Joe Millward's Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2017"

the Radio Attic


 

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Airline 62-306 "Teledial" (1938)

Airline 62-306 "Teledial" (1938)

In the 1930's, radios were the cutting edge of new electronic innovation for consumers of that generation. Competition was fierce, so manufacturers were constantly improving the radios and adding features. The Teledial was a quick way to dial in your favorite stations without having to manually turn a dial and search. Most of them were set up much like a rotary dial on telephones, and made the tuning process much easier and faster. All the radio manufacturers at one time or another featured Teledials, soon replaced by electric selection and motorized dials. The 62-306 is a six-tube, two-band (SB+SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and external audio cable were installed. The Teledial is backlit and the eye tube is bright and active. The chassis is super clean and looks like new. Gary stripped the Walnut and Australian laurel, and skillfully applied lacquer for a gorgeous "piano" finish. The set has original knobs, chassis and speaker. A unique and beautiful radio which will grace anyone's collection! 19"W x 10"H x 9"D. $795.00. (1600392)

 

Atwater Kent 725 (1936)

Atwater Kent 725 (1936)

Atwater Kent started producing high-quality radios in Philadelphia in 1922. Between 1923 and 1927, they produced 1.3 million radios, making them the leading radio manufacturer in America. Due to problems with the unions and the depression, he closed the factory in 1936. Model 725 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set. The 725 has separate lights for each band, and the dial pointer is illuminated when the radio is turned on. All of the capacitors were replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse and external audio cable were installed. The cabinet was stripped and refinished with a nice satin finish. The original knobs and grille cloth are with the set. The speaker was re-coned and a new dial cover from Mark Palmquist was installed. This is a really nice sounding Atwater Kent, and will definitely grace anyone's collection! 17"H x 13"W x 8"D. $599.00. (1600371)

 

DeWald 537 (1939)

DeWald 537 (1939)

David Wald started the Pierce Airo Radio Manufacturing Corporation in New York City around 1921. The name changed to DeWald around 1930. DeWald is recognized for having several collectable Catalin radio models. The 537 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) AC/DC radio. The radio chassis was restored by the previous owner, and meets the requirements for our guarantee. The capacitors were all replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and antenna lead. The cabinet is solid walnut with no veneers and was refinished by Gary Marvin to a nice semi-gloss finish. The knobs, chassis, speaker and dial scale are original. Gary added a new, crystal clear dial cover. The radio is pretty rare and is making a first appearance on the Radio Attic. A nice radio with a great price for your collection. 10"W x 6"H x 5"D. $299.00. (1600299)

 

Emerson 45 (1935)

Emerson 45 (1935)

Emerson started up in 1915 manufacturing phonographs and producing records in New York City. They started selling radios in 1924, with their first big seller being the "Peewee" in 1932. After the war, they branched out, selling home appliances and later, televisions. The Emerson Corporation is still in business today. The model 45 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. The original phono input can be adapted for an external device upon request. The Ingraham cabinet is in great condition and was refinished to a semi-gloss finish. The knobs, chassis and speaker are original to the set. A period-correct reproduction grille cloth was added as well as a new cloth power cord and safety fuse. These early Emerson tombstones are seldom seen, especially in this condition. This one is ready for that special Emerson collector, or for your collection at home. 16"H x 12"W x 9"D. $629.00. (1600375)

 

Emerson AR-176 (1938)

Emerson AR-176 (1938)

