Joe Millward's Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2017"

the Radio Attic


 

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My Radio Attic is having a SALE!

 

Airline 62-329 (1937)

Airline 62-329 (1937)

I've mentioned this before: Montgomery Wards sold millions of products without manufacturing anything! Radios were no exception. Just on the Radio Museum alone over 2,000 models are listed. They did succeed as they used very good radio manufacturers and sold quality products. The list of manufacturers of Airline radios is long. Wells-Gardner, Belmont, Davidson-Haynes, US Radio Corp. and Kingston Radio. Here is a list of the manufacturers' abbreviations used on many labels of Airline radios: AA, BR, CB, CCB, GAA, GHM, GSE, GSL, GWM, HA, JB, JP, KP, KR, WG and others! The 62-329 is a nine-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio. The set utilizes two 6F6 tubes for push-pull audio through an 8-inch speaker, which enhances the volume noticeably. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse, antenna lead and an audio input cable were installed. Gary stripped off the old finish, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, dial scale, chassis and speaker were retained. This radio is a great performer across the dial with plenty of volume and tone control and a bright and active tuning eye tube. This large, unique Airline can be a great addition to your collection, and will offer years of use. It's ready to go to a new home! 23"W x 12-1/2"H x 9"D. $749.00. (1600524)

 

Airline 62-367 "Teledial" (1937)

Airline 62-367 "Teledial" (1937)

In the 1930's, radios were the cutting edge of new electronic innovation for consumers of that generation. Competition was fierce, so manufacturers were constantly improving the radios and adding features. The Teledial was a quick way to dial in your favorite stations without having to manually turn a dial and search. Most of them were set up much like a rotary dial on telephones, and made the tuning process much easier and faster. All the radio manufacturers at one time or another featured Teledials, soon replaced by electric selection and motorized dials. The 62-367 is a seven-tube, two-band (SB+SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and external audio cable were installed. The Teledial is backlit and the eye tube is bright and active. Gary stripped the Walnut cabinet and skillfully applied lacquer for a gorgeous "piano" finish. The set has original knobs, chassis and speaker. A unique and beautiful radio which will grace anyone's collection! 23-1/2"W x 11"H x 12-1/2"D. $795.00. (1600456)

 

Airline 62-425 "Indian Head" (1937)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Airline 62-425 "Indian Head" (1937)

Here we have a very familiar, small Airline radio dubbed the "Indian Head" due to the cutout for the speaker being shaped like an Indian facing left with a feather head band on the right, and so on. This is a five-tube, AM-only radio manufactured for Airline by Belmont. We went through this radio with our usual replacing of all capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. We installed a new power cord, safety fuse, audio input cable and antenna lead. Gary did a great job on the refinish, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are with the set. A lot of collectors have one in their collections, and this radio is beautiful and would look good on your shelf! 10-1/2"W x 7-1/2"H x 5-3/4"D. Was $425.00, now $399.00. (1600478)

 

American Bosch 660-T (1936)

American Bosch 660-T (1936)

American Bosch, a German company that produced primarily magnetos, opened a plant in Springfield Mass. in 1911. By 1920, they were producing 50% of all electrical starter parts. They started radio manufacturing in the early 1930's. When WWII started, they produced aircraft magnetos. By 1942, production had quadrupled. The 660-T is a seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a safety fuse, new power cord, antenna lead and an audio input cable. The radio has "beam of light" tuning with a big, colorful glass dial and a tuned RF stage for exceptional reception. Gary stripped the cabinet, and utilizing catalyzed lacquer, ended up with a gorgeous "piano" finish. The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the set. This radio doesn't show up very often, so it's an interesting piece for your collection. You rarely see them at this level of restoration. 23"W x 13"H x 11"D. $849.00. (1600486)

 

Aria 175 (1938)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Aria 175 (1938)

Aria was one of a hundred brands built by Detrola, and was sold in Wieboldt Department Stores of Chicago. Detrola also supplied Western Auto (Truetone) and Sears (Silvertone), just to name two, with thousands of radios. They were the most productive company in the USA, providing radios for department stores and small retailers. The chassis used in the Aria was used in other radios (Detrola 175E) and consoles under different sellers. The 175 is a eight-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio. It produces a ton of volume with push-pull audio through a rebuilt Rola eight-inch speaker. The radio features motorized tuning which functions perfectly. The capacitors have been replaced, and all of the resistors and tubes have been checked and replaced where necessary. A safety fuse, audio cable, new tuning eye, antenna lead and a new power cable have been installed. Gary stripped the radio and refinished with a "piano" hand-rubbed lacquer finish. This dark Walnut set is elegant and gorgeous at the same time! An excellent example of the Aria version of this Detrola-made radio. 21"W x 12"H x 9"D. Was $949.00, now $849.00. (1600454)

 

Arvin 417 "Rhythm Baby" (1936)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Arvin 417 "Rhythm Baby" (1936)

Arvin was based in Columbus, Indiana and was the radio brand name manufactured by Noblitt-Sparks. There were four companies with the first starting on 1919 as Indianapolis Air Pump, to car radios in 1933 to home radios in 1935 as Noblitt-Sparks and Arvin. They created "families" of radios, starting with the "Rhythm Series" in 1936 and the "Phantom Series" in 1937. Many of these radios are highly collectable, with the "Rhythm King" being one of the hardest radios to find. There were several "Rhythm" series radios...The King, Queen, Master, Junior, Maid, Bell and Baby, which we have here. The 417 is a four-tube, two-band (AM,police) radio. The capacitors have all been replaced. We checked resistors and tubes and replaced where needed. A safety fuse and polarized power cord were installed. The radio plays well using about 10 feet of antenna, which we have provided. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet and came out with a "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, speaker and chassis are original. This rare radio is gorgeous and a wonderful addition to anyone's collection! 12"H x 9"W x 7"D. Was $599.00, now $499.00. (1600455)

 

Atwater Kent 84 (1932)

Atwater Kent 84 (1932)

When cathedral radios were first offered in the early 1930's, they were referred to as midget or compact radios. They were so much smaller than the console and large "coffin" style radios that preceded them. By today's standards they are quite large and heavy. The model 84 does have a darker "gothic" look, but also has a beauty of its own. The graceful arched and pointed top is graced with simple side moldings. This six-tube, AM-only radio plays loud and clear with great tone and sensitivity through the original 8-inch speaker. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a safety fuse, new antenna lead and an audio input cable. The switch on the back of the chassis is a tone control. Gary Marvin's comment on the cabinet: "This is about the nicest AK that I have ever had and I wouldn't have refinished it, except someone already had. There were no repairs to the cabinet and I refinished it with grain filler, toner and satin lacquer." The chassis, speaker, knobs and grille cloth are original. This beautiful and great performing radio is ready for your collection. Don't miss out on this highly collectable Atwater Kent! They aren't making them any more folks! 19-1/2"H x 15-1/2" W x 10"D. $795.00. (1600532)

 

Climax (model unknown, 1932?)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Climax (model unknown, 1932?)

