Joe Millward's Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2017"

the Radio Attic


 

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Air Castle 14-136EA (1938)

Air Castle 14-136EA (1938)

Air Castle radios were sold by the Chicago-based Spiegel Inc. mail order company. By 1906, sales reached one million dollars (30 million today). Radio sales started around 1933 continuing for many years, with most models manufactured by Detrola. The 14-136EA is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) receiver. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, antenna lead and audio cable were installed. The radio is a good performer with plenty of volume and sensitivity. Gary did a great job on the cabinet, stripping off the old finish and ending up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer luster! The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the set. The original glass dial is present. This radio is a beautiful Air Castle example, affordable and ready for your collection! 18"W x 10"H x 6-1/2"D. $549.00. (1600427)

 

Atwater Kent 725 (1936)

Atwater Kent 725 (1936)

Atwater Kent started producing high-quality radios in Philadelphia in 1922. Between 1923 and 1927, they produced 1.3 million radios, making them the leading radio manufacturer in America. Due to problems with the unions and the depression, he closed the factory in 1936. Model 725 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set. The 725 has separate lights for each band, and the dial pointer is illuminated when the radio is turned on. All of the capacitors were replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse and external audio cable were installed. The cabinet was stripped and refinished with a nice satin finish. The original knobs and grille cloth are with the set. The speaker was re-coned and a new dial cover from Mark Palmquist was installed. This is a really nice sounding Atwater Kent, and will definitely grace anyone's collection! 17"H x 13"W x 8"D. $499.00. (1600371)

 

Belmont 740 (1937)

Belmont 740 (1937)

Belmont Radio Corporation based in Chicago, started building radios early on. Advertising stated "Manufacturers of High Grade Radio Receiving Sets Since 1925." In the 1930's, they built wood cathedral styles, wood table sets and consoles, but they are best known for their curvy, streamlined Bakelite designs. The 740 is a seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) AC radio. It utilizes two 6F6 tubes for push-pull audio, producing a lot of volume. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, power cord and an audio input were added. Gary did a fantastic refinish, ending up with a hard, "piano" lacquer finish. The original wood knobs are with the set. Belmont made radios for other companies, and this particular model looks a lot like some Airline models I've seen. This is the first one for sale on the Radio Attic, and it's ready for your collection. Come and get it! It won't last long! 20"W x 11-1/2"H x 9"D. $749.00. (1600408)

 

Crosley 615 "Cruiser" (1936)

Crosley 615 "Cruiser" (1936)

The Crosley Radio Corporation was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1921 by Powell Crosby. He produced radios at a high volume, and copied the "assembly line" concept, earning him the moniker "The Henry Ford of Radio." He later manufactured appliances, cars and contributed the "proximity fuse" during the war. The 615 is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, antenna lead and a new power cord were installed. A full alignment was performed, making this radio a strong performer across the dial. Gary stripped and refinished the gorgeous Walnut cabinet, ending up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The chassis, speaker and knobs are original, and a new crystal-clear dial cover was added. This radio would be a wonderful addition to any collection and can be yours in a matter of days! 16"H x 12"W x 9"D. $749.00. (1600403)

 

Emerson 45 (1935)

Emerson 45 (1935)

Emerson started up in 1915 manufacturing phonographs and producing records in New York City. They started selling radios in 1924, with their first big seller being the "Peewee" in 1932. After the war, they branched out, selling home appliances and later, televisions. The Emerson Corporation is still in business today. The model 45 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. The original phono input can be adapted for an external device upon request. The Ingraham cabinet is in great condition and was refinished to a semi-gloss finish. The knobs, chassis and speaker are original to the set. A period-correct reproduction grille cloth was added as well as a new cloth power cord and safety fuse. These early Emerson tombstones are seldom seen, especially in this condition. This one is ready for that special Emerson collector, or for your collection at home. 16"H x 12"W x 9"D. $629.00. (1600375)

 

Emerson AR-171 (1938)

Emerson AR-171 (1938)

As most collectors know, Emerson had an almost exclusive deal with the Ingraham Clock Company to design and manufacture 90% of their wood cabinets. Known for their curvy and angular designs, plus the use of fine veneers, Ingraham cabinets are recognized as some of the finest. They are still highly coveted by collectors today. The AR-171 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. It's rare to find a six-tube radio with push-pull audio as well. We replaced all of the capacitors with new Mylar caps. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, plenty of antenna wire and an audio input. With that push-pull audio, this radio is a strong performer. Gary stripped off the old finish, and masterfully restored the radio to a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has an Ingraham trademark Maple inlay encircling the Walnut cabinet. The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the radio. This particular model isn't seen much, and is unique in its own right. It can be proudly displayed in any collection, especially the Ingraham collector looking for that seldom seen model. 16-1/2"W x 11"H x 8-1/2"D. $649.00. (1600410)