Emerson started radio production in New York in 1924. Operating in relative obscurity until 1932, they produced the "Pee-Wee" radio. By 1938 they had sold over a million "Pee-Wee" radios. They were the biggest user of Ingraham cabinets, which have great designs using curves and angles with beautiful veneer. The AR-176 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set. They came in many varieties: push-pull audio, single output audio, teledial chassis, and farm set. This version offers push-pull audio utilizing two 41 output tubes. It's an excellent performer with tons of audio, nice tone and great sensitivity across the dial. We replaced all of the capacitors, resistors and tubes checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, audio input, antenna lead and a new power cable have been added. Gary Marvin refinished the unique "slant-faced" cabinet with the finest grain fillers, paint and lacquer. It has its original Ingraham cabinet badge, and retains the original knobs, grille cloth and decals. A crystal-clear dial cover from Mark Palmquist was installed. This radio is one gorgeous, a perfect example of an AR-176. 17"H x 12-1/2"W x 10-1/2"D. $849.00. (1600346)

 

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson started producing phonographs in 1915 in New York City, and is still producing products today. Emerson has made phonographs, radios, televisions, air conditioners, and later on it made refrigerators, computers, defibrillators, CD players and VCRs. The R-158 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,police) set. It was offered with a TV band at one time as well. Blake started the chassis restore by replacing all of the capacitors. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio cable were installed. The radio has very good sensitivity across the dial, and performs with nice tone and plenty of volume. Gary refinished the rosewood and walnut cabinet with the best products. This is an Ingraham cabinet and the Ingraham badge is present. The unique cabinet is accented with two brass strips that cross over the top and down the front of the set. The radio has the original dial with a new clear dial cover, knobs, grille cloth and speaker. Gary finished with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. A really nice looking and performing set for your collection. 15"W x 9-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. $499.00. (1600272)

 

FADA 366-T "Flash-O-Matic" (1937)

FADA 366-T "Flash-O-Matic" (1937)

There is a lot of confusion as to who owned and/or ran FADA Radio and Electric Corporation. Frank D'Andrea was involved with both companies, FADA, and Andrea. But there is information that Jacob Marks ran FADA until 1955. Either way, Andrea became FADA at some point. The 366T is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. It had an electric preset system with six frequency presets that could be selected on a panel on the chassis. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. An input for external devices, a safety fuse, a new power cord and antenna lead were installed. Gary stripped the Walnut and Mahogany Ingraham-designed cabinet. Gary's cabinet refinishing is unsurpassed, and he ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, chassis and speaker are original, and a crystal clear dial cover from Mark Palmquist was installed. The lights are for indicating the presets. Turn the band switch to automatic and the bottom center knob switches the preset stations. This is a very unique, hard-to-find radio. This one is fully functional and ready for your collection! 15"W x 9"H x 9"D. $895.00. (1600391)

 

FADA LA-60 "Fadascope" (1939)

FADA LA-60 "Fadascope" (1939)

The FADA Radio and Electric Company was formed around 1933 in Long Island, New York by Frank D'Andrea. There is some confusion because at about the same time, the Andrea Radio Corporation existed as well, and that FADA was purchased by Jacob Marks and later went bankrupt. It appears that D'Andrea renamed his company FADA at that time. I may write more on this later as we have an Andrea radio ready to sell as well. The LA60 is a five-tube, AM only radio. I could only find this model with either a brown or ivory Bakelite cabinet. Here we have a beautiful Ingrahan-built Walnut and Mahogany set. We replaced all of the capacitors. Checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where necessary. A new power cord and safety fuse were added. This radio will not support an external audio cable. Gary stripped the cabinet and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original chassis, speaker, knobs and back with the internal "loop" antenna are with the radio. A new crystal clear dial cover by Mark Palmquist was installed. This is a one-of-a-kind radio and is complete and ready to play. The price is right on this beautiful unique set. Make it yours! 14"W x 9"H x 8"D. $479.00. (1600388)

 

Grunow 550 "Chromefront" (1934)

Grunow 550 "Chromefront" (1934)

