis and are fastened by a nut on TOP of the chassis. This is the case with this radio. The 3869 is a six-tube, AM only, AC radio. It has plenty of volume and good selectivity across the dial. The chassis restoration was done by a known radio guy in Oregon. The capacitors were all replaced, the resistors and tubes checked and replaced where needed. A new antenna lead was installed and I put an audio cable in for your external devise. The cabinet is original (restored). The knobs, grille cloth and speaker are all original to the radio. The Art Deco dial is in perfect condition and lights up nicely. This is a good-looking walnut cabinet and a very good performer. This radio will give you many years of listening pleasure and is priced to sell! 14"W x 8"H x 7"D. $399.00. (1600300)

 

Truetone D-2615 "Stratoscope" (1946)

Truetone D-2615 "Stratoscope" (1946)

I've written in previous ads about George Pepperdine (who later started Pepperdine University) starting Western Auto Supply in Kansas City in 1909. He expanded the company to Los Angeles, and in 1939, sold it to Gamble-Skogmo of Chicago and retired. The company continued to grow with 1200 stores and 600 franchise stores. The D2516 is a six-tube, AM only AC/DC set. The chassis was made by Belmont, and the radio has great sensitivity with an internal "loop" antenna. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. A new polarized power cord and audio cable were added. The radio was aligned and is a strong performer across the dial. The black Bakelite cabinet is in very good condition with no cracks or crazing and was hand-polished to a gorgeous luster. The original knobs and back are with the radio. This radio will offer many years of listening pleasure, and we stand behind our workmanship. 11"W x 8"H x 6"D. $299.00. (1600304)

 

Zenith 6-D-628 (1942)

Zenith 6-D-628 (1942)

The 6-D-628 was manufactured in 1942 and was one of the last radios Zenith produced before the war. The "D" designation identified the set as AC/DC set operating at 110 volts. The AC/DC sets had no transformer, but the rectifier tube acted as a transformer with DC output and tapped for the dial lamps. This radio was the big brother of the 6-D-525, known in 1941 as the very popular "Toaster" model. The 6-D-628 is a six-tube, AM only set. It produces a lot of volume and picks up stations all across the dial utilizing the "wave magnet" internal loop antenna, which works quite well. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, he checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. A new power cord and audio cable were added. Gary refinished the walnut Art Deco cabinet with his usual mastery, ending up with "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original brown knobs and speaker. We added a new period correct grille cloth, a new dial cover and a new reproduction back. This radio is seldom seen, possibly due to lower production numbers right before the war. Nice piece for the Zenith collector, and just a real beauty for any collection! 13"W x 7-1/2"H x 7"D. $499.00. (1600343)

 

Zenith 7-S-634 (1942)

Zenith 7-S-634 (1942)

The 1940-1942 Zenith table radios were a departure in design from previous years. They are all very collectable now, and most of them sound pretty darned good! The new "tone organ" tone selector with five choices that you can set in any configuration really helps the fidelity. They have surprisingly good bass response, due in part to the "boxy" cabinets. I have posted a 7-S-633, which uses the same chassis but different cabinet with a wrap-around grille. The 7-S-634 isn't as common. This is a seven-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) set. The newly designed "wave magnet" internal antenna loop works quite well. The radio has great sensitivity and volume across the dial. We went in and replaced all of the capacitors, checked all of the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. We did a bit of rewiring plus installation of an audio cable, safety fuse and new power chord. Gary did a fantastic job stripping and refinishing the mahogany cabinet to a "factory fresh" look. He skillfully applied lacquer for a "piano" luster. The radio look and plays great! Price includes shipping. 22"W x 11"H x 10"D. $749.00. (1600230)
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About Joe's Radio Shop

Shipping

At Joe's Radio Shop we do everything in our power to make sure our radios are packed with the utmost of care and protection.  We use double-sided boxes lined with Styrofoam creating a box within a box.  The radio has bubble wrap placed inside to protect the tubes, then double wrapped in bubble wrap and placed on packing peanuts on the bottom of the box.  The sides around the bubble wrapped radio are filled with packing peanuts and a piece of Styrofoam is placed on top of the radio and the box is then sealed.  Our larger radios and consoles have the speakers removed and are professionally packed by Diversified Packing and shipped via Greyhound.  We have never had any damage to any of our shipped radios.  We will ship radios with the company that offers the best rate; Fed-Ex, UPS, USPS and DHL are the preferred carriers.  Let us know if you have a preference for shipping.  Packages are shipped within three business days of payment.  Consoles and large radios may take a little longer due to a more involved packing process.  Tracking numbers will be provided to you, and we track the packages as well.

Payment

Joe's Radio Shop accepts payment through PayPal, credit cards (we use the Square, which requires a 3.75% fee) and checks.  Payment plus shipping must be deposited before we ship your radio to you.  Checks must clear our bank before shipping.  Joe's Radio Shop will not provide or sell your personal information to anyone.  Credit card information is shredded and discarded after the charge is made and deposited.  Upon ordering, you will receive an invoice via email with cost plus shipping charges.  A receipt will arrive with the radio.

Don't like the price? Give us an offer!

Joe's Radio Shop return policy:

We accept returns, but we would first try to resolve any issues and make sure your radio is functioning as it should.  A few guidelines for vintage tube radios to function properly:
1. Most radios need an antenna to function properly.  10-20 feet of wire connected to the "A" lug in the back of the chassis, which we will provide to you.  Some radios have internal antennas, or "loops."  For the most part, these radios should receive broadcast or "AM" stations in your area.
2. Multiple band radios that have 1-3 short wave bands will also need plenty of antenna.  There isn't much going on these day with short wave.  Many short wave stations have moved to satellite or the internet.  There are a few out there, and a good antenna is needed.  Ask us about antennas; we can describe how to make them to use at your home.  Try to place your radio on an outside wall, the reception will be better, especially with console radios.  Police and aviation (now UHF) bands no longer function in today's world.
3. There are things in a household that can cause static and interference.  Computers, fluorescent lighting, lighting potentiometers (dimmer switch), microwave ovens, digital TV and possibly your wi-fi system.  Try to keep the radio out of proximity to these devices.
4. Running the radio for long periods of time can can them to overheat causing damage.

Please contact us within seven days for a possible return.  E-mail us at joesradioshop1@gmail.com or phone us at 503-209-8414.  Our radios come with a six  month guarantee from the purchase date.  Any electrical damage or failure will be repaired free of cost minus materials and shipping.  If there is damage from shipping, the claim has to go through the shipper.  If we determine the damage is the shipper or buyers fault, we can negotiate a repair price.  If an issue can't be resolved to the buyer's liking, we will offer a full refund minus shipping and insurance.  If the buyer pays the shipper directly, the buyer assumes all responsibility for insurance settlements due to damage while in transit.  When shipping a radio back to us, please follow our packing guidelines listed under Shipping.  If the radio is improperly packed, the refund will be denied.



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