 

Emerson CS-320 (1939)

Emerson CS-320 (1939)

As I have mentioned in previous ads, Emerson had an arrangement with Ingraham Clock Company to do most of their radio cabinets. Although Ingraham did do cabinets for other manufacturers, their biggest customer by far was Emerson. Ingraham cabinets are easy to recognize because of their curvy and angular Art Deco designs. The CS-320 is no exception. The radio is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) AC/DC set. All of the capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and antenna lead were installed. This is a rare set as it has a short wave band too. Most of the Emerson table radios were AM only. Gary did a fantastic job refinishing the Walnut cabinet. There is a nice inlay of Maple on the set, and two unique brass balls on the front corners. The original Ingraham badging, knobs, chassis and speaker are with the radio. For the Emerson collector looking for that rare model, or just a beautiful set to grace your collection, this radio is ready to go! 13"W x 9"H x 7"D. $649.00. (1600413)

 

Emerson L-141 "Cube" (1937)

Emerson L-141 "Cube" (1937)

The Emerson Phonograph Company was formed in New York City in 1918. They started making radios in 1924, and produced the first phonograph/radio combination. By WWII, it held one sixth of the U.S. radio market. With the advent of television, their sales more than doubled by 1950. Emerson is still in business today. The L-141 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW-disabled) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with Mylar equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new antenna lead, audio input cable and a new power cord were installed. The Ingraham cabinet has Burl Walnut and Walnut veneers with maple and ebony inlays. Gary stripped the cabinet, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original chassis, speaker and knobs are with the set. A crystal-clear dial cover from Mark Palmquist was added. This unique "cube" design was a rare radio for Emerson, but they wanted to get in on the popularity and sales of the cubes. This is one beautiful radio for any collection, and a wonderful addition to Emerson collections. 14"H x 11"W x 8"D. $895.00. (1600404)

 

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson started producing phonographs in 1915 in New York City, and is still producing products today. Emerson has made phonographs, radios, televisions, air conditioners, and later on it made refrigerators, computers, defibrillators, CD players and VCRs. The R-158 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,police) set. It was offered with a TV band at one time as well. Blake started the chassis restore by replacing all of the capacitors. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio cable were installed. The radio has very good sensitivity across the dial, and performs with nice tone and plenty of volume. Gary refinished the rosewood and walnut cabinet with the best products. This is an Ingraham cabinet and the Ingraham badge is present. The unique cabinet is accented with two brass strips that cross over the top and down the front of the set. The radio has the original dial with a new clear dial cover, knobs, grille cloth and speaker. Gary finished with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. A really nice looking and performing set for your collection. 15"W x 9-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. $449.00. (1600272)

 

Firestone 3-7403-7 "The Strafford" (1941)

Firestone 3-7403-7 "The Strafford" (1941)

I really like Firestone "Air Chief" table radios, and I have several in my collection. It features a beautiful and unique Ingraham cabinet, and is one of the more popular models with collectors. This six-tube, two-band (SB, SW) radio, was the first one I collected. I went through this radio and replaced all of the capacitors, checked and replaced resistors and tubes, installed a new power cord, dial cover and added an audio input. The radio was aligned and performs strong across the dial, utilizing an internal loop antenna. Steve stripped the cabinet and did some really nice highlighting of the stripe around the cabinet. The final result was a gorgeous piano finish. The radio has the original knobs and back. This beautifully designed radio is ready to add to anyone's collection. 14"W x 8"H x 8"D. $699.00. (1600409)

 

Grunow 550 "Chromefront" (1934)

Grunow 550 "Chromefront" (1934)

Starting in 1928 in Chicago, Grigsby-Grunow produced the famous and high performing Majestic brand radios. They hired the brightest engineering talent available and became one of the most prolific radio and tube manufacturing companies of the time. In spite of the depression in 1929, Majestic radios were very successful and were even distributed in Europe and Africa. By 1931, Mr. Grunow started General Household Utilities Co. and produced radios under the Grunow name. The 550 is a five-tube, AM only, AC/DC radio. The chassis was completely rebuilt using modern capacitors. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and antenna lead were installed. An external audio cable is not available for this AC/DC set. Most of the finish is original (restored) except that Gary did redo the top. The original knobs and speaker are with the radio. A reproduction of the original cloth was installed. The chrome is in perfect condition, and the radio performs perfectly! This seldom seen early Grunow is ready to grace your collection... make it yours! 12"W x 8"H x 5-1/2"D. $699.00. (1600389)

 