Most of us that have tried to "research" early Climax radios know there isn't much on the internet about them. Most of the info is a guessing game, and comparing them to known models. I found a few models that were similar to this radio, probably manufactured early 1930's. This radio was originally a five-tube, AM only TRF set. All that remains from the original chassis is the transformer and tuner. We rebuilt this set into an AA5 radio with a ton of features. We installed a solid state AM tuner, built a 5K3 amplifier similar to the same amp found in small Fender guitar amps. This chassis has a contour tone control, a brand new 6-inch speaker, multiple 1/4" outputs for an external speakers. This radio functions perfectly as a tube radio, but can also be used to play guitar and other instruments through. Gary stripped the cabinet and came out with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. This radio would appeal to a collector as a functioning, rare Climax radio, but also to musicians and hi-fi enthusiasts with its audio versatility. We included a 1/4" input with cable adapter to access your external devices. Please call us for more info on this unique radio! Was $699.00, now $599.00. (1600472)

 

Crosley 167 "Dual Fiver" (1934)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Crosley 167 "Dual Fiver" (1934)

Powell Crosley started The Crosley Manufacturing Company in Cincinnati in 1921 and quickly became the number one seller of low-cost radios. By the early 1930's, they were replaced by Philco as the low-cost leader. They later produced home appliances, automobiles, and produced products for the war effort. The "Dual Fiver" cathedral came out in 1934, and was followed by a later production model, a tombstone design which we have here. The "Dual Fiver" is a five-tube, two-band (AM,Police) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. We installed a safety fuse, polarized power cord, audio input cable and a new antenna lead. Gary did his usual masterful cabinet work. The Mahogany, Zebrawood and Birch veneers are beautifully refinished, and show the highlights of these gorgeous veneers. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are with the set. The correct green-lit dial is in perfect condition. This later-production "Dual Fiver" is hard to find, and never in this pristine condition! 14"H x 11"W x 8"D. Was $649.00, now $595.00. (1600452)

 

Crosley 615 "Cruiser" (1936)

Crosley 615 "Cruiser" (1936)

The Crosley Radio Corporation was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1921 by Powell Crosby. He produced radios at a high volume, and copied the "assembly line" concept, earning him the moniker "The Henry Ford of Radio." He later manufactured appliances, cars and contributed the "proximity fuse" during the war. The 615 is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, antenna lead and a new power cord were installed. A full alignment was performed, making this radio a strong performer across the dial. Gary stripped and refinished the gorgeous Walnut cabinet, ending up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The chassis, speaker and knobs are original, and a new crystal-clear dial cover was added. This radio would be a wonderful addition to any collection and can be yours in a matter of days! 16"H x 12"W x 9"D. $699.00. (1600403)

 

Detrola 159 (1937)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Detrola 159 (1937)

Detrola was founded in 1931 by John J. Ross in Detroit Michigan. They started making their own radios, using outside sources for their cabinets. The company grew rather quickly and soon 90% of production was for brands such as Aria, Sears and Roebuck (Silvertone), Western Auto (Truetone) and many brands for other businesses. Production ceased in 1948 over union issues. The 159 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) and is basically an AC/DC radio utilizing an autotransformer. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. Replaced resistors and tubes where needed. A power cord, antenna lead and safety fuse were installed. The radio receives stations on both bands and has plenty of volume. Gary stripped the cabinet and did some nice toner work and ended up with a "piano" lacquer finish. This seldom seen Detrola is a nice entry level radio for your collection, or a unique Detrola for someone looking for something different to add to their collection. 14"W x 6-1/2"H x 6"D. Was $499.00, now $449.00. (1600521)

 

Emerson BF-204 (1938)

NEW!

Emerson BF-204 (1938)

I believe I've started this before...Emerson has a couple of hundred models and most of them utilize Ingraham cabinets. A clock maker by trade, the companies cabinetry was some of the best. Their use of angles and shapes with gorgeous veneers was legendary. The BF-204 is no exception. Using Australian Laurel and Walnut veneers with some beautiful inlay work, this is a special cabinet, a restored original by Gary Marvin. The BF-204 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and antenna lead were added. The radio receives local stations with great tone and plenty of volume. Gary restored the original cabinet and it's gorgeous! The radio has the original knobs, chassis, speaker, dial scale and back. The dial cover is crystal clear, and the Ingraham and Emerson badging is present. A truly beautiful radio with a great price ready to be in your collection! 12-1/2"W x 8-3/4"H x 7"D. $449.00. (1600541)

 

Emerson BJ-210 (1938)

Emerson BJ-210 (1938)

Here's another classic Emerson with a stylish Ingraham cabinet. The black and red vinyl inlay around the bottom certainly gives this radio some character, perhaps a simple identity from several Emerson models that are very similar in size. The BJ-210 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,Police) AC/DC radio. The BJ is a chassis designation telling us that it was manufactured by Belmont. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. We added a new power cord, safety fuse and antenna lead. (We do not install audio input cables on AC/DC radios due to electrical shock hazard) This radio performs well across the dial with plenty of volume. Gary did a great job stripping the old finish and applied a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are present. This is a restored Emerson that plays well and is priced right. This radio should perform well for a long time! 14"W x 9-1/2"H x 8-1/4"D. $449.00. (1600490)

 

Emerson L-141 "Cube" (1937)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Emerson L-141 "Cube" (1937)

The Emerson Phonograph Company was formed in New York City in 1918. They started making radios in 1924, and produced the first phonograph/radio combination. By WWII, it held one sixth of the U.S. radio market. With the advent of television, their sales more than doubled by 1950. Emerson is still in business today. The L-141 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW-disabled) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with Mylar equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new antenna lead, audio input cable and a new power cord were installed. The Ingraham cabinet has Burl Walnut and Walnut veneers with maple and ebony inlays. Gary stripped the cabinet, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original chassis, speaker and knobs are with the set, as are the Emerson and Ingraham badging. The "cube" design was a rare radio for Emerson, but they wanted to get in on the popularity and sales of the cubes. This is one beautiful radio for any collection, and a wonderful addition to Emerson collections. 14"H x 11"W x 8"D. Was $895.00, now $799.00. (1600510)

 

Emerson R-158 (1938)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Emerson R-158 (1938)

Emerson started producing phonographs in 1915 in New York City, and is still producing products today. Emerson has made phonographs, radios, televisions, air conditioners, and later on it made refrigerators, computers, defibrillators, CD players and VCRs. The R-158 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,police) set. It was offered with a TV band at one time as well. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. The radio has the original power cord, and a safety fuse, antenna lead and audio cable were installed. The radio has very good sensitivity across the dial, and performs with nice tone and plenty of volume. Gary refinished the Rosewood and Walnut cabinet with the best products. This is an Ingraham cabinet and the Ingraham badge is present. The unique cabinet is accented with two brass strips that cross over the top and down the front of the set. The radio has the original dial with a clear dial cover, and the chassis, knobs, and speaker are original. Gary finished with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. A really nice looking and performing set for your collection. 15"W x 9-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. Was $499.00, now $449.00. (1600515)

