Joe Millward's Attic
"Selling radios at the Radio Attic since August 2017"

the Radio Attic


 

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We are having a 60 day Pre-Christmas sale!

Do some early Christmas shopping by choosing a beautifully restored, antique radio
for that special collector in your life! Sale prices in effect through December 1.

 

Airline 62-702 (1939)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Airline 62-702 (1939)

Montgomery Wards sold at least one million radios, and they didn't manufacture anything. Starting with catalog sales of radios in 1922 and in 1926, at retail outlets. The list of manufacturers of Airline radios is long. Wells-Gardner, Belmont, Davidson-Haynes, US Radio Corp.and Kingston Radio. Here is a list of the manufactures abbreviations used on many labels of Airline radios: AA, BR, CB, CCB, GAA, GHM, GSE, GSL, GWM, HA, JB, JP, KP, KR, WG and others! The 62-702 is a seven-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set that features a tuning eye tube. This radio has great sensitivity, and picks up several stations. All of the capacitors have been replaced. Resistors and tubes checked. We put a new eye tube in, and it's bright and active. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and safety fuse. Gary did a fantastic job on the cabinet. The quilted maple band around the top and bottom contrast with the darker walnut and really set this radio off. We used the original knobs and speaker, and new period-correct grille cloth. A beautiful and good performing radio to grace any collection. 20"W x 12"H x 9-1/2"D. Was $599.00, now $549.00. (1600202)

 

Arvin 528CS "Phantom Mate" Chairside (1938)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Arvin 528CS "Phantom Mate" Chairside (1938)

Arvin was based in Columbus, Indiana and was the radio brand name manufactured by Noblitt-Sparks. There were four companies with the first starting on 1919 as Indianapolis Air Pump, to car radios in 1933 to home radios in 1935 as Noblitt-Sparks and Arvin. They created "families" of radios, starting with the "Rhythm Series" in 1936 and the "Phantom Series" in 1937. Many of these radios are highly collectable, with the "Rhythm King" being one of the hardest radios to find. The 528cs was called the "Phantom Mate" and utilizes a five-tube, two-band (SB,Police) radio and Arvin designed the "Phantom Filter Circuit" giving the line its name. The capacitors have all been replaced. We checked resistors and tubes and replaced where needed. The radio plays well using about 20 feet of antenna, which we have provided. The walnut cabinet, knobs and grille cloth are all original and in perfect condition. This is a one-owner radio that was well taken care of in a non-smoking home. This rare radio is gorgeous and a wonderful addition to anyone's collection! Small for a chairside at 22" H x 12"W x 19"D. Was $599.00, now $499.00. (1600160)

 

Arvin 618-A "Phantom Maid" (1938)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Arvin 618-A "Phantom Maid" (1938)

Noblitt-Sparks Industries started in 1921 in Indianapolis and in 1931 moved to Columbus, Indiana. They manufactured radios under the Arvin name, as well as automobile equipment, kitchen appliances, cookware and televisions. This large radio compares to the Crosley "Super 8" and the Zenith 5-S-119 in size and performance. The 618A is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. This radio has tons of volume utilizing an 8-inch speaker. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. We installed a new power cord, safety fuse and an audio cable for your external listening device. The new tuning eye tube is bright and active. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet, and refinished it using high-quality fillers and toners. He applied several coats of lacquer, then hand-rubbed the cabinet for that "factory fresh" lacquer finish. The radio sports a beautiful maple inlay across the front and top of the set. We were able to find the correct knobs as a few were missing. The chassis and speaker are original, and we added a new, period-correct repro grille cloth. A gorgeous and unique Arvin "Phantom" series radio for you collection! 19"W x 10"H x 9"D. Was $599.00, now $499.00. (1600250)

 

Atwater Kent 856 (1935)

NEW!

Atwater Kent 856 (1935)

Since this radio was made in 1935 and Atwater Kent stopped production in 1936, I thought I would give a little post-history. Arthur Kent went into Florida real estate after closing the plant. Now a millionaire, he moved to Los Angeles and built a mansion on the highest hill. He would throw lavish parties, dressing up as the "Mad Hatter" from "Alice In Wonderland." He was quite a character and passed away in 1949. The Atwater Kent 856 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked the resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. He added a new Bakelite plug, audio cable and a safety fuse. These are excellent radios as it picked up several stations without an antenna. The dial light changes as you change bands, a cool feature. This radio is basically original. Gary cleaned up the cabinet and basically left it alone. The set has the original knobs, grille cloth, speaker and chassis. I believe it led a sheltered life...the original sales tag was still inside the cabinet! You don't see this model show up very often. It's a good looking, great playing radio! 19"H x 14"W x 10"D. $799.00. (1600319)