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson Bell started radio production in Los Angeles, CA in 1926. Herb Bell began the business with his brother Elmer. Gilfillan made the chassis and Elmer made the cabinets. At one time or another, the whole family was involved in the business, including their father Anton. In 1929, Herb became partners with Mr. Jackson, and the company ceased operations in 1933. The model 62 is a six-tube, AM only radio. The radio had been restored by the previous owner, and Blake checked it out making sure it met our standards. A period-correct cloth power cord was installed. An audio cable is not available for this radio. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet. He finished the radio with a satin finish. The radio is gorgeous and has the original knobs and grille cloth. Also present is the often-missing "velvet tone" label located on the lower front of the radio. I think this tag is found only on the Fleur-de-Lis model. Other designs are the Swan, Tulip, Sunburst, Peacock, and the iconic Peter pan. If you are looking for a Fleur-de-Lis for your collection, it would be difficult to find one better than this one. 15"H x 13"W x 8-1/2"D. $599.00. (1600303)

 

Jackson-Bell 99 (1932)

Jackson-Bell 99 (1932)

This Jackson-Bell has never made an appearance on the Radio Attic. In fact, I found only one picture of a model 99 online, but I believe my cabinet is totally unique. There are a couple of models that have decorative pilasters on the front of the cabinet, but they are much smaller than this radio. The 99 is rare enough by itself, but this cabinet's pilasters are totally different! The model 99 is a nine-tube, AM only receiver and It features push-pull audio output. I have never seen a nine-tube chassis in a Gilfillan table radio, who produced all of Jackson-Bell's electronics. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. We added a safety fuse and a switchable audio input cable. Steve did a great job restoring the finish, and he made a perfect veneer repair on top. The original knobs and speaker are with the radio and we installed a period-correct grille cloth. I believe this Jackson Bell is a "one-off" and there ain't another one like it! 17"H x 15"W x 9"D. $1,295.00. (1600429)

 

Majestic 161 (1933)

Majestic 161 (1933)

Grigsby-Grunow Company started manufacturing radios in 1928 in Chicago. In 1933, they introduced the "Smart Sets." The Majestic 161 was not in any of the advertising for the "Smart Sets." The only mention of the 161 was later in an ad for Gambles, who had bought the remaining inventory after the bankruptcy. We guess that it was available at the end of 1933, thus making it it possibly the last "Smart Set" model manufactured. The radio cabinets were designed by the Chicago company Rosenow, who also designed the 800 series Zenith chrome front radios. The Majestic 161 is a six-tube, AM only receiver. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. We checked all of the resistors and tubes and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, audio cable and antenna lead were installed. Gary did a fantastic job stripping and refinishing this rare radio, and the "piano" lacquer finish is gorgeous!. Two of the knobs were missing, and Mark Palmquist made a perfect pair for me. The chrome grille was replated and is perfect. You seldom see this model, and never in this pristine condition. Here's a chance to own one of the rarest Majestic chrome front radios! 18"H x 14"W x 9"D. $1,995.00. (1600428)

 

Midwest 11-36 (1936)

NEW!

Midwest 11-36 (1936)

In 1920, Midwest Radio Corporation (Miraco) started making battery radios. In 1932 they produced an eleven-tube set, and in 1933, a sixteen-tube set, all available through mail order. They offered unique Art Deco cabinets, but you could purchase the chassis without a cabinet, a great money-saver. The 11-36 is an eleven-tube, four-band (AM, SWx3) radio. This chassis was used in several console models, making this table set very rare. In fact, it's the only one we've seen! We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tube were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, audio input and antenna lead were installed. Gary stripped the cabinet and ended up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The original chassis, speaker, knobs and grille cloth are with the set. The chrome escutcheon is in excellent condition. This radio is a great performer with console-like bass response with push-pull audio output. There isn't one like it in existence to our knowledge. The Midwest Museum has the export version, but not this domestic version. Whoever gets it is buying a very rare, high-performance radio! 24-1/2"W x 14-1/2"H x 11"D. $1,995.00. (1600431)

 

Norco 160 (1935)

Norco 160 (1935)

Norco (Northwestern Radio Manufacturing Company) was founded in 1921 in Portland, Oregon by Charles Austin. He initially produced early TRF radios, but is famous for creating Oregon's first broadcast radio station (7XF). Later in 1930, he created Oregon's first short wave Police Radio station. He was also selling super-het radios made by Remler and Mission Bell with the Norco name on them. The Norco 160 is five-tube, three-band (AM,SW,Police) radio. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors have been checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord and external audio cable were installed. The walnut cabinet was completely stripped, grain-filled and painted. The set was finished with a hard lacquer "piano" finish, then hand-polished. The radio has the original badging, knobs, speaker, chassis, and a reproduction grille cloth. This is only the second Norco radio offered on the Radio Attic. I know we all use the word "rare" frequently, but in this case it truly applies! 17"H x 16"W x 10"D. $549.00. (1600367)