Starting in 1928 in Chicago, Grigsby-Grunow produced the famous and high performing Majestic brand radios. They hired the brightest engineering talent available and became one of the most prolific radio and tube manufacturing companies of the time. In spite of the depression in 1929, Majestic radios were very successful and were even distributed in Europe and Africa. By 1931, Mr. Grunow started General Household Utilities Co. and produced radios under the Grunow name. The 550 is a five-tube, AM only, AC/DC radio. The chassis was completely rebuilt using modern capacitors. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and antenna lead were installed. An external audio cable is not available for this AC/DC set. Most of the finish is original (restored) except that Gary did redo the top. The original knobs and speaker are with the radio. A reproduction of the original cloth was installed. The chrome is in perfect condition, and the radio performs perfectly! This seldom seen early Grunow is ready to grace your collection... make it yours! 12"W x 8"H x 5-1/2"D. $749.00. (1600389)

 

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson Bell started radio production in Los Angeles, CA in 1926. Herb Bell began the business with his brother Elmer. Gilfillan made the chassis and Elmer made the cabinets. At one time or another, the whole family was involved in the business, including their father Anton. In 1929, Herb became partners with Mr. Jackson, and the company ceased operations in 1933. The model 62 is a six-tube, AM only radio. The radio had been restored by the previous owner, and Blake checked it out making sure it met our standards. A period-correct cloth power cord was installed. An audio cable is not available for this radio. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet. He finished the radio with a satin finish. The radio is gorgeous and has the original knobs and grille cloth. Also present is the often-missing "velvet tone" label located on the lower front of the radio. I think this tag is found only on the Fleur-de-Lis model. Other designs are the Swan, Tulip, Sunburst, Peacock, and the iconic Peter pan. If you are looking for a Fleur-de-Lis for your collection, it would be difficult to find one better than this one. 15"H x 13"W x 8-1/2"D. $699.00. (1600303)

 

Jackson-Bell 62 "Swan" (1930)

Jackson-Bell 62 "Swan" (1930)

Jackson-Bell was a Los Angeles radio manufacturer that started radio production in 1926. The company ceased operations in 1933, but not before creating some very iconic radios. The Peter Pan, Swan, Tulip and Sunrise just to name a few. The Jackson-Bell 62 is a six-tube, AM only TRF set. It has great sensitivity across the AM dial. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The tubes and resisters have been checked and replaced where necessary. A safety fuse and a new cloth power cord were installed. An external input is available by request at an additional charge. The walnut with maple trim cabinet was stripped and refinished to a gorgeous semi-gloss finish. The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the radio. This is a beautiful example of the collectable "Swan" model, perfect for that perfect collection! 15"H x 12-1/2"W x 8"D. $699.00. (1600373)

 

Motorola 6-T (1938)

Motorola 6-T (1938)

Paul and Joseph Galvin started the "Galvin Manufacturing Corporation" in Chicago in 1928, and by 1929 started producing car radios. The used the brand name Motorola, and by 1937 introduced a line of home radios and Iwo-way receivers. The 6-T is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. The capacitors have all been replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes have been checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, antenna lead, safety fuse and audio input have been installed. The cabinet was stripped of it's old finish and redone using the highest quality products. The final process was a few coats of lacquer producing a gorgeous "piano" finish. This is a large radio has an eight-inch speaker with impressive volume and tone. The unique dial selector produces a different dial for each band, much like a "robot dial" function. The wood knobs, chassis and speaker are original. This rare, unique Motorola is ready to go...and will be quite a conversation piece to present in your collection. 21"W x 12"H x 10"D. $995.00. (1600363)

 

Norco 160 (1935)

Norco 160 (1935)

Norco (Northwestern Radio Manufacturing Company) was founded in 1921 in Portland, Oregon by Charles Austin. He initially produced early TRF radios, but is famous for creating Oregon's first broadcast radio station (7XF). Later in 1930, he created Oregon's first short wave Police Radio station. He was also selling super-het radios made by Remler and Mission Bell with the Norco name on them. The Norco 160 is five-tube, three-band (AM,SW,Police) radio. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors have been checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord and external audio cable were installed. The walnut cabinet was completely stripped, grain-filled and painted. The set was finished with a hard lacquer "piano" finish, then hand-polished. The radio has the original badging, knobs, speaker, chassis, and a reproduction grille cloth. This is only the second Norco radio offered on the Radio Attic. I know we all use the word "rare" frequently, but in this case it truly applies! 17"H x 16"W x 10"D. $599.00. (1600367)