 

Firestone 3-7403-7 "The Strafford" (1941)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Firestone 3-7403-7 "The Strafford" (1941)

I really like Firestone "Air Chief" table radios, and I have several in my collection. It features a beautiful and unique Ingraham cabinet, and is one of the more popular models with collectors. This six-tube, two-band (SB, SW) radio, was the first one I collected. I went through this radio and replaced all of the capacitors, checked and replaced resistors and tubes, installed a new power cord, dial cover and added an audio input. The radio was aligned and performs strong across the dial, utilizing an internal loop antenna. Steve stripped the cabinet and did some really nice highlighting of the stripe around the cabinet. The final result was a gorgeous piano finish. The radio has the original knobs and back. This beautifully designed radio is ready to add to anyone's collection. 14"W x 8"H x 8"D. Was $599.00, now $499.00. (1600409)

 

General Electric Junior S-22x "Clock Radio" (1931)

ON SALE
until
August 16

General Electric Junior S-22x "Clock Radio" (1931)

The S-22x is an early superheterodyne set, probably the first one GE offered to the consumer. Prior to the "new" superset process, most radios were TRF (tuned radio frequency). Superheterodyne radios were designed by Edward Howard Armstrong, who sold the patent to GE. The only way you could get a superhet was from RCA, Westinghouse, GE or build one yourself! The S-22x is an eight-tube, AM only radio. With a matched pair of 45 audio tubes and a 10-inch speaker, the set had decent fidelity and volume for an early superset. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where needed. The Telechron clock works and keeps good time. We installed a new power cord, safety fuse and an audio input. We also added a nice on board antenna that works nicely with plenty of wire for the antenna lead. Gary did a fantastic job refinishing the cabinet, ending up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, speaker, "faux" handle and chassis are present. A new dial scale was installed. This chassis was used in a few other models: S-22 (same radio without the clock), RCA Superette R-7 Graybill Midget GB-8 and the Canadian Westinghouse version of the "Columaire" grandfather clock radio. This very rare and desirable radio is ready to go and will offer years of performance! This is a big heavy radio (44lbs) and will be packed correctly for shipping. 20"H x 13-1/2"W x 10"D. Was $1,495.00, now $1,195.00. (1600528)

 

General Television "ME" (1938)

ON SALE
until
August 16

General Television "ME" (1938)

Here we have another company where there is very little information available. General Television was founded in New York City in 1932, but then apparently moved to Chicago in 1938. At that time they acquired Climax Radio And Television Corporation, which possibly explains a lot about this radio. From this point on the desirable Climax radios started appearing: The Emerald, Teardrop and the "Angry Face" and others, which brings us to this radio. The schematic I used for this radio was under Climax listed as the ME chassis, which also matched the cabinet and chassis of the "Angry Face." The only difference is the dial, which has the General Television logo on it. My conclusion is that General Television made all of the radios for Climax after 1938. The GTV model ME is an eight-tube, three-band radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio input cable were added. This radio performs well across the dial with a bright tuning eye tube. The dial is in perfect condition and I've never seen another one like it! Gary stripped off the old finish and turned out a gorgeous cabinet. The grille is very unique and ornate, and the "piano" lacquer finish makes this radio pop! The knobs, speaker and chassis are original. This radio is a "one-off" set. If you're looking for a radio no one else has, here you go! 20"W x 12"H x 9"D. Was $1,195.00, now $995.00. (1600537)

 

Grunow 550 "Chromefront" (1934)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Grunow 550 "Chromefront" (1934)

Starting in 1928 in Chicago, Grigsby-Grunow produced the famous and high performing Majestic brand radios. They hired the brightest engineering talent available and became one of the most prolific radio and tube manufacturing companies of the time. In spite of the depression in 1929, Majestic radios were very successful and were even distributed in Europe and Africa. By 1931, Mr. Grunow started General Household Utilities Co. and produced radios under the Grunow name. The 550 is a five-tube, AM only, AC/DC radio. The chassis was completely rebuilt using modern capacitors. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and antenna lead were installed. An external audio cable is not available for this AC/DC set. Most of the finish is original (restored) except that Gary did redo the top. The original knobs and speaker are with the radio. A reproduction of the original cloth was installed. The chrome is in perfect condition, and the radio performs perfectly! This seldom seen early Grunow is ready to grace your collection... make it yours! 12"W x 8"H x 5-1/2"D. Was $699.00, now $599.00. (1600389)

 

Grunow 650 (1934)

Grunow 650 (1934)

In 1933, Grunow Corporation of Chicago merged with U.S. Radio and Television to form General Household Utilities Company. From 1933 on, they continued with the brand Grunow, coming out in 1936 with "Teledial Twelve" nicknamed the "Shirley Temple" as the child star was used in advertising. The model 650 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked, replacing all out-of-tolerance components. An audio input cable, safety fuse and new power cord were installed, along with a new antenna lead wire. The radio was aligned and plays strong across the dial with good sensitivity. Gary stripped the old finish off the cabinet. He refinished the American Walnut veneers using high quality toners and lacquer, ending up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original speaker, knobs, chassis and dial scale are present and we installed a period-correct grille cloth. This is a really nice example of a model 650 and is priced right, ready for your collection! 19-1/2"H x 14"W x 9-1/2"D. $649.00. (1600535)

 

Grunow 750 "World Cruiser" (1935)

Grunow 750 "World Cruiser" (1935)

We have mentioned the bankruptcy and split up in 1932 of Grigsby-Grunow based in Chicago. By the time the model 750 came out, they had recaptured the market with quality radios and exquisite cabinetry. The 750 was Grunow's top-of-the-line table radio in 1935. This large seven-tube, four-band (SB,SWx2,police) beauty sported twin gangs on the AM tuner for greater sensitivity and lots of volume through the original 8-inch Grunow speaker. Their cabinet work played second fiddle to no one, and the 750 is no exception. All of the capacitors were replaced. The resistors and tubes checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, power cord and external audio cable were added. Gary stripped the cabinet and refinished it using the best grain fillers, toners and finished with a "piano" lacquer finish. Notice the book matched Walnut in the front with contrasting colors. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are included. This stunning radio will grace any collection, and it can be yours in a matter of days! 20"H x 16-1/4"W x 12"D. $895.00. (1600508)

 

Howard 375 (1938)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Howard 375 (1938)

In 1923, the Howard Radio Company of Chicago IL, started producing broadcast receivers. They were known for their amateur and military short wave radios. They received a contract from the U.S. Army for communication radios during WWII. They had a license from RCA and made components for Capehart, Silvertone and others. The model 375 is a seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. The tuning eye tube is bright and active. We installed a new power cord, safety fuse and and an input cable for iPhone, Bluetooth etc. Gary did a great job on the Walnut cabinet. He stripped off the old finish and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, speaker and chassis are original. We installed a new reproduction grille cloth. Howard didn't produce large numbers of their radios, so finding one like this doesn't happen very often. If you're looking for a different brand for your collection, this radio would be perfect! 19-1/2"W x 11-1/2"H x 10"D. Was $649.00, now $599.00. (1600488)