 

Crosley 148 "Fiver" Cathedral (1932)

Crosley 148 "Fiver" Cathedral (1932)

Powell Crosley started the Crosley Radio Corporation in Cincinnati Ohio in 1921 making crystal sets. He slowly built his business, buying other radio companies that had various radio patents. An association with Deforest Radio Company gave him access to the RCA patent pool to produce Superheterodyne radios. His high-volume manufacturing technique got him the nickname the "Henry Ford Of Radios." The "Fiver" is a five-tube, AM only radio. An early Superheterodyne, the radio performs well across the dial. Blake went in and replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and audio cable were installed. The original speaker, knobs and chassis are present. A new reproduction grille cloth was installed. Gary refinished the set and applied a semi-gloss lacquer finish. A great entry-level radio for first-time collectors, and a wonderful set for the Crosley collector. 14"H x 11-1/2"W x 9"D. $389.00. (1600278)

 

Crosley 517 "Fiver Deluxe" (1937)

NEW!

Crosley 517 "Fiver Deluxe" (1937)

In 1924, the Crosley Corporation opened a plant that could produce 5000 radios a day, including the cabinets. Due to the assembly line manufacturing they were called "The Henry Ford of Radio." The Model 517 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. Close to a dozen Crosley models used the chassis or the name "Fiver." The outstanding feature is the glass "reflective dial." We replaced all of the capacitors. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, audio cable, antenna lead and safety fuse were added. The radio plays with plenty of volume with good sensitivity across the dial. Gary stripped the walnut veneer and refinished the radio with high quality toners and lacquer. The end product is beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The original knobs, speaker and chassis are present, along with a period-correct replacement grille cloth. A note: There is a gold mirror behind the dial scale that is printed on the dial glass that creates a reflection when photographed. This is a perfect example one a "Fiver" tombstone. Make it yours! 12-1/2"H x 11"W x 7-1/2"D. $425.00. (1600316)

 

Delco R-1116 (1938)

Delco R-1116 (1938)

The Deco 1100 series radios were well made and highly collectable. Each one has a nickname, R-1116 is called the "Chieftain II." The R1116 is noted for its large, multi-colored dial. This six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio is a strong performer, utilizing an 8-inch speaker producing tons of audio. We replaced all of the capacitors, checked resistors and tubes, replacing where necessary. A safety fuse and cable for external devices was installed. The cabinet was stripped and refinished using the best toner, grain filler and lacquers available. The knobs, dial and speaker are all original to the set. 22"W x 12-1/2"H x 10"D. $449.00. (1600162)

 

Detrola 200 (1938)

Detrola 200 (1938)

Detrola was started in 1930 in Detroit, MI by Jack Ross. Over the period of 17 years, he built the company into the 6th largest radio manufacturer in the world. Most of the radios didn't even carry the Detrola name...in fact one assembly line was dedicated to Truetone. At one point they were making sets for over 100 brands. The model 200 is a very rare set. I could find nothing on the internet after looking for over an hour, but I did find a model 254 that had the same chassis and was built for Monarch. It's a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord, audio cable, antenna lead and safety fuse were installed. Gary did a fantastic job on this rare Detrola. This walnut set with matched Madrone veneer on top has a red vinyl strip inlay, telling us it's an Ingraham cabinet. The radio retains the original knobs, grille cloth, dial scale and chassis. A new crystal clear dial cover by Mark Palmquist completes this cabinet. This is the only documented model 200 out there. Make it yours! 14-1/2"W x 9-1/2"H x 7"D. $499.00. (1600297)

 

DeWald 537 (1939)

DeWald 537 (1939)

David Wald started the Pierce Airo Radio Manufacturing Corporation in New York City around 1921. The name changed to DeWald around 1930. DeWald is recognized for having several collectable Catalin radio models. The 537 is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) AC/DC radio. The radio chassis was restored by the previous owner, and meets the requirements for our guarantee. The capacitors were all replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and antenna lead. The cabinet is solid walnut with no veneers and was refinished by Gary Marvin to a nice semi-gloss finish. The knobs, chassis, speaker and dial scale are original. Gary added a new, crystal clear dial cover. The radio is pretty rare and is making a first appearance on the Radio Attic. A nice radio with a great price for your collection. 10"W x 6"H x 5"D. $299.00. (1600299)

 

Emerson 26 (1935)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Emerson 26 (1935)

Here we have a rare Emerson five-tube radio that I had never seen before. I did find a Radio Museum listing for it, and that's about all. A simple mini-tombstone design, with a little bit of inlay around the diameter. The radio has been restored in and out with capacitors being replaced, resistors checked and replaced where needed, tubes checked, and an alignment for top performance. A nice refinish by Gary Marvin. It plays well across the dial with an antenna. Was $449.00, now $299.00. (1600006)

 

Emerson 250-AW "All Wave" (1933)

NEW!