 

Philco 90 Cathedral (1932)

Philco 90 Cathedral (1932)

Again we have the classic Philco 90 designed by Edward Combs. These radios are large and heavy to today's standards. Despite that the Philco 90 was referred to as a "midget" radio, much smaller and offered a much more attractive design. In the 1920s and early '30s the only radios available were the "coffin" style and large, heavy consoles. The model 90 also used the new, better performing superheterodyne technology which was eventually used by all radio manufacturers. There is a four-step tone control for better control over the radio's tone. We went through the radio replacing all of the capacitors. Checked all of the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. We installed a new cloth power cord, a safety fuse, new antenna lead and an external input that produces plenty of volume. This radio was aligned, and has wonderful tone and volume with great sensitivity across the dial. Gary refinished with a gorgeous semi-gloss with a nice cabinet that has great veneer. The radio retains its original speaker and knobs. We installed a new reproduction grille cloth. It's an awesome radio, beautifully restored and ready to compliment your collection. 18-1/2"H x 17-1/2"W x 12"D. $995.00. (1600382)

 

Pilot 183 (1935)

Pilot 183 (1935)

Pilot Electric Manufacturing Company was founded in Brooklyn NY, by Isidor Goldberg in 1922. The company had several businesses, located in New York, Long Island and Massachusetts. They made early TRF sets and tubes. Pilot radios were also manufactured in England and Italy for the European market prior to WWII. The Pilot 183 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. The capacitors were replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, auxiliary input and antenna lead were installed. The cabinet has Walnut, Maple, Australian Laurel and Zebrawood veneers. Gary refinished it to a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and speaker. A period-correct grille cloth was installed. Pilot radios of this quality are very hard to find, and are a great addition to any serious collection. Make this one yours today! 16"H x 13"W x 9"D. $895.00. (1600370)

 

RCA 118 "Globetrotter" (1934)

NEW!

RCA 118 "Globetrotter" (1934)

In 1934, RCA introduced its new "Magic Brain" technology, which had a tuned RF stage and used the new pentagram converters, the 6A7 tube in this version. Another feature was the coarse/fine tuning, which was utilized by pulling out the tuning knob. The RCA 118 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new Mylar caps. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse and external audio cable were added. The cabinet has been restored and has a nice "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, grille cloth, speaker and chassis are with the radio. This early super-het is an excellent performer, with lots of volume and great sensitivity across the dial. There was a Canadian version and an American version. This is the latter, which has the fancier dial escutcheon. This is a wonderful RCA that would grace anyone's collection! 17-1/2"H x 14-1/2"W x 10"D. $799.00. (1600395)

 

RCA 128 Tombstone (1935)

RCA 128 Tombstone (1935)

RCA designed and manufactured some great radios in the 1930's. Even though RCA had a stranglehold on the industry, controlling patents for TRF and Superheterodyne radios, a few companies were given permission to utilize the patents, most notably the Gilfillan Brothers in Los Angeles. A few other companies were allowed to use the patents, but they had to meet some strict standards and manufacture their radios in the Gilfillan factory. This six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) with its new "magic brain" circuitry, which was basically tuned RF with VCA, and a gorgeous cabinet design was a great seller for RCA. This radio has a ton of volume and a tone control with wonderful fidelity through an 8-inch speaker. We went in and replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked, replacing where necessary. A safety fuse was added along with an external audio cable and a new power cord. Gary did a complete restoration on the cabinet. The Walnut is gorgeous with a "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, speaker and grille cloth are original. This big beautiful radio can be in your collection in a matter of days! 20"H x 17"W x 11"D. $999.00. (1600393)