 

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson Bell started radio production in Los Angeles, CA in 1926. Herb Bell began the business with his brother Elmer. Gilfillan made the chassis and Elmer made the cabinets. At one time or another, the whole family was involved in the business, including their father Anton. In 1929, Herb became partners with Mr. Jackson, and the company ceased operations in 1933. The model 62 is a six-tube, AM only radio. The radio had been restored by the previous owner, and Blake checked it out making sure it met our standards. A period-correct cloth power cord was installed. An audio cable is not available for this radio. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet. He finished the radio with a satin finish. The radio is gorgeous and has the original knobs and grille cloth. Also present is the often-missing "velvet tone" label located on the lower front of the radio. I think this tag is found only on the Fleur-de-Lis model. Other designs are the Swan, Tulip, Sunburst, Peacock, and the iconic Peter pan. If you are looking for a Fleur-de-Lis for your collection, it would be difficult to find one better than this one. 15"H x 13"W x 8-1/2"D. Was $549.00, now $499.00. (1600303)

 

Majestic 461 "Master Six" (1933)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Majestic 461 "Master Six" (1933)

Grigsby-Grunow of Chicago, IL started to manufacture Majestic radios in 1927. As the depression hit, the company faltered. In 1933, and in an attempt to bolster sales and save the company, they produced a new line of stylish, Art Deco radios, the "Smart Sets." The attempt failed and the company declared bankruptcy later that year. The 461 is a six-tube, AM (police on the upper end of the band) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. the resistors and tubes were replaced where necessary. We installed a safety fuse, new cloth-covered power cord with the original plug, audio input cable and a new antenna lead. The radio is a strong performer with good sensitivity and volume. Gary completely stripped the Walnut cabinet. The set has beautiful book-matched veneer on the front, and he ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and speaker. There aren't many of these sets around anymore, and very few have been offered on the Radio Attic. A unique radio for your collection! 17"H x 13"W x 8-1/2"D. Was $599.00, now $549.00. (1600453)

 

Norco 160 (1935)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Norco 160 (1935)

Norco (Northwestern Radio Manufacturing Company) was founded in 1921 in Portland, Oregon by Charles Austin. He initially produced early TRF radios, but is famous for creating Oregon's first broadcast radio station (7XF). Later in 1930, he created Oregon's first short wave Police Radio station. He was also selling super-het radios made by Remler and Mission Bell with the Norco name on them. The Norco 160 is five-tube, three-band (AM,SW,Police) radio. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors have been checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord and external audio cable were installed. The walnut cabinet was completely stripped, grain-filled and painted. The set was finished with a hard lacquer "piano" finish, then hand-polished. The radio has the original badging, knobs, speaker, chassis, and a reproduction grille cloth. This is only the second Norco radio offered on the Radio Attic. I know we all use the word "rare" frequently, but in this case it truly applies! 17"H x 16"W x 10"D. Was $499.00, now $449.00. (1600367)

 

Pilot 183 (1935)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Pilot 183 (1935)

Pilot Electric Manufacturing Company was founded in Brooklyn NY, by Isidor Goldberg in 1922. The company had several businesses, located in New York, Long Island and Massachusetts. They made early TRF sets and tubes. Pilot radios were also manufactured in England and Italy for the European market prior to WWII. The Pilot 183 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. The capacitors were replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, auxiliary input and antenna lead were installed. The cabinet has Walnut, Maple, Australian Laurel and Zebrawood veneers. Gary refinished it to a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and speaker. A period-correct grille cloth was installed. Pilot radios of this quality are very hard to find, and are a great addition to any serious collection. Make this one yours today! 16"H x 13"W x 9"D. Was $795.00, now $695.00. (1600370)

 

RCA 5T (1936)

RCA 5T (1936)

In 1921, David Sarnoff started RCA as General Manager, and remained until 1970. By 1926, they already controlled the commercial radio industry, buying radio stations, and then formed NBC. Eventually, NBC was broken up into the other networks, ABC and CBS. More on RCA in upcoming ads. The 5T is a five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. We installed a polarized power cord, antenna lead, external audio cable (Bluetooth, iPhone, iPad) and a safety fuse. RCA made great sets, and this radio plays strong and picks up plenty of stations across the dial. Gary stripped the Walnut and Maple veneered cabinet. Using high-quality products and craftsmanship, he ended up with a "piano" lacquer finish. This radio has the original knobs, chassis, copper bezel, dial scale and 8-inch speaker. A new dial cover was installed along with a period-correct reproduction grille cloth. This gorgeous example of an RCA 5T would look perfect in your collection! 16"H x 13"W x 9"D. $579.00. (1600459)

 

RCA 9TX-3 "Little Nipper" (1939)

ON SALE
until
August 16

RCA 9TX-3 "Little Nipper" (1939)

Even with a stranglehold on the radio industry holding all the patents for superheterodyne technology, RCA themselves manufactured pretty good radios. Slowly some companies were able to pay RCA for the right to build super-hets, and eventually the patent ran out and opened the door for many small companies to do the same. The 9TX-3 is a five-tube, AM only, AC/DC radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where necessary. The radio is a good performer across the dial. Gary stripped the old finish off, and ended up with a beautiful "piano" finish on the Walnut cabinet. The original knobs are made of "Beetle" plastic, Catalin and Bakelite. This very unique RCA radio is ready for your collection and is priced right! 9"W x 5"H x 4"D. Was $549.00, now $499.00. (1600398)

 

RCA 16T4 (1940)

ON SALE
until
August 16

RCA 16T4 (1940)

Although general manager David Sarnoff made RCA one of the largest companies in the world, he ran the company with an iron fist. He held the patents for new radio technology and didn't share them. Many small companies couldn't afford to pay the royalties to utilize the technologies. Despite his business techniques, the company pioneered radio and television broadcasting for the world. Their products were top-notch. The 16T4 is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. With five-button electronic tuning, dual tone control for radio and phono input, and a new dual circuit loop antenna, this was one performing radio! We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A safety fuse and new power cord were installed. The radio has a factory phono input that works great with Bluetooth etc. A new addition to Joe's Radio Shop is Steve Tucker, who specializes in cabinet refinishing. Steve stripped the unique Walnut cabinet, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, six inch speaker and chassis are with the set. A unique RCA to add to you collection and is priced right! 19"W x 10"H x 8-1/2"D. Was $549.00, now $499.00. (1600405)

 

RCA 124 (1934)

NEW!