Emerson 250-AW "All Wave" (1933)

These early Emersons were referred to as "midget radios." They were priced low due to the Depression and were very successful for the company. They were small with handsome cabinets and could be used in other rooms of the house. Emerson had several models of this design, and they sold hundreds of thousands of them. This prompted other companies to come up with their own "midget" radios. The 250-AW is a five-tube, two-band (AM,Police) AC/DC radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. A new power cord and antenna lead were installed. This radio does not have a first audio circuit, so an audio cable could not be installed. The Gothic-designed Ingraham cabinet was stripped and beautifully refinished by Gary Marvin. All of the correct knobs and brass badges are with the set, as is the original wooden back.The grille cloth is a period-correct reproduction. This is a really nice 250-AW, and it's ready for your collection! 10"W x 8"H x 5"D. $399.00. (1600321)

 

Emerson 547-A (1947)

Emerson 547-A (1947)

Emerson Phonograph Company was founded in 1915 in New York City by Victor Hugo Emerson. His first factories opened in 1920 in Chicago and Boston. It operated in obscurity until 1932, when it came out with the "Pee Wee" radio which was a great seller for the company. By the time the company entered war production, it had one-sixth of the U.S. radio production. The 547-A is a five-tube, AM only AC/DC radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. He then installed a new power cord, and an external audio cable is available by request at no charge. The radio is a strong performer utilizing an internal "loop" antenna. The Ebony Bakelite case is in perfect condition with no cracks or chips. It has the original knobs and back. This radio performs with great sensitivity across the dial with good tone and plenty of volume. 9"W x 5-1/2"H x 5-1/2"D. $179.00. (1600313)

 

Emerson FP422 (1941)

Emerson FP422 (1941)

Emerson made a lot of radios, hundreds of models. They were the first company to use Ingraham cabinets, and by far had the most models utilizing them. The model FP422 has an Ingraham cabinet, the Ingraham badge was right in the middle of the radio back, which was missing on this radio. The FP422 is a five-tube, AM only radio. This model has good sensitivity across the dial. We replaced all of the capacitors. All the resistors were out-of-tolerance and we replaced with new equivalents. Four of the five tubes were replaced. We added a new power cord and installed an audio cable for your external device. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet, ending up with a beautiful "piano" finish. All of the original knobs are present. We installed a new crystal-clear dial cover and a new reproduction back.Here is a perfect example go an FP422 for you Emerson collectors, and just a gorgeous radio for any collection. 11-1/2"W x 8-1/4"H x 7"D. $399.00. (1600284)

 

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson R-158 (1937)

Emerson started producing phonographs in 1915 in New York City, and is still producing products today. Emerson has made phonographs, radios, televisions, air conditioners, and later on it made refrigerators, computers, defibrillators, CD players and VCRs. The R-158 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,police) set. It was offered with a TV band at one time as well. Blake started the chassis restore by replacing all of the capacitors. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, safety fuse and audio cable were installed. The radio has very good sensitivity across the dial, and performs with nice tone and plenty of volume. Gary refinished the rosewood and walnut cabinet with the best products. This is an Ingraham cabinet and the Ingraham badge is present. The unique cabinet is accented with two brass strips that cross over the top and down the front of the set. The radio has the original dial with a new clear dial cover, knobs, grille cloth and speaker. Gary finished with a beautiful lacquer "piano" finish. A really nice looking and performing set for your collection. 15"W x 9-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. $499.00. (1600272)

 

Firestone Air Chief S-7398-3 "Cosmopolitan" (1942)

Firestone Air Chief S-7398-3 "Cosmopolitan" (1942)

Firestone sponsored the "Voice of Firestone" radio program which started in 1928. In 1949 the program was simulcast on NBC television. You can't help but think this helped Firestone sell a lot of radios out of their tire stores all over the world. The "Air Chief" brand was trademarked in 1940 and was first used on air conditioners, their own record label, and then expanded to radios. The S-7398-3 was a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) AC/DC set. I believe the chassis was made by Belmont or Stewart-Warner. This radio has great fidelity including lots of bass response. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. He installed an audio cable to hook up external devices such as an iPad or Bluetooth unit. Gary performed his mastery in refinishing the walnut, maple and mahogany veneers. He applied a couple of coats of lacquer and hand-rubbed the radio to a gorgeous luster. The original dial is perfect and we installed a new, crystal-clear dial cover and a new reproduction grille cloth. The radio has the original knobs, chassis and speaker. A beautiful set for a great price! 18"W x 10-1/2"H x 9"D. $449.00. (1600268)