 

Sentinel 293W (1946)

Sentinel 293W (1946)

The Sentinel Radio Corp. was located in Evanston, Illinois, and manufactured radios, televisions and phonographs from 1930 to 1957. Some brands were Erla, Wings and Musicaire which were sold in Coast to Coast stores. This six-tube, AM only Bakelite radio has had all of the capacitors replaced, along with resistors and tubes checked and replaced as needed. The radio utilizes an internal loop antenna and receives the AM band with sensitivity and volume. The case has no cracks and has been polished. A really nice radio at a great price! 11-1/2"W x 7-1/2"H x 6"D. $139.00. (1600140)

 

Silvertone 3869 (1938)

Silvertone 3869 (1938)

They are some models of radios where one can't find much information, and this Silvertone is one of them. What I do know is that it was made by Mission Bell, who was a Los Angeles company. I am also going to guess that it was made in the Gilfillan factory. One thing I have noticed is that a lot of Gilfillan chassis bolts come up from the bottom of the cabinet through the chassis and are fastened by a nut on TOP of the chassis. This is the case with this radio. The 3869 is a six-tube, AM only, AC radio. It has plenty of volume and good selectivity across the dial. The chassis restoration was done by a known radio guy in Oregon. The capacitors were all replaced, the resistors and tubes checked and replaced where needed. A new antenna lead was installed and I put an audio cable in for your external devise. The cabinet is original (restored). The knobs, grille cloth and speaker are all original to the radio. The Art Deco dial is in perfect condition and lights up nicely. This is a good-looking walnut cabinet and a very good performer. This radio will give you many years of listening pleasure and is priced to sell! 14"W x 8"H x 7"D. $399.00. (1600300)

 

Stewart-Warner R-110AT Tombstone (1933)

Stewart-Warner R-110AT Tombstone (1933)

Stewart-Warner was founded in 1905 in Chicago, and by 1912 produced a speedometer that was used in the Ford Model T. As well as vehicle instruments, they manufactured radios and refrigerators among other products. Here is a radio you don't see very often. There were several different radios offered with the 110 series chassis. This one was designated R-110AT, the "T" stands for twin speakers. This ten-tube, three-band (SB, SWx2) radio had other features like a noise suppression circuit, AVC, and push-pull audio, all very innovative for 1933. Blake went through the chassis replacing all of the capacitors, checked all of the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. He added a new cord, safety fuse and a cable to use an external device. An alignment was done making this radio a strong performer across the dial. Gary stripped the Walnut and Mahogany cabinet. He used the highest quality paint and grain fillers, ending up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. All of the knobs are original, and Blake installed a new, period-correct grille cloth. 16"W x 13"H x 12"D. $995.00. (1600350)

 

Western Air Patrol 66 (1938)

NEW!

Western Air Patrol 66 (1938)

George Pepperdine started Western Auto Supply of California in 1925 in Los Angeles. His radios were initially made by Gilfillan, and later Patterson, and were sold under the brand Western Air Patrol. In 1939, he sold Western Auto Supply to Gambles, ending the Western Air Patrol brand. The model 66 is a seven-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, audio input and antenna lead were installed. The radio has good sensitivity across the stationized dial, and is a very good performer. An interesting and unique feature is a rear-facing speaker. Gary completely stripped the old finish off the radio, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, speaker, chassis, back and grille cloth. A new dial cover from Mark Palmquist was added. This rare Western Air Patrol radio is absolutely gorgeous, a unique addition to anyone's collection! 15-1/2"W x 10"H x 9"D. $695.00. (1600397)

 

Zenith 5-R-216 "Cube" (1938)

Zenith 5-R-216 "Cube" (1938)