RCA 124 (1934)

Every once and a while we find a unique radio. Their uniqueness and rarity can sometimes be attributed to low production numbers and slow sales. The model 124 was in the 1934 RCA line along with the 128 and 143. I believe the 128 was one of the top sellers that year, and they made a lot of them! Not so with the model 124. I had never seen this model till it showed up on Craigs List in our area, and this is the first one on the Radio Attic. That's how it happens sometimes... The 124 is a six-tube, two band (AM,police). We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. We added a new power cord, safety fuse, antenna lead and audio input cable. The radio is a good performer, receiving stations across the dial with good tone control and plenty of volume. Gary Marvin stripped off the old finish and started with a clean slate. The speaker grille is repwood, and the cabinet is solid Teak and Mahogany woods. The original knobs, dial scale and chassis are in good condition. A period correct speaker and grille cloth are present. If you're looking for a unique and rare radio, this RCA can't be beat! 15-1/2"H x 11-1/2"W x 8-1/2"D. $849.00. (1600542)

 

RCA 128 (1935)

ON SALE
until
August 16

RCA 128 (1935)

RCA designed and manufactured some great radios in the 1930's. Even though RCA had a stranglehold on the industry, controlling patents for TRF and Superheterodyne radios, a few companies were given permission to utilize the patents, most notably the Gilfillan Brothers in Los Angeles. A few other companies were allowed to use the patents, but they had to meet some strict standards and manufacture their radios in the Gilfillan factory. This six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) with its new "magic brain" circuitry, which was basically tuned RF with VCA, and a gorgeous cabinet design was a great seller for RCA. This radio has a ton of volume and a tone control with wonderful fidelity through an 8-inch speaker. We went in and replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked, replacing where necessary. A safety fuse was added along with an external audio input jack and a new power cord. The jack has a switch which allows you to close the radio tuning functions, or access the audio input jack. Gary did a complete restoration on the cabinet. The Walnut is gorgeous with a "piano" lacquer finish. This big, beautiful radio can be in your collection in a matter of days! 20"H x 17"W x 11"D. Was $995.00, now $899.00. (1600527)

 

RCA T10-1 (1936)

RCA T10-1 (1936)

Despite the stranglehold RCA held over the radio industry having ownership of the Superheterodyne patents, the company did manufacture impressive radios. The T10-1 was the top of the line for 1936, and one of the big selling points was the use of the "revolutionary" new metal tubes. "The sign of an up-to-date radio!" Touted as being quieter...they didn't require shielding. The T10-1 is a ten-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. 11-plus watts of push-pull power through an 8-inch speaker, an strong performing set! We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new polarized power cord, safety fuse and audio input for your external device. Gary stripped the Mahogany cabinet and ended up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, chassis and speaker are original. One word describes this radio... impressive! 20"H x 17" W x 14"D. $1,195.00. (1600458)

 

Silvertone 1954 (1935)

Silvertone 1954 (1935)

One of the first radios I bought and restored was a Silvertone model 1954. During this time period, Colonial was manufacturing a lot of the Silvertone models and there were various cabinet makers used as well. These good looking, Art Deco tombstones were great performers and featured one of the first "airplane" motif dials. The 1954 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) AC radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We added a new power cord, safety fuse, antenna lead and an audio input cable for iPhones, Bluetooth etc. An interesting feature is the "airplane" dial turns from green to red when the radio is powered up. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet with his usual mastery, and after sanding and painting came out with a gorgeous catalyzed lacquer finish. The original wooden knobs, chassis, speaker and dial are with the set. Once again, this restored model 1954 is "collection ready" and performs well. 16-1/4"H x 11-3/4"W x 10"D. $679.00. (1600491)

 

Silvertone 4665 (1937)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Silvertone 4665 (1937)

Sears offered the consumer a lot of products. From toothbrushes to entire homes. Most of their products were of a high quality, and the radios they sold were no exception. The cabinets and chassis were manufactured by some of the best radio and furniture manufacturers in America. The 4665 is an eight-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio, and was towards the top of the line in 1937. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, safety fuse, audio input and antenna lead. The radio, performs with lots of volume and tone with great sensitivity across the dial. This radio came from a long-time Seattle collector and has an older, but nice cabinet restoration. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are with the set, and a reproduction grille cloth was added. This beauty has a very similar "tapered" cabinet to the popular model 4465. Wide at the bottom tapering up and is a little narrower at the top. The model 4665 doesn't turn up often, and there has been only one on the Radio Attic. This one is very nice, a unique Silvertone for your collection, and priced right! 21"H x 15"W x 11"D. Was $649.00, now $599.00. (1600401)

 

Silvertone 6230 (1939)

Silvertone 6230 (1939)

Silvertone was the product name of electronics sold by Sears-Roebuck out of Chicago, Illinois. The first radio was offered in 1920 by catalog and later in retail stores. With features like the Ingraham style cabinet (possibly built by Belmont, who manufactured the chassis), tuning eye tube and five-button station, the 6230 was a good seller for Sears. The 6230 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) AC/DC set. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a safety fuse, a new power cord and a new antenna lead. The tuning eye tube us bright and active. Gary stripped the cabinet and refinished using high quality products. Just the right amount of toner and lacquer makes this radio a gem for any collection. We retained the original knobs, speaker and chassis. The dial cover is crystal clear. The radio is priced to sell, so come and get it! 15"W x 9"H x 7"D. $499.00. (1600477)

 

Stewart-Warner Dealers Showroom Album (1933)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Stewart-Warner Dealers Showroom Album (1933)

This album was sent to distributors to tell the story of the new 1933 Stewart-Warner radios. The album tells the story of Stewart-Warner, its important people, factories and models of radios for 1933. It includes description of the new "Magic Dial," which they describe as being "four radios in one." There are pictures and descriptions of consoles, table sets, farm sets and an automobile radio. There are 36 pages in both color and black and white. The album is in very good condition considering its age. There is some wear on the front page and some staining on a few pages, but over-all very nice. This is a must for any Stewart-Warner radio collector! Was $249.00, now $199.00. (1600533)

 

Stewart-Warner R-110AT (1933)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Stewart-Warner R-110AT (1933)

Stewart-Warner was founded in 1905 in Chicago, and by 1912 produced a speedometer that was used in the Ford Model T. As well as vehicle instruments, they manufactured radios and refrigerators among other products. Here is a radio you don't see very often. There were several different radios offered with the 110 series chassis. This one was designated R-110AT, the "T" stands for twin speakers. This ten-tube, three-band (SB, SWx2) radio had other features like a noise suppression circuit, AVC, and push-pull audio, all very innovative for 1933. Blake went through the chassis replacing all of the capacitors, checked all of the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. He added a new cord, safety fuse and a cable to use an external device. An alignment was done making this radio a strong performer across the dial. Gary stripped the Walnut and Mahogany cabinet. He used the highest quality paint and grain fillers, ending up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. All of the knobs are original, and Blake installed a new, period-correct grille cloth. 16"W x 13"H x 12"D. Was $799.00, now $699.00. (1600350)

 

Stewart Warner R-1261 "York" (1934)

Stewart Warner R-1261 "York" (1934)