 

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson-Bell 62 "Fleur-de-Lis" (1932)

Jackson Bell started radio production in Los Angeles, CA in 1926. Herb Bell began the business with his brother Elmer. Gilfillan made the chassis and Elmer made the cabinets. At one time or another, the whole family was involved in the business, including their father Anton. In 1929, Herb became partners with Mr. Jackson, and the company ceased operations in 1933. The model 62 is a six-tube, AM only radio. The radio had been restored by the previous owner, and Blake checked it out making sure it met our standards. A period-correct cloth power cord was installed. An audio cable is not available for this radio. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet. He finished the radio with a satin finish. The radio is gorgeous and has the original knobs and grille cloth. Also present is the often-missing "velvet tone" label located on the lower front of the radio. I think this tag is found only on the Fleur-de-Lis model. Other designs are the Swan, Tulip, Sunburst, Peacock, and the iconic Peter pan. If you are looking for a Fleur-de-Lis for your collection, it would be difficult to find one better than this one. 15"H x 13"W x 8-1/2"D. $699.00. (1600303)

 

Philco 45C "Butterfly" (1934)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Philco 45C "Butterfly" (1934)

In 1906, Philco started out as the Philadelphia Storage Battery Company making batteries for cars and trucks. The Philco name didn't appear until 1919, and they didn't produce their first radio until 1928. After aggressive advertising and product development, Philco became the third largest company selling 400,000 radios by 1929. The 45C is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. There were two "Butterfly" radios, the other is the 28C, and two console models utilizing the same chassis. The capacitors have been replaced with modern equivalents. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where needed. A safety fuse and power cord were added, and we installed a cable for iPad, Bluetooth etc. The radio performs well with good sensitivity across the dial. Gary completely refinished the radio, which was a daunting task. Several areas had to be masked off and done very carefully. The black on the sides and top was very difficult and required hand-finishing to get that great luster. The knobs, grille cloth, speaker and the all-important back are all original. This is a perfect Butterfly, and it won't be around for long! 19"W x 9-1/2"H x 8"D. Was $995.00, now $895.00. (1600221)

 

Philco 91B "Baby Grand" (1933)

Philco 91B "Baby Grand" (1933)

The model 91B was the top of the Philco line in 1933. Designed by Clyde Shuler, this nine-tube, two-band (SB, police) is the second series model 91B and plays with good tone and sensitivity. The police band is no longer in use. This radio features tuned RF, base-compensating four-point tone control and a shadow meter for precise tuning. It is the improved version of the model 90 of the previous year. The wax/paper capacitors have been changed with new, long-lasting mylar capacitors. The tubes and resistors were tested and replaced as needed. A safety fuse and audio cable have been installed, and a precise alignment completes the restoration. This iconic cathedral is as pristine as an 85 year old radio can be. The original finish is flawless and still has its semi-gloss patina. The chassis is in great condition with its zinc-oxide coating. The grille cloth, speaker and knobs are original to the set. This is a large full-size cathedral and weighs 37 pounds. 20"H x 16-1/2"W x 12"D. $499.00. (1600144)

 

RCA 6-T (1936)

RCA 6-T (1936)

In 1921, David Sarnoff started RCA as General Manager, and remained until 1970. By 1926, they already controlled the commercial radio industry, buying radio stations, and then formed NBC. Eventually, NBC was broken up into the other networks ABC and CBS. More on RCA in upcoming ads. The 6-T is a six-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. He added a new power cord, external audio cable (Bluetooth, iPhone, iPad) and a safety fuse. RCA made great sets, and this radio plays strong and picks up plenty of stations across the dial. Gary stripped the cabinet. The burl walnut on the front is a nice contrast to the American Walnut found on the sides. Gary did beautiful work, and ended up with a "piano" lacquer finish. This radio has the original knobs, grille cloth, chassis, copper bezel, dial scale and 8-inch speaker. This fine example of an RCA 6-T would look perfect in your collection! 18-1/2"H x 13-1/2"W x 8-1/2"D. $599.00. (1600312)

 

RCA 103 (1935)

RCA 103 (1935)