 

Pilot 183 (1935)

Pilot 183 (1935)

Pilot Electric Manufacturing Company was founded in Brooklyn NY, by Isidor Goldberg in 1922. The company had several businesses, located in New York, Long Island and Massachusetts. They made early TRF sets and tubes. Pilot radios were also manufactured in England and Italy for the European market prior to WWII. The Pilot 183 is a six-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. The capacitors were replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, auxiliary input and antenna lead were installed. The cabinet has Walnut, Maple, Australian Laurel and Zebrawood veneers. Gary refinished it to a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and speaker. A period-correct grille cloth was installed. Pilot radios of this quality are very hard to find, and are a great addition to any serious collection. Make this one yours today! 16"H x 13"W x 9"D. $795.00. (1600370)

 

RCA 9TX-3 "Little Nipper" (1939)

RCA 9TX-3 "Little Nipper" (1939)

Even with a stranglehold on the radio industry holding all the patents for superheterodyne technology, RCA themselves manufactured pretty good radios. Slowly some companies were able to pay RCA for the right to build super-hets, and eventually the patent ran out and opened the door for many small companies to do the same. The 9TX-3 is a five-tube, AM only, AC/DC radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where necessary. The radio is a good performer across the dial. Gary stripped the old finish off, and ended up with a beautiful "piano" finish on the Walnut cabinet. The original knobs are made of "Beetle" plastic, Catalin and Bakelite. This very unique RCA radio is ready for your collection and is priced right! 9"W x 5"H x 4"D. $595.00. (1600398)

 

RCA 16T4 (1940)

RCA 16T4 (1940)

Although general manager David Sarnoff made RCA one of the largest companies in the world, he ran the company with an iron fist. He held the patents for new radio technology and didn't share them. Many small companies couldn't afford to pay the royalties to utilize the technologies. Despite his business techniques, the company pioneered radio and television broadcasting for the world. Their products were top-notch. The 16T4 is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. With five-button electronic tuning, dual tone control for radio and phono input, and a new dual circuit loop antenna, this was one performing radio! We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A safety fuse and new power cord were installed. The radio has a factory phono input that works great with Bluetooth etc. A new addition to Joe's Radio Shop is Steve Tucker, who specializes in cabinet refinishing. Steve stripped the unique Walnut cabinet, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, six inch speaker and chassis are with the set. A unique RCA to add to you collection and is priced right! 19"W x 10"H x 8-1/2"D. $599.00. (1600405)

 

RCA 128 Tombstone (1935)

RCA 128 Tombstone (1935)

RCA designed and manufactured some great radios in the 1930's. Even though RCA had a stranglehold on the industry, controlling patents for TRF and Superheterodyne radios, a few companies were given permission to utilize the patents, most notably the Gilfillan Brothers in Los Angeles. A few other companies were allowed to use the patents, but they had to meet some strict standards and manufacture their radios in the Gilfillan factory. This six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) with its new "magic brain" circuitry, which was basically tuned RF with VCA, and a gorgeous cabinet design was a great seller for RCA. This radio has a ton of volume and a tone control with wonderful fidelity through an 8-inch speaker. We went in and replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked, replacing where necessary. A safety fuse was added along with an external audio cable and a new power cord. Gary did a complete restoration on the cabinet. The Walnut is gorgeous with a "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, speaker and grille cloth are original. This big beautiful radio can be in your collection in a matter of days! 20"H x 17"W x 11"D. $899.00. (1600393)

 

Sentinel 293W (1946)

Sentinel 293W (1946)

The Sentinel Radio Corp. was located in Evanston, Illinois, and manufactured radios, televisions and phonographs from 1930 to 1957. Some brands were Erla, Wings and Musicaire which were sold in Coast to Coast stores. This six-tube, AM only Bakelite radio has had all of the capacitors replaced, along with resistors and tubes checked and replaced as needed. The radio utilizes an internal loop antenna and receives the AM band with sensitivity and volume. The case has no cracks and has been polished. A really nice radio at a great price! 11-1/2"W x 7-1/2"H x 6"D. $139.00. (1600140)

 

Silvertone 4463 (4563 chassis) (1937)

Silvertone 4463 (4563 chassis) (1937)

This particular radio is a bit different. It utilizes a 4563 chassis as the original cabinet was beyond repair. We had this 4463 cabinet available, and the chassis is basically the same and was a perfect fit. The 4563 is a six-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new Mylar equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, audio input cable and antenna lead were installed. This radio plays with a lot of volume and great sensitivity across the dial. Gary stripped off the old finish, and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs and speaker are with the original 4563 chassis. A great price on a super nice Silvertone! 16-1/2"W x 10-1/2"H x 9"D. $499.00. (1600422)