The Zenith "Cube" radios were very popular and great sellers for the company. They started a trend with other manufacturers producing their own cube radios. Silvertone, Stewart-Warner, Detrola and others all had their version of the cube. The cube design is still very popular with collectors today. Zenith had seven cube designs and the 5-R-216 was their entry level cube radio. A five-tube, AM-only AC set, it's still a very good radio with good sensitivity and volume. All of the capacitors were replaced with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse and an audio cable to access an external device were installed. The walnut cabinet was completely restored, and it's gorgeous. Most of Zenith's radios had "piano" lacquer finishes, and this cube has that "factory fresh" look. We have the original knobs, chassis and side-mounted speaker. A period-correct grille cloth was installed. Here is yet another Zenith "Cube" that belongs in someone's collection...could that be you? 12"H x 10"W x 9-1/2"D. $499.00. (1600369)

 

Zenith 5-S-327 "Racetrack" Tombstone (1939)

Zenith 5-S-327 "Racetrack" Tombstone (1939)

Zenith produced several models of radios in the 1930's that were great sellers for the company at the time, and over the years, certain models had "staying power" and collectors coveted them for their design and workmanship. The 5-3-319 "Racetrack" radio, named for its oval dial, was one such radio. The dial was used in a few models, the rarest being the radio we show here today, the tombstone version of the "Racetrack" radio. The 5-S-327 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. The capacitors have been replaced with new, Mylar equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse, antenna lead and audio input were installed. The radio has great tone and volume, coupled with lots of sensitivity across the dial. The cabinet was stripped, sanded and grain-filled. The final finish is a beautiful, polished "piano" lacquer. The radio has its original knobs, speaker, chassis and grille cloth. This is the first tombstone Racetrack we have found, and it's been restored and is ready to grace your collection! 16"H x 11-1/2"W x 7-1/2"D. $699.00. (1600357)

 

Zenith 6-D-628 (1942)

Zenith 6-D-628 (1942)

The 6-D-628 was manufactured in 1942 and was one of the last radios Zenith produced before the war. The "D" designation identified the set as AC/DC set operating at 110 volts. The AC/DC sets had no transformer, but the rectifier tube acted as a transformer with DC output and tapped for the dial lamps. This radio was the big brother of the 6-D-525, known in 1941 as the very popular "Toaster" model. The 6-D-628 is a six-tube, AM only set. It produces a lot of volume and picks up stations all across the dial utilizing the "wave magnet" internal loop antenna, which works quite well. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, he checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. A new power cord and audio cable were added. Gary refinished the walnut Art Deco cabinet with his usual mastery, ending up with "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original brown knobs and speaker. We added a new period correct grille cloth, a new dial cover and a new reproduction back. This radio is seldom seen, possibly due to lower production numbers right before the war. Nice piece for the Zenith collector, and just a real beauty for any collection! 13"W x 7-1/2"H x 7"D. $499.00. (1600343)

 

Zenith 6-S-330 "Stars and Stripes" (1939)

NEW!

Zenith 6-S-330 "Stars and Stripes" (1939)

Zenith had several models that were called "Stars and Stripes" or "Stars and Bars" due to the two different "star" designs on the brass dial bezel. Some folks have said it was a patriotic thing that Zenith did, but I actually have never found proof that it was a factory deal. The 6-S-330 is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. It featured the medium size black dial, and had a lot of the features found on the larger dialed radios. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord, external audio cable and antenna lead were installed. Gary stripped and refinished the Walnut cabinet, ending up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, chassis and speaker are original. We installed a period-correct reproduction grille cloth. This Zenith performs well with great sensitivity across the dial. There is plenty of volume and good tone control. This popular model with the "Stars and Stripes" bezel doesn't show up that often. This is a perfect example, and it's ready for your collection! 18"H x 13-1/2"W x 9-1/2"D. $899.00. (1600394)

 

Zenith 705 (1934)

NEW!