The RCA 103 is a regenerative super-het. It contains a very unique circuit that was used a lot in radios from the mid 1920's, and could also be found in the popular Philco 84. This four-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio has really good sensitivity across the dial and good fidelity. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked all of the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. He installed a new power cord, so this radio is ready to go! Gary stripped and refinished the radio. He finished with a gorgeous lacquer "piano" finish, making this 103 one of the nicer ones you'll find. A unique and hard-to-find radio, perfect for any serious collector. 14"H x 11-1/2"W x 7"D. $399.00. (1600244)

 

RCA BX-57 (1951)

RCA BX-57 (1951)

Where do you start writing about RCA? This company dominated the electronics industry from 1919 to 1970, the entire time under the direction of David Sarnoff. He acquired Marconi, Westinghouse, NBC, and many other major companies. He owned the patents on the Superheterodyne radios that most companies couldn't afford to acquire, and his tyrannical business practices were legendary. The BX-57 is a four-tube, AM only AC/DC "portable" radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors with modern equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where necessary. The radio plays well across the dial utilizing an internal "loop" antenna. The radio appears to never have been used, and it still has the original RCA price tag on it! The cabinet shows minimal wear, and there are no chips or cracks. Gary hand-polished the radio, and it looks like he just pulled it off a shelf in a store! A wonderful, like new original RCA radio! 11"W x 8"H x 5"D. $269.00. (1600305)

 

RCA "Master Nipper" (1947)

RCA "Master Nipper" (1947)

Here we have a very stylish, Canadian-made "Master Nipper" (yes, that's the model) RCA Bakelite radio from 1947. This five-tube, AM only radio is a small but has a big sound. The radio has had all the capacitors replaced, resistors and tubes check and replaced where needed. After a precision alignment and sporting a tuned internal loop antenna, "Nipper" has great sensitivity across the dial. The case has no damage and has been polished to a beautiful luster. 10"W x 6-1/2"H x 6"D. $199.00. (1600127)

 

Sentinel 293W (1946)

Sentinel 293W (1946)

The Sentinel Radio Corp. was located in Evanston, Illinois, and manufactured radios, televisions and phonographs from 1930 to 1957. Some brands were Erla, Wings and Musicaire which were sold in Coast to Coast stores. This six-tube, AM only Bakelite radio has had all of the capacitors replaced, along with resistors and tubes checked and replaced as needed. The radio utilizes an internal loop antenna and receives the AM band with sensitivity and volume. The case has no cracks and has been polished. A really nice radio at a great price! 11-1/2"W x 7-1/2"H x 6"D. $139.00. (1600140)

 

Silvertone 3869 (1938)

Silvertone 3869 (1938)

They are some models of radios where one can't find much information, and this Silvertone is one of them. What I do know is that it was made by Mission Bell, who was a Los Angeles company. I am also going to guess that it was made in the Gilfillan factory. One thing I have noticed is that a lot of Gilfillan chassis bolts come up from the bottom of the cabinet through the chassis and are fastened by a nut on TOP of the chassis. This is the case with this radio. The 3869 is a six-tube, AM only, AC radio. It has plenty of volume and good selectivity across the dial. The chassis restoration was done by a known radio guy in Oregon. The capacitors were all replaced, the resistors and tubes checked and replaced where needed. A new antenna lead was installed and I put an audio cable in for your external devise. The cabinet is original (restored). The knobs, grille cloth and speaker are all original to the radio. The Art Deco dial is in perfect condition and lights up nicely. This is a good-looking walnut cabinet and a very good performer. This radio will give you many years of listening pleasure and is priced to sell! 14"W x 8"H x 7"D. $399.00. (1600300)

 

Silvertone 4765 (1937)

NEW!

Silvertone 4765 (1937)

This is the second Silvertone radio I have had with this gorgeous glass dial. The chassis was made by Colonial and was used in a few other models, including the 4565 that I had, with the addition of pushbutton presets. The dial is glass with the scale printed on the reverse side. These big Silvertones had volume, fidelity and features that matched console radios. The 4765 is an eight-tube, three-band (SB,SW,Police) radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. A new power cord and antenna lead were installed. The eye tube is bright and active. Gary did a fantastic job stripping this radio which had been painted with thick enamel paint. Underneath that paint was a beautiful walnut cabinet with a nice burl walnut on the front. The Tenite knobs and dial bezel are original. We added a nice reproduction grille cloth and finished up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. This radio has fantastic sound with tons of volume and a three-position tone control. A big sounding impressive radio for your collection! 19-1/2"W x 12-1/2"H x 11"D. $799.00. (1600322)

 

Silvertone 6218 (1939)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Silvertone 6218 (1939)