 

Silvertone 4465 "Pyramid" (1937)

Silvertone 4465 "Pyramid" (1937)

For style and function, the 4465 is one of my favorite tombstone radios. The "Egyptian" motif cabinet and dial has an eye tube that looks like the sun, with projecting rays. Very unusual, and was used on several console and table radios in Silvertone's "Golden Jubilee" series. The cabinet had a broad base that gently tapers in towards the top, giving the radio its "Pyramid" nickname. The 4465 is an eight-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) and has the large, golden dial with the extended range (1850kcs) AM band. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. The "tuning eye" tube was replaced and is bright and active. A safety fuse, power cord, audio input and antenna lead were installed. Gary did his usual masterful work stripping and refinishing to a "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, speaker and chassis are original. A reproduction grille cloth was added. A great performing, beautiful and collectable radio. 21"H x 16"W x 11"D. $995.00. (1600430)

 

Silvertone 4665 (1937)

Silvertone 4665 (1937)

Sears offered the consumer a lot of products. From toothbrushes to entire homes. Most of their products were of a high quality, and the radios they sold were no exception. The cabinets and chassis were manufactured by some of the best radio and furniture manufacturers in America. The 4665 is an eight-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio, and was towards the top of the line in 1937. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, safety fuse, audio input and antenna lead. The radio, performs with lots of volume and tone with great sensitivity across the dial. This radio came from a long-time Seattle collector and has an older, but nice cabinet restoration. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are with the set, and a reproduction grille cloth was added. This beauty has a very similar "tapered" cabinet to the popular model 4465. Wide at the bottom tapering up and is a little narrower at the top. The model 4665 doesn't turn up often, and there has been only one on the Radio Attic. This one is very nice, a unique Silvertone for your collection, and priced right! 21"H x 15"W x 11"D. $699.00. (1600401)

 

Silver (unknown model, 1937)

Silver (unknown model, 1937)

Silver Manufacturing Company was located in Chicago IL. It was a branch of the Demming Company of Salem OH, which manufactured machinery and tools. There isn't any mention when radio production started, but the earliest listed model is 1936. Several models crossed over with Climax and Clinton models, with Clinton Manufacturing making the electronics. This particular Silver radio has no model number, although it has similar parts to the Silver 139 and a few other models. It is a seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) AC/DC radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord and antenna lead were installed. The radio has very good sensitivity and an active tuning eye tube. Gary stripped off the old finish and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, speaker, chassis and dial scale are with the set. A new reproduction grille cloth was added. This radio is the first one up for sale on the Radio Attic, or anywhere for that matter! You can safely say that you've got the only one! 17"W x 9"H x 7-1/2"D. $995.00. (1600426)

 

Stewart-Warner R-110AT Tombstone (1933)

Stewart-Warner R-110AT Tombstone (1933)

Stewart-Warner was founded in 1905 in Chicago, and by 1912 produced a speedometer that was used in the Ford Model T. As well as vehicle instruments, they manufactured radios and refrigerators among other products. Here is a radio you don't see very often. There were several different radios offered with the 110 series chassis. This one was designated R-110AT, the "T" stands for twin speakers. This ten-tube, three-band (SB, SWx2) radio had other features like a noise suppression circuit, AVC, and push-pull audio, all very innovative for 1933. Blake went through the chassis replacing all of the capacitors, checked all of the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. He added a new cord, safety fuse and a cable to use an external device. An alignment was done making this radio a strong performer across the dial. Gary stripped the Walnut and Mahogany cabinet. He used the highest quality paint and grain fillers, ending up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. All of the knobs are original, and Blake installed a new, period-correct grille cloth. 16"W x 13"H x 12"D. $895.00. (1600350)

 

Stewart-Warner R-1261 "York" (1934)

Stewart-Warner R-1261 "York" (1934)

There are two kinds of nicknames for radios. A nickname that came from the designer, and those that came from collectors. There are several Stewart Warner models that have "factory" nicknames, such as the R-1281. But a "collector" nickname example is the Zenith Walton, named long after the radio was manufactured. The "York" is a seven-tube, four-band (AM,SWx3) radio. This set was top-of-the-line for Stewart-Warner in 1934 and a great performer utilizing an 8-inch speaker and an early "robot" dial. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. All of the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse, new power cord, antenna lead and audio input were installed. Gary restored the original finish. Gary is one of the best in the business, and this radio exemplifies his talent! The original knobs, speaker and chassis are with the set. A reproduction grille cloth was added. This model is fairly scarce, and you won't find a better example anywhere! 19"H x 14"W x 11"D. $1,195.00. (1600425)