Zenith 705 (1934)

In 1933, FDR had been elected president as the country was experiencing a severe depression. Unlike most companies, Zenith had a huge surplus of cash, and produced 125 models, the 200, 400, 500 and 600 model series for 1933, up from just 25 the year before. Several models were carried over to 1934, and the 700 series radios, called the "Challenger" series came out. The 705 is a six-tube, AM only, AC powered radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. We then checked the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and a new antenna lead. The radio has good sensitivity across the dial and plays with good tone and plenty of volume. Gary stripped the burl walnut and mahogany cabinet. He ended up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, dial scale, speaker and chassis. A beautiful "mantle" radio (Zenith didn't make many) to grace your collection. 15-1/2"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. $649.00. (1600396)
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About Joe's Radio Shop

Shipping

At Joe's Radio Shop we do everything in our power to make sure our radios are packed with the utmost of care and protection.  We use double-sided boxes lined with Styrofoam creating a box within a box.  The radio has bubble wrap placed inside to protect the tubes, then double wrapped in bubble wrap and placed on packing peanuts on the bottom of the box.  The sides around the bubble wrapped radio are filled with packing peanuts and a piece of Styrofoam is placed on top of the radio and the box is then sealed.  Our larger radios and consoles have the speakers removed and are professionally packed by Diversified Packing and shipped via Greyhound.  We have never had any damage to any of our shipped radios.  We will ship radios with the company that offers the best rate; Fed-Ex, UPS, USPS and DHL are the preferred carriers.  Let us know if you have a preference for shipping.  Packages are shipped within three business days of payment.  Consoles and large radios may take a little longer due to a more involved packing process.  Tracking numbers will be provided to you, and we track the packages as well.

Payment

Joe's Radio Shop accepts payment through PayPal, credit cards (we use the Square, which requires a 3.75% fee) and checks.  Payment plus shipping must be deposited before we ship your radio to you.  Checks must clear our bank before shipping.  Joe's Radio Shop will not provide or sell your personal information to anyone.  Credit card information is shredded and discarded after the charge is made and deposited.  Upon ordering, you will receive an invoice via email with cost plus shipping charges.  A receipt will arrive with the radio.

Don't like the price? Give us an offer!

Joe's Radio Shop return policy:

We accept returns, but we would first try to resolve any issues and make sure your radio is functioning as it should.  A few guidelines for vintage tube radios to function properly:
1. Most radios need an antenna to function properly.  10-20 feet of wire connected to the "A" lug in the back of the chassis, which we will provide to you.  Some radios have internal antennas, or "loops."  For the most part, these radios should receive broadcast or "AM" stations in your area.
2. Multiple band radios that have 1-3 short wave bands will also need plenty of antenna.  There isn't much going on these day with short wave.  Many short wave stations have moved to satellite or the internet.  There are a few out there, and a good antenna is needed.  Ask us about antennas; we can describe how to make them to use at your home.  Try to place your radio on an outside wall, the reception will be better, especially with console radios.  Police and aviation (now UHF) bands no longer function in today's world.
3. There are things in a household that can cause static and interference.  Computers, fluorescent lighting, lighting potentiometers (dimmer switch), microwave ovens, digital TV and possibly your wi-fi system.  Try to keep the radio out of proximity to these devices.
4. Running the radio for long periods of time can can them to overheat causing damage.

Please contact us within seven days for a possible return.  E-mail us at joesradioshop1@gmail.com or phone us at 503-209-8414.  Our radios come with a six  month guarantee from the purchase date.  Any electrical damage or failure will be repaired free of cost minus materials and shipping.  If there is damage from shipping, the claim has to go through the shipper.  If we determine the damage is the shipper or buyers fault, we can negotiate a repair price.  If an issue can't be resolved to the buyer's liking, we will offer a full refund minus shipping and insurance.  If the buyer pays the shipper directly, the buyer assumes all responsibility for insurance settlements due to damage while in transit.  When shipping a radio back to us, please follow our packing guidelines listed under Shipping.  If the radio is improperly packed, the refund will be denied.



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