The 4000, 5000, and 6000 series of Silvertone radios remind me of 1936-1939 years of Zenith radio manufacturing. Zenith was on the cutting edge of electronics and design, and Silvertone was doing the same thing with their manufacturers. Silvertone had a "keeping up with the Jonses" mentality. Some of my favorite Silvertone sets have 4000 and 6000 model numbers. They had "big dial" sets, large tube count table and consoles, some of which are just as iconic as the Zenith "big dial" radios. The 6218 is a seven-tube, two-band (SB,SW) radio is a very good performer on both bands. This radio was a six volt set as well as a 120 volt set. Blake installed a new transformer making it a 120VAC radio only. He replaced all of the capacitors, checked tubes and resistors, replacing where needed. A new power cord, audio cable and a safety fuse were installed. The radio has a new, bright and active eye tube and has great sensitivity across the dial The radio cabinet is original. Blake cleaned it up and it has original knobs and push buttons. The dial scale is original and like new. A large, unique radio that's in fantastic condition. 21"W x 11"H x 9-1/2"D. Was $429.00, now $399.00. (1600247)

 

Sparton 57 (1935)

Sparton 57 (1935)

The brand name Sparton was a product of Sparks-Withington of Jackson, Michigan. We might note that the Michigan State Spartan football team bears the same name, with a different spelling, and a different town too. Hmmm? Anyway, in 1934/35, Sparks-Withington produced 3.8 million radios making it one of the larger producers of radios and tubes in the USA. The model 57 was an AC-DC, superheterodyne set with five tubes and two bands (SB,SW). The radio has an AVC circuit and great sensitivity on both bands. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked and replaced all resistors and tubes. A safety fuse was added as well as a new power cord, replacing the fire hazard "curtain burner" resistance line cord. The radio was aligned and plays loud and strong. Gary refinished the cabinet with his usual finesse. He completed by applying lacquer and hand-rubbing a gorgeous "piano" finish. This radio is an early, rare Sparton that belongs in your collection! 9-1/2"W x 7-3/4"H x 4-1/2"D. $299.00. (1600195)

 

Stewart-Warner 1302 (1935)

Stewart-Warner 1302 (1935)

Stewart-Warner, based in Chicago, started manufacturing radios in 1925. Up to then they were a very successful company making automotive instruments. The company over-produced radios, making 1000 sets a day. This forced them to sell at reduced rates, not a good business model. The instrument division was always a success and carried the company to profitability. The 1302 is a five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set. The radios were well made and were good performers. Blake did his usual profession restoration process. All of the capacitors were replaced with new equivalents. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. He installed a new power cord, audio cable and safety fuse. The radio has a really nice original finish. Gary cleaned it up and "spiffed" up the radio with a few coats of lacquer, then polished it to a gorgeous "piano" finish. He installed a reproduction of the original grille cloth. The knobs, speaker, dial and chassis are all original. A really great radio at a great price! 17-1/2"W x 12"H x 9"D. $599.00. (1600255)

 

Stromberg-Carlson 225H (1937)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Stromberg-Carlson 225H (1937)

In 1894, Stromberg-Carlson started producing telephones, and by 1900 they were the leader among all of the other telephone manufacturers. They made all of the phones and switchboards used by the signal corps in WWI, and continued producing communication equipment during WWII. They started manufacturing radios in 1923, and obtained an RCA patent for superheterodyne sets in 1927. The 225H is a five-tube, three-band (SBxSWx2) AC/DC set. Stromberg-Carlson was well known for having quality radios, and even though it has just five tubes, the 225H is a strong performer. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. An audio cable was installed for your external devices, a new antenna was wired in and a new power cord finished the chassis repair. Gary stripped the the cabinet and restored it to a beautiful lacquer finish. The cabinet has Brazilian Rosewood, Walnut and Maple veneers and inlays. The original knobs, chassis and speaker are present, and we added a period-correct grille cloth. The artistry and design of the Art Deco cabinet produced a stunning and highly desirable radio to grace anyone's collection. 16"W x 9"H x 8"D. Was $799.00, now $699.00. (1600264)

 

Trav-Ler TR-287-B "Power Mite" (1958)

Trav-Ler TR-287-B "Power Mite" (1958)

Joe's Radio Shop does complete and long lasting restorations of vintage and antique radios. This 1958 Trav-Ler Super Six is a six-transistor AM only radio made in the USA. Any defective transistors and capacitors have been replaced and a proper alignment ensures years of service. The nine volt battery connector has been changed to accommodate a modern nine volt battery. The ivory and red case is in exceptional condition with no chips or cracks and it shows very little wear. $125.00. (1600159)

 

Troy 4 "Deluxe" (1937)

Troy 4 "Deluxe" (1937)