 

Stewart-Warner R-1272 "Prado" (1934)

Stewart-Warner R-1272 "Prado" (1934)

Stewart-Warner started incorporating multiple types of veneers and ornate grilles on their mid-size tombstones a year or two before some of the other manufacturers. They already had a great reputation of producing quality electronics, so this was another feather in their cap! This five-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) set was a solid performer, producing great fidelity and volume through its original 8-inch speaker. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. Tested resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. We wired in a new SB antenna. This radio actually has a separate antenna for shortwave as well. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio cable were installed, and he aligned the radio for top performance. This radio has a gorgeous cabinet, and Gary has made it shine. He stripped the veneer, Birdseye maple, Australian laurel, walnut and regular maple. He applied grain filler and toner, finishing with several coats of lacquer. This radio has a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs and a new period correct grille cloth were used. This is one beautiful radio, one that any collector would love! 17-1/2"H x 14"W x 9-1/2"D. $795.00. (1600414)

 

Stewart-Warner R-1881 (1938)

Stewart-Warner R-1881 (1938)

Stewart-Warner "entry" level radios had the same quality built into them as the more expensive sets, but sold for a lower cost. The 1881 has never been shown for sale on the Attic. It is a nice performer with a simple but nice "waterfall" cabinet design. The R-1881 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW) AC/DC radio that utilizes a ballast tube. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, safety fuse and antenna lead were installed. The radio has nice fidelity with a separate tone control. Gary did a great job refinishing the cabinet and ended up with a polished "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, chassis and speaker are all original, and a new crystal-clear dial cover was installed. This nice little radio is priced to sell...make it yours today! 14"W x 10"H x 8"D. $495.00. (1600416)

 

Stromberg-Carlson 130-H (1936)

Stromberg-Carlson 130-H (1936)

Stromberg-Carlson Co. based in Rochester New York, made high-quality radios, telephones, and after WWII, televisions. They also entered the broadcast industry, acquiring WHAM in Rochester around 1939. The station changed its call letters to WBZA and is still in operation today. The 130-H is a seven-tube, three-band (SB, SWx2) radio. With its iconic octagon dial and gorgeous veneers, it is a top-of-the line radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A safety fuse and a period-correct cloth power cord was added, along with an audio cable for external devices. We aligned the radio and it plays quite well across the dial. The original finish was in pretty good condition, so we spiffed it up a bit and applied a couple of coats of lacquer. The knobs, speaker and chassis are original, and and the original grille cloth is with the set. There hasn't been too many of them for sale on the Radio Attic, and they are a little harder to find than some of the other Stromberg-Carlson radios. 20"W x 11-1/25"H x 10"D. $699.00. (1600421)

 

Truetone D-723 "Truetone Tulip" (1937)

Truetone D-723 "Truetone Tulip" (1937)

Truetone radios were manufactured by Detrola and were sold in Western Auto Stores. Several Detrola models crossed over to Truetone, Silvertone and Aria brands, just to name a few. The most valuable model was the "Egyptian" which were Detrola radios with a model for Truetone and a model for Silvertone. The radios were basically the same with small cabinet and dial differences. The D-723 is a seven-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) set. The radio has Push-Pull output utilizing two 42 output tubes through an 8-inch speaker. We replaced all of the capacitors. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse, audio input and antenna lead were added. A precision alignment was performed, and the radio has a lot of volume and great sensitivity across the dial. Gary stripped off the old finish, then refinished the Walnut and Maple veneers, ending up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. Gary installed a crystal-clear dial cover and a period-correct grille cloth. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and Rola speaker. If you are looking for a "Tulip," It would be difficult to find a nicer version than this one! 20"W x 11"H x 9"D. $995.00. (1600400)

 

Western Air Patrol 38 (1936)

Western Air Patrol 38 (1936)

Western Air Patrol were sold on the west coast through Western Auto Supply stores. These radios were made at the Gilfillan factory in Los Angeles. For the east coast stores, they were marketed as Truetone and came out of the Gilfillan factory in Kansas City. The relationship between the two locations was very complicated and lengthy to go over here, simply two different makes of radios sold by the same company. Gilfillan made a lot of the chassis for them, but they also used other companies as well, all of them working out of the Gilfillan factories. The model 38 is a five-tube, three-band (AM,SWx2) radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. We checked the tubes and resistors and replaced where necessary. The original cloth cord was in good shape, so we left it with the radio. We added an audio cable for Bluetooth, iPad etc. The cabinet has an earlier restoration and has a really nice semi-gloss finish. This is the first model 38 sold at the Radio Attic, and the first one I have seen.This unique and good performing radio is solid and ready for your collection! 11-3/4"W x 15"H x 9"D. $549.00. (1600420)

 

Westinghouse WR-214 (1936)

NEW!