There are two kinds of nicknames for radios. A nickname that came from the designer, and those that came from collectors. There are several Stewart Warner models that have "factory" nicknames, such as the R-1281. But a "collector" nickname example is the Zenith Walton, named long after the radio was manufactured. The "York" is a seven-tube, four-band (AM,SWx3) radio. This set was top-of-the-line for Stewart-Warner in 1934 and a great performer utilizing an 8-inch speaker and an early "robot" dial. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord, antenna lead and audio input were installed. Gary restored the original finish. Gary is one of the best in the business, and this radio exemplifies his talent! The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the set. A reproduction grille cloth was added. In addition, this radio receives Shortwave quite well. This model is fairly scarce, and you won't find a better example anywhere! 19"H x 14"W x 11"D. $1,195.00. (1600519)

 

Stewart-Warner R-1271 "The Bond" (1934)

Stewart-Warner R-1271 "The Bond" (1934)

Here is another gorgeous Stewart-Warner radio. The first one for sale on the Radio Attic, the very rare "Bond" model. This seldom seen radio is yet another factory named set, going along with several other "named" models. The R-1271 is a five-tube, three band (AM,SWx3) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a safety fuse and an audio input cable for your external device. The radio has its original cloth power cord. The radio is a strong performer with lots of volume. Gary meticulously restored the Maple, Walnut and Quilted Maple cabinet to a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The reproduction grille cloth closely matches the original pattern. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are present. Folks, these radios just don't show up at all, and here's a beautifully restored one for your collection! 17-1/2"H x 13-1/2"W x 8-1/4"D. $1,195.00. (1600475)

 

Stewart-Warner R-1272 "Prado" (1934)

Stewart-Warner R-1272 "Prado" (1934)

Stewart-Warner started incorporating multiple types of veneers and ornate grilles on their mid-size tombstones a year or two before some of the other manufacturers. They already had a great reputation of producing quality electronics, so this was another feather in their cap! This five-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) set was a solid performer, producing great fidelity and volume through its original 8-inch speaker. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. Tested resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. We wired in a new SB antenna. This radio actually has a separate antenna for shortwave as well. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio cable were installed, and he aligned the radio for top performance. This radio has a gorgeous cabinet, and Gary has made it shine. He stripped the veneer, Birdseye maple, Australian laurel, walnut and regular maple. He applied grain filler and toner, finishing with several coats of lacquer. This radio has a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs and a new period correct grille cloth were used. This is one beautiful radio, one that any collector would love! 17-1/2"H x 14"W x 9-1/2"D. $795.00. (1600414)

 

Stewart-Warner R-1802 "Cube" (1938)

Stewart-Warner R-1802 "Cube" (1938)

Stewart-Warner started producing radios in 1925. They had already established themselves, manufacturing high-quality automobile gauges, and their radios were also of a high quality. They hired the best designers and engineers right out of college, and their products reflected that quality and precision. The R-1802 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,Police) radio. I attribute Zenith for producing the first "Cube" design radios. They were great sellers, so most manufacturers followed suit and came out with a "Cube" design. Stewart-Warner was no exception, and they manufactured a few models of their own. All of the capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio input cable were installed. Gary stripped the cabinet and did a fantastic job refinishing the unique Walnut cabinet. The original knobs, speaker and chassis along with a perfect dial scale are with the radio. The cabinet features a pedestal base and presents nicely with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. This is simply a gorgeous, great performing radio. It's ready to grace someone's collection! 16-1/2"W x 11-1/2"H x 9-1/2"D. $596.00. (1600531)

 

Stromberg-Carlson 230H (1937)

Stromberg-Carlson 230H (1937)

Stromberg-Carlson of Rochester, New York, is probably known more for their design and manufacturing of telephones, but they also made very high-quality radios. Hiring the brightest engineers right out of college, their radios were brilliantly designed and flawlessly manufactured, right down to the cabinet designs. The 230-H is a gorgeous example of that. The 230-H is a seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a safety fuse, power cord, audio input cable and a new antenna lead. The radio has plenty of volume through an 8-inch speaker, and good sensitivity across the dial. The tuning eye is bright and active. Gary stripped the cabinet of its old finish, and with his usual mastery ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, speaker and chassis. A reproduction grille cloth was installed. The 230-H is a large, rare radio and I doubt you can find one restored to this high quality. 24"W x 13-1/2"H x 10"D. $1,495.00. (1600534)

 

Willard Radio (model unknown, 1932)

Willard Radio (model unknown, 1932)

Finding any information about the Willard Radio Company has been very difficult. An article in my 2016 SCARS Gazette about the first "Peter Pan" radio, gave me the information that I was looking for. The first Peter Pan radios were made by the Flint Radio Company in the spring of 1931 at the Gilfillan plant in Los Angeles. They were called "Pee-Wee" radios because of their size. When Flint merged with Jackson-Bell in June of 1931, the Peter Pan image (model 84) replaced the floral grill of the Flint Peter Pan. Jackson-Bell continued using TRF electronics from Flint until switching to Superheterodyne process in the early 1930's. It is suggested that the name Willard came from Willard Bell, the brother of Herb Bell, the founder and owner of Jackson Bell. Jackson Bell and Willard Radio Company stayed in business until the end of 1932. Willard radios were only sold in the Pacific Northwest. This Willard is a four-tube, AM-only TRF radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. The original plug was used on a new period-correct power cord. A safety fuse and audio input cable were added. Gary stripped off the old finish and ended up with a gorgeous refinish! The knobs, Lansing speaker and chassis are original. Here is yet another radio that no one probably has, and it's priced right for anyone's collection! 11"H x 9-1/2"W x 8-1/2"D. $399.00. (1600538)

 

Zenith 5-J-217 "Cube" (1938)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Zenith 5-J-217 "Cube" (1938)

These highly collectable Zenith radios, referred to as a "Cube," were a huge success for Zenith. This iconic, good sounding, reliable radio created a huge following and are still desirable radios to this day, and this model is very rare amongst "Cubes." Zenith made several models of the "Cube" and this is the only AC/6 volt version I have ever seen. The 5-J-217 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW) AC and six volt battery radio. All of the capacitors were replaced with new Mylar equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A safety fuse, antenna lead, power cord and audio input cable were installed. Gary stripped the original finish off of the Mahogany and walnut cabinet. He ended up with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. The radio has the original knobs, speaker and chassis. This rare model is very unique, and we offer the necessary cables should you want to use it in six volt capacity. We also have designed our own six volt power supply, so you can use this radio both ways at home. 14"W x 11"H x 10"D. Was $899.00, now $799.00. (1600509)

 

Zenith 5-S-228 (1938)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Zenith 5-S-228 (1938)

The 5-S-228 came out in June of 1937 for the 1938 line. Some of the printed advertising showed the 228 along with a few "cube" models. The 228 was basically a mini-tombstone version of the "cube," utilizing the five-tube 5521 chassis which was used in a few cube models. Popular with collectors as it is a little harder to find this model due to lower production numbers. The 5-S-228 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. All of the capacitors were replaced with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse, audio input jack and antenna lead were installed. Gary stripped the cabinet and skillfully restored it to a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the radio. We installed a reproduction grille cloth. This radio performs well and has good sensitivity, picking up many stations across the dial. This is a very nice 5-S-228 and would be a great addition to anyone's collection! 13"H x 10"W x 9-1/2"D. Was $749.00, now $699.00. (1600469)