Troy Radio Manufacturing Company/Radio and Television Company started up in Los Angeles in 1932 and went out of business right before WWII. Most of the chassis were made by Gilfillan, and the cabinets were of a high quality. They made several models from four-tube mantle radios to eleven-tube consoles. Even though "Television" is in their business name, I don't think they ever made any, going out of business before anyone was manufacturing them. The Model 4 is a four-tube, AM only. TRF (tuned radio frequency) set. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. He added a new power cable and antenna lead, but this set has no audio cable due to its circuitry. For a four-tube set, it's a good performer with plenty of volume and good tone. Gary refinished the walnut cabinet using the best toners, grain fillers and lacquer. The radio retains the original chassis, speaker, dial and knobs. A new dial cover was added. This is a rare Los Angeles radio, and will look great in any collection! 11"W x 9"H x 7"D. $379.00. (1600295)

 

Truetone D-712 "Egyptian" (1938)

NEW!

Truetone D-712 "Egyptian" (1938)

The "Egyptian" is one of the most sought after collectable radios in the world. With the discovery of King Tut's tomb in 1922, the Egyptian motif was all the rage. The combination of a fantastic Art-Deco design with motorized electronic tuning made for big sales numbers. Manufactured by Detrola initially, there were two more companies, Silvertone and Truetone that sold the same radio. They are very similar, with a nine-tube or an eight-tube chassis with two different cabinet designs. The D-712 is a nine-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked the resistors and tubes replacing where needed. He installed a new power cord, audio cable, antenna lead and a safety fuse. The motorized tuner works perfectly. Gary stripped the cabinet made up of Walnut, Burl Walnut, Maple and Australian Laurel. He finished with a beautiful hard lacquer "piano" finish. The original knobs and grille cloth are present and the speaker has been re-coned. The push-buttons are reproduction and a crystal-clear dial cover from Mark Palmquist. The exquisite radio is rare and highly collectable. They don't get much better than this! 22"W x 13"H x 9"D. $3,495.00. (1600320)

 

Truetone D-1001 "Sentry" (1939)

Truetone D-1001 "Sentry" (1939)

In 1909, George Pepperdine (who later founded Pepperdine University) started the Western Auto Supply Company in Kansas City, MO. Eventually the company had several thousand people employed in every major city across the USA. Truetone was the Eastern brand, and Western Air Patrol was the Western brand. He sold the company in 1939, and was later known as Western Auto. The D-1001 is actually a clock radio. The set is a five-tube, AM only radio with an electric clock. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. The clock works and keeps good time. The radio performs well across the dial. He added a new power cable, an MP3 cable and a new antenna wire. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet and ended up with a gorgeous "piano" lacquer finish. He added a crystal clear dial cover. The radio retains the original knobs, grille cloth and speaker. This unique and beautiful clock radio is ready for your collection! 10"W x 7"H x 5"D. $495.00. (1600290)

 

Truetone D-2615 "Stratoscope" (1946)

Truetone D-2615 "Stratoscope" (1946)

I've written in previous ads about George Pepperdine (who later started Pepperdine University) starting Western Auto Supply in Kansas City in 1909. He expanded the company to Los Angeles, and in 1939, sold it to Gamble-Skogmo of Chicago and retired. The company continued to grow with 1200 stores and 600 franchise stores. The D2516 is a six-tube, AM only AC/DC set. The chassis was made by Belmont, and the radio has great sensitivity with an internal "loop" antenna. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked resistors and tubes replacing where necessary. A new polarized power cord and audio cable were added. The radio was aligned and is a strong performer across the dial. The black Bakelite cabinet is in very good condition with no cracks or crazing and was hand-polished to a gorgeous luster. The original knobs and back are with the radio. This radio will offer many years of listening pleasure, and we stand behind our workmanship. 11"W x 8"H x 6"D. $299.00. (1600304)

 

US Radio (Apex) 8-A (1931)

US Radio (Apex) 8-A (1931)

US Apex was based in Chicago and started producing radios in 1925 as the Apex Electric Pool, later known as the US Radio and Television Corp. Brand names they used were, Apex, Gloritone, Mantola, Carlton, Radiotrope and others. In 1933 they merged with Grunow and became General Household Utilities Company. The 8-A is an eight-tube, broadcast band only set. Produced in 1931, it was one of the earlier super-hets sold commercially. It incorporates an AVC circuit, probably one of the earlier radios to do so. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. Checked resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. He added a new cloth power cord and installed a safety fuse. the radio plays great with plenty of volume through the original 8-inch speaker. The two toggle switches on the side are on-off, and Hi power-Lo power which is basically a local-distant station boost. Gary stripped the cabinet and refinished with a beautiful semi-gloss lacquer finish. The set has its original knobs and a reproduction grille cloth. A very unique and beautiful radio! 17-1/2"H x 16"W x 11-1/2"D. $599.00. (1600190)

 

Western Air Patrol 76 (1935)

NEW!