Westinghouse WR-214 (1936)

George Westinghouse started the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company of Pittsburgh PA. in 1886. He competed with Edison on AC power distribution with the help of employee Nikola Tesla. Westinghouse formed RCA, purchased GE, AT&T and Marconi. In 1919 they started producing radios, and in 1920 started broadcasting on KDKA. The WR-214 is a ten-tube, four-band (AM,SWx3) radio. The largest tombstone they made, it was top of the line in 1937. This radio is a great performer and has an unusual tuning eye location in the middle of the grille. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. the resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A hew power cord, safety fuse, audio input cable and antenna lead were installed. Gary stripped this gorgeous radio and ended up with a "piano" lacquer finish. The Walnut veneer with a contrasting vertical band of quilted Maple is stunning. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are present. A period correct grille cloth was added. This radio is very hard to find, and you're truly not going to find one anywhere in this condition! 24"H x 17-1/2"W x 11"D. $1,495.00. (1600432)

 

Zenith 5-S-29 (1936)

Zenith 5-S-29 (1936)

In 1936, the Rural Electrification Act of 1936 started to set up rural areas in America with electricity. Zenith dropped prices and started producing table radios with smaller versions of their popular black dials. Zenith sales jumped significantly, and more and more people were hired. The 5-S-29 is a five-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio. The smaller dial had the multi-color bands and "split-second" tuning. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked, and out-of-tolerance components were replaced. A new power cord, audio input and safety fuse were installed. This radio plays great. I still feel that Zenith made some of the world's best performing five-tube radios. Gary "Marvinized" the gorgeous Art Deco cabinet. A cool design feature was the metal bezel, which is just a smaller version of the console bezels. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are included, and a new period-correct grille cloth installed. Once again, if you are looking for this radio for your collection, it doesn't get any better than this! 18"H x 13"W x 9"D. $749.00. (1600417)

 

Zenith 5-S-319 "Racetrack" (1939)

Zenith 5-S-319 "Racetrack" (1939)

I've written about Zenith changing over from large tombstone and "Walton" type radios to a different look and approach at the end of the 1930's into the 1940's. The 5-S-319 for the 1939 model year resembled their "cube" design, but certainly looked like a small version of the 1940 style table radio. The curved side-speaker grille and a more "rounded" design was a sign of things to come. The oval iconic "Racetrack" dial bezel is still very collectable. The 5-S-319 is a five-tube, two-band (AM,SW) radio. All of the capacitors were replaced with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, audio cable and antenna lead were installed. The radio plays great, and the audio cable works quite well. Steve stripped, grain-filled, and painted the radio and finished with a "piano" lacquer finish. The radio was missing the iconic Zebrawood decal, so Steve replaced it with a strip of real Zebrawood veneer! The radio has the original knobs, push buttons, speaker, chassis and a reproduction Zenith grille cloth. Here is a perfect example of the desirable "Racetrack" Zenith radio! 13"W x 9"H x 7-1/2"D. $799.00. (1600407)

 

Zenith 6-D-628 (1942)

Zenith 6-D-628 (1942)

The 6-D-628 was manufactured in 1942 and was one of the last radios Zenith produced before the war. The "D" designation identified the set as AC/DC set operating at 110 volts. The AC/DC sets had no transformer, but the rectifier tube acted as a transformer with DC output and tapped for the dial lamps. This radio was the big brother of the 6-D-525, known in 1941 as the very popular "Toaster" model. The 6-D-628 is a six-tube, AM only set. It produces a lot of volume and picks up stations all across the dial utilizing the "wave magnet" internal loop antenna, which works quite well. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, he checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. A new power cord and audio cable were added. Gary refinished the walnut Art Deco cabinet with his usual mastery, ending up with "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original brown knobs and speaker. We added a new period correct grille cloth, a new dial cover and a new reproduction back. This radio is seldom seen, possibly due to lower production numbers right before the war. Nice piece for the Zenith collector, and just a real beauty for any collection! 13"W x 7-1/2"H x 7"D. $449.00. (1600343)

 

Zenith 6-S-27 (1936)

Zenith 6-S-27 (1936)