 

Zenith 6-D-2620 "Boomerang" (1942)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Zenith 6-D-2620 "Boomerang" (1942)

Like all manufacturers, Zenith was scrambling a bit to produce products right before the war. Bakelite was not readily available, so the designers came up with wooden designs to use up an inventory of existing chassis. Zenith engineer Kurt Emde, who designed the "Robot Dial," came up with the "Dial-Speaker" design, which Zenith patented. This chassis was used in seven "Boomerang" models. The D-2620 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW), AC/DC radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord and a safety fuse. The radio employs a "Wave Magnet" internal loop antenna and has good reception across the dial on both bands. Gary stripped the cabinet of straight-grained Walnut. He finished the radio with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. A new Mark Palmquist crystal-clear dial cover was installed. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and speaker. This is a perfect example of a 6-D-2620 that would grace any collection! 14"W x 9"H x 7"D. Was $599.00, now $549.00. (1600525)

 

Zenith 6-S-27 (1936)

Zenith 6-S-27 (1936)

During the summer of 1935, Zenith came out with a new tombstone design. The most obvious change was the size; these radios were two feet tall and commanded attention with room-shaking volume. Zenith added a smaller version of their big, black multicolored dial, and the radio also had the new design features of the console radios. The 6-S-27 is a six-tube, three-band (SB+SWx2) set. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio input cable were added. This radio has excellent sensitivity across the dial and tons of volume. Gary stripped the unique cabinet that has Maple and Walnut veneers and is trimmed with Australian Laurel. The inset grille design is a smaller version of the grille on the 12-A-58 console. After painting and grain filling, Gary finished the radio with a few coats of lacquer, and hand-polished to a gorgeous luster. The set has the original wood "Z" knobs, chassis, speaker, and a reproduction grille cloth was installed. We have had a few of these over the years, but they usually are sold before we can post them on the Attic. Not this time, however! 23-1/2"H x 17"W x 14"D. $995.00. (1600539)

 

Zenith 6-S-128 (1937)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Zenith 6-S-128 (1937)

The Zenith tombstone radios from from 1936 and 1937 set a very high bar on tombstone design and innovative electronic features. Standing close to two feet tall and a foot and a half wide, they are the dominant feature in any room they are displayed in. Zenith tombstones and table radios had a lot of the same features as their high-end consoles. This six-tube, three-band (SB, SW, police) radio with its original 8-inch Zenith speaker is a high performing, quality radio in its own right. We went through the chassis replacing all of the capacitors, checking and replacing resistors and tubes where needed. A safety fuse, external audio cable, antenna lead and a new polarized power cord. Gary stripped the cabinet and did a total restoration using the proper toners and lacquers. The radio has a factory "piano" finish and it's a stunning beauty! We added a period-correct Zenith reproduction grille cloth, and retained the original wooden knobs. These radios are getting scarce as people are buying them and putting them in collections. If you have been looking for a nice, restored Zenith tombstone, then look no farther! 22"H x 16-1/2"W x 12"D. Was $995.00, now $895.00. (1600450)

 

Zenith 7G605 Trans-Oceanic "Bomber" (1942)

Zenith 7G605 Trans-Oceanic "Bomber" (1942)

Trans-Oceanic radios were conceived in 1941 by Commander Eugene F. McDonald, president of Zenith. He wanted a portable radio he could use on his boat for entertainment, news, weather, marine shortwave as well as international stations. The Trans-Oceanic was a hit, and Zenith produced them from 1941 to 1981. Zenith began the Clipper Trans-Oceanic production in October 1941 with Sailboat graphics. In January of 1942 after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Zenith changed the grille cloth to the Bomber graphics. By April of 1942 the US Government halted all domestic radio production, and all manufacturing was for the war effort. The 7G605 is a seven-tube, six-band (SB,SWx5) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. Gary noted the snakeskin cabinet was in good condition, and it cleaned up nicely. The handle is in good condition. The knobs are original and the two antennas are present and function well. The Trans-Oceanics were well made and are very sensitive across all bands. The "Bomber" is considered to be the "Holy Grail" of Trans-Oceanic radios, this particular "Bomber" is a gem! 17"W x 10"H x 7"D. $1,195.00. (1600529)

 

Zenith 7-S-232 "Walton" (1938)

Zenith 7-S-232 "Walton" (1938)

"The Waltons" television series used this model 7-S-232 as a prop for the family gatherings in the evenings. That gave this radio its nickname "the Walton" and really is one of the most collectible radios in the world! This seven-tube, three-band (SB, SWx2) operates like new. We replaced all of the wax/paper capacitors with new Mylar caps of equal values. The resisters and tubes were checked and replaced as needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, antenna lead and audio input cable have been added. The radio was aligned for optimum performance. The dial scale is in excellent condition. The radio has a mix of Maple, American Walnut and butt-matched Walnut veneers. There were no repairs needed on this cabinet, so it retains all of its original patina. Gary Marvin has professionally refinished the cabinet with the finest products, ending up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, speaker and chassis are original to this set. The grille cloth is an accurate reproduction of the original. There were no shortcuts taken as the base and back are refinished and the inside is repainted "Zenith Blue." Waltons are getting very hard to find right now, so don't miss this opportunity to own a beautifully restored Zenith radio! 23"H x 17"W x 13"D. $2,795.00. (1600540)

 

Zenith 7-S-323 (1939)

Zenith 7-S-323 (1939)

In 1939, Zenith offered a few models of very large table radios. The cabinet had the depth of a console radio, and some of the chassis were also used in console models. In 1939, they offered a seven-tube and a nine-tube version. In 1940, they offered an eight-tube version, and a twelve-tube set. There are a few other models of this very large, highly collectable radio. The 7-S-323 is seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. I've always felt that the seven-tube Zeniths were some of the best receivers out there during this time period, and this one is no exception. This radio was picking up some shortwave stations in the shop during the day, which generally doesn't happen. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where necessary. A new safety fuse, power cord, antenna lead and audio input cable were installed. Gary definitely "Marvinized" this cabinet, which was in great condition to start with. The stripping of the old finish and pristine lacquer finish are highlights of his work. The original knobs, chassis and 8-inch speaker are with the set. Gary installed a period-correct grille cloth. There just aren't many of these big Zeniths around as they just didn't make many. Here's a fine example of the seven-tube version completely restored and "collection ready!" 24"W x 14"H x 13"D. $1,195.00. (1600536)

 

Zenith 705 (1934)

ON SALE
until
August 16

Zenith 705 (1934)

In 1933, FDR had been elected president as the country was experiencing a severe depression. Unlike most companies, Zenith had a huge surplus of cash, and produced 125 models, the 200, 400, 500 and 600 model series for 1933, up from just 25 the year before. Several models were carried over to 1934, and the 700 series radios, called the "Challenger" series came out. The 705 is a six-tube, AM only, AC powered radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. We then checked the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and a new antenna lead. The radio has good sensitivity across the dial and plays with good tone and plenty of volume. Gary stripped the burl walnut and mahogany cabinet. He ended up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, dial scale, speaker and chassis. A beautiful "mantle" radio (Zenith didn't make many) to grace your collection. 15-1/2"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. Was $499.00, now $449.00. (1600396)