During the summer of 1935, Zenith came out with a new tombstone design. The most obvious change was the size; these radios were two feet tall and commanded attention with room-shaking volume. Zenith added a smaller version of their big, black multicolored dial, and the radio also had the new design features of the console radios. The 6-S-27 is a six-tube, three-band (SB+SWx2) set. We replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio input were added. This radio has excellent sensitivity and tons of volume. Gary stripped the unique cabinet that has Maple and Walnut veneers and is trimmed with Australian Laurel. The inset grille design is a smaller version of the grille on the 12-A-58 console. After painting and grain filling, Gary finished the radio with a few coats of lacquer, and hand-polished to a gorgeous luster. The set has the original wood "Z" knobs, chassis, speaker, and a reproduction grille cloth was installed. We have had a few of these over the years, but they usually are sold before we can post them on the Attic. Not this time, however! 23"H x 17"W x 14"D. $995.00. (1600412)

 

Zenith 705 (1934)

Zenith 705 (1934)

In 1933, FDR had been elected president as the country was experiencing a severe depression. Unlike most companies, Zenith had a huge surplus of cash, and produced 125 models, the 200, 400, 500 and 600 model series for 1933, up from just 25 the year before. Several models were carried over to 1934, and the 700 series radios, called the "Challenger" series came out. The 705 is a six-tube, AM only, AC powered radio. We replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. We then checked the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and a new antenna lead. The radio has good sensitivity across the dial and plays with good tone and plenty of volume. Gary stripped the burl walnut and mahogany cabinet. He ended up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, dial scale, speaker and chassis. A beautiful "mantle" radio (Zenith didn't make many) to grace your collection. 15-1/2"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. $549.00. (1600396)
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About Joe's Radio Shop

Shipping

At Joe's Radio Shop we do everything in our power to make sure our radios are packed with the utmost of care and protection.  We use double-sided boxes lined with Styrofoam creating a box within a box.  The radio has bubble wrap placed inside to protect the tubes, then double wrapped in bubble wrap and placed on packing peanuts on the bottom of the box.  The sides around the bubble wrapped radio are filled with packing peanuts and a piece of Styrofoam is placed on top of the radio and the box is then sealed.  Our larger radios and consoles have the speakers removed and are professionally packed by Diversified Packing and shipped via Greyhound.  We have never had any damage to any of our shipped radios.  We will ship radios with the company that offers the best rate; Fed-Ex, UPS, USPS and DHL are the preferred carriers.  Let us know if you have a preference for shipping.  Packages are shipped within three business days of payment.  Consoles and large radios may take a little longer due to a more involved packing process.  Tracking numbers will be provided to you, and we track the packages as well.

Payment

Joe's Radio Shop accepts payment through PayPal, credit cards (we use the Square, which requires a 3.75% fee) and checks.  Payment plus shipping must be deposited before we ship your radio to you.  Checks must clear our bank before shipping.  Joe's Radio Shop will not provide or sell your personal information to anyone.  Credit card information is shredded and discarded after the charge is made and deposited.  Upon ordering, you will receive an invoice via email with cost plus shipping charges.  A receipt will arrive with the radio.

Don't like the price? Give us an offer!

Joe's Radio Shop return policy:

We accept returns, but we would first try to resolve any issues and make sure your radio is functioning as it should.  A few guidelines for vintage tube radios to function properly:
1. Most radios need an antenna to function properly.  10-20 feet of wire connected to the "A" lug in the back of the chassis, which we will provide to you.  Some radios have internal antennas, or "loops."  For the most part, these radios should receive broadcast or "AM" stations in your area.
2. Multiple band radios that have 1-3 short wave bands will also need plenty of antenna.  There isn't much going on these day with short wave.  Many short wave stations have moved to satellite or the internet.  There are a few out there, and a good antenna is needed.  Ask us about antennas; we can describe how to make them to use at your home.  Try to place your radio on an outside wall, the reception will be better, especially with console radios.  Police and aviation (now UHF) bands no longer function in today's world.
3. There are things in a household that can cause static and interference.  Computers, fluorescent lighting, lighting potentiometers (dimmer switch), microwave ovens, digital TV and possibly your wi-fi system.  Try to keep the radio out of proximity to these devices.
4. Running the radio for long periods of time can can them to overheat causing damage.

Please contact us within seven days for a possible return.  E-mail us at joesradioshop1@gmail.com or phone us at 503-209-8414.  Our radios come with a six  month guarantee from the purchase date.  Any electrical damage or failure will be repaired free of cost minus materials and shipping.  If there is damage from shipping, the claim has to go through the shipper.  If we determine the damage is the shipper or buyers fault, we can negotiate a repair price.  If an issue can't be resolved to the buyer's liking, we will offer a full refund minus shipping and insurance.  If the buyer pays the shipper directly, the buyer assumes all responsibility for insurance settlements due to damage while in transit.  When shipping a radio back to us, please follow our packing guidelines listed under Shipping.  If the radio is improperly packed, the refund will be denied.



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