 

Zenith 715 (1933)

Zenith 715 (1933)

As the 1930's progressed, radio cabinet design went away from the Gothic cathedral style to the tombstone. Early tombstones would have touches of cathedral design. With a rounded arch at the top and ornate grilles along with the straight, majestic "skyscraper" influence, this radio has it all, top of the line for Zenith in 1935. The 715 is an eight-tube, standard broadcast only radio. The receiver is one of the best made in 1933. Standing 20 inches tall with an 8-inch speaker, this radio is impressive in stature and performance with volume to spare. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, audio input cable, antenna lead and safety fuse were installed. The tuning meter is very active. Gary knocked it out of the park with a stellar refinish. The butt Walnut front accentuated with the maple top strip and inlay along the pilasters is gorgeous. The original chassis, knobs, dial scale and speaker are with the set. This rare, perfect Zenith can be yours! They ain't makin' 'em anymore folks! 20"H x 16"W x 9-1/2"D. $1,195.00. (1600526)

 

Zenith 908 (1935)

Zenith 908 (1935)

The Zenith 908 is a very rare radio. Manufactured late in 1934 for the 1935 model year, it didn't even make an appearance till February of 1935. Slow sales doomed it for a very short run, and Zenith halted production shortly after its debut. So, finding this sought after radio in restored condition doesn't happen very often. The 908 is a six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio. The 1935 radios were great playing sets. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes have been checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, audio input cable and a safety fuse. It has excellent sensitivity across the dial with plenty of volume through the 8-inch speaker. Gary meticulously refinished the walnut cabinet with gorgeous Burl Walnut veneer on the front. He applied several coats of lacquer and hand-polished to a "piano" finish. The radio has the correct knobs (without the "Z"), the original chassis, dial scale and speaker. Gary installed a new, reproduction grille cloth. If you would like a rare Zenith for your collection that no one else has, then this is your radio! 18"H x 14-1/2"W x 9-1/2"D. $1,495.00. (1600514)
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About Joe's Radio Shop

Shipping

Joe's Radio Shop started selling radios on The Radio Attic in 2017. From our first posting of six restored radios, we have been featured as a Premier Seller, having now sold over 500 radios! We completely disassemble each radio. The cabinet is stripped of its old finish and refinished using the best products. Gary Marvin has been refinishing radios for more than 30 years. His knowledge of how they were done at the factory and his techniques of years of refinishing are unsurpassed. We have a team of four electronic experts, a couple of them with engineering degrees. They have been building and repairing radios since they were kids. We do everything in-house, producing some of the finest restored radios in the country. Our shipping process is equally refined. Having sold and shipped over 500 radios, we have discovered that isolating the radio in the box using materials that will absorb the shocks and bangs of shipping pretty much insures a safe arrival. We ship with UPS as we get a preferred rate, but arrangements can be made with other carriers. We are known for standing behind our products, and go the whole nine yards to insure you have properly functioning radio. If there is an issue that can't be resolved over the phone, we will repair the radio at no cost to you, either by finding a qualified repair expert in your area, or having you ship the radio back to us for repairs. You cover the cost to ship to us, we pay the return shipping. Our product speaks for itself, as well as a few customer comments.

Payment

Joe's Radio Shop accepts payment through PayPal, credit cards (we use the Square, which requires a 3.75% fee) and checks.  Payment plus shipping must be deposited before we ship your radio to you.  Checks must clear our bank before shipping.  Joe's Radio Shop will not provide or sell your personal information to anyone.  Credit card information is shredded and discarded after the charge is made and deposited.  Upon ordering, you will receive an invoice via email with cost plus shipping charges.  A receipt will arrive with the radio.

Don't like the price? Give us an offer!

Joe's Radio Shop return policy:

We accept returns, but we would first try to resolve any issues and make sure your radio is functioning as it should.  A few guidelines for vintage tube radios to function properly:
1. Most radios need an antenna to function properly.  10-20 feet of wire connected to the "A" lug in the back of the chassis, which we will provide to you.  Some radios have internal antennas, or "loops."  For the most part, these radios should receive broadcast or "AM" stations in your area.
2. Multiple band radios that have 1-3 short wave bands will also need plenty of antenna.  There isn't much going on these day with short wave.  Many short wave stations have moved to satellite or the internet.  There are a few out there, and a good antenna is needed.  Ask us about antennas; we can describe how to make them to use at your home.  Try to place your radio on an outside wall, the reception will be better, especially with console radios.  Police and aviation (now UHF) bands no longer function in today's world.
3. There are things in a household that can cause static and interference.  Computers, fluorescent lighting, lighting potentiometers (dimmer switch), microwave ovens, digital TV and possibly your wi-fi system.  Try to keep the radio out of proximity to these devices.
4. Running the radio for long periods of time can can them to overheat causing damage.

Please contact us within seven days for a possible return.  E-mail us at joesradioshop1@gmail.com or phone us at 503-209-8414.  Our radios come with a six  month guarantee from the purchase date.  Any electrical damage or failure will be repaired free of cost minus materials and shipping.  If there is damage from shipping, the claim has to go through the shipper.  If we determine the damage is the shipper or buyers fault, we can negotiate a repair price.  If an issue can't be resolved to the buyer's liking, we will offer a full refund minus shipping and insurance.  If the buyer pays the shipper directly, the buyer assumes all responsibility for insurance settlements due to damage while in transit.  When shipping a radio back to us, please follow our packing guidelines listed under Shipping.  If the radio is improperly packed, the refund will be denied.


Customer Comments

"Radio and speaker arrived in excellent condition. tremendous job packing. A pleasure indeed to do business with you both" ...DB in WY

"Joe. got the Philco 20 all safe and sound. Gorgeous radio, thanks again." ...DC in PA

"I'm happy to tell you that the radio arrived today and it's in excellent condition! Thank you very much for all your efforts and the careful packing." ...MT in Germany

"Many thanks for the beautiful Zenith radio which arrived safely. The Bluetooth works well and I am delighted with my purchase!" ...GN in NM

"Radio arrived safe and sound before Christmas. Thank You." ...VW in BC Canada

"I am very pleased with the 6-S-27 and must compliment the finish. He really does a nice job!" ...JL in PA

"Mr. Millward, I have no problems with with my radio. Your radio is beautiful." ...ES in OK

"I just wanted to let you know that the radio arrived in excellent condition and it is playing great. Thank you for a very nice radio, I am very happy with it." ...JM in IL

"The Majestic 15 arrived today. I installed the chassis and it works like a champ. Thank you for your diligence and fine work." ...,JW in CA

"Just wanted to let you know the Atwater-Kent cathedral arrived safely today. Thanks for the VERY careful packing job and the radio is just beautiful." ...GO in NY


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