Western Air Patrol 76 (1935)

Western Auto Supply of California started selling radios under the Western Air Patrol brand in 1925. The radios were manufactured by Gilfillan in Los Angeles under Gilfillan's RCA patent. By the late 1930's, Western Auto Supply had 150 stores west of the Rockies, and in 1939 were sold to Gambles. There were no Western Air Patrol radios sold after 1939. The model 76 is a seven-tube, three-band (SB,SW,Police) and was the top-of-the-line table set for WAP in 1935. Blake replaced all of the capacitors and checked all of the resistors and tubes, replacing where necessary. He installed a new power cord, audio cable, two new antenna leads (AM and SW) and a safety fuse. The radio plays with lots of sensitivity across the dial. There is plenty of volume with very good fidelity. Gary did a masterful job stripping heavy enamel paint, doing veneer repairs, and finished with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The knobs, dial scale and 8-inch Jensen speaker are original to the radio. These radios are very rare. They are quite large measuring almost two feet in width and 12" high. This beautiful, unique radio can be yours! 23-1/2"W x 11-1/2"H x 11-1/2"D. $699.00. (1600317)

 

Wilcox-Gay A-15AC (1936)

Wilcox-Gay A-15AC (1936)

The Wilcox Company started making amateur radio components and kits in 1910 in Charlotte, Michigan. By 1926 they started manufacturing consumer radios. Paul Gay joined the company in 1936 and formed the Wilcox-Gay Corporation. They came out with the Recordio in 1939, and musicians Johnny Cash and Les Paul started recording records on it, just to name a few. The A-15AC is a five-tube, (the ballast tube could be considered the sixth) three-band (SB,SW Police) AC/DC radio. The radio was restored by the previous owner, and we went through the chassis and brought it up to our standard of performance and guarantee. We added a polarized power cord and audio cable. The design of this radio screams Art Deco, also referred to as "Moderne" during the depression. Gary refinished the radio, ending up with a beautiful "piano" finish. The grille is black-painted steel, and the dial is multi-colored and large. The knobs, chassis and dial are original and Gary added a period-correct reproduction grille cloth and a crystal-clear dial cover. Looking for a totally unique radio for your collection? Here it is! 15"H x 12"W x 8"D. $995.00. (1600301)

 

Zenith 4T26 (1935)

Zenith 4T26 (1935)

The 4T26 is a pretty rare Zenith set. It is a four-tube radio, but performs amazingly well. Basically a small tombstone, there was an early version and a late version. The noticeable difference is in the dial, with two or three different colors and shapes. This was an entry level radio for Zenith, but with a nice cabinet with decent performance. They also offered a console with this chassis, again with different dials available. I have never seen the console version. The 4T26 is a four-tube, two-band (SB,police) superheterodyne radio. We replaced all of the capacitors, checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. I installed a new power cord and audio cable for your external devices. Gary stripped the cabinet and finished up with a "factory fresh piano" finish. The cabinet features walnut with black walnut inserts. I added a new grille cloth and a crystal clear dial cover. The original knobs and speaker are with the set. A unique, seldom seen Zenith you can point out to fellow collectors. 14"H x 12"W x 7"D. $499.00. (1600296)

 

Zenith 5-R-216 (1938)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Zenith 5-R-216 (1938)

The Zenith "Cube" radios were very popular and great sellers for the company. They started a trend with other manufacturers producing their own cube radios. Silvertone, Stewart-Warner, Detrola and others all had their version of the cube. The cube design is still very popular with collectors today. Zenith had seven cube designs and the 216 was their entry level cube radio. A five-tube, AM-only AC set, it's still a very good radio with good sensitivity and volume. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked resistors and tubes, replacing where necessary. He added a new power cord, safety fuse and an audio cable to access an external device. He installed a new antenna wire. The cabinet was completely restored by Gary Marvin, and it's gorgeous. Most of Zenith's radios had "piano" lacquer finishes, and Gary did a great job recreating that "factory fresh" look on this cabinet. We have the original knobs, chassis and side-mounted speaker. Here is yet another Zenith "Cube" that belongs in someone's collection... could that be you? 12"H x 10"W x 9-1/2"D. Was $449.00, now $399.00. (1600267)

 

Zenith 5-S-319 "Racetrack" (1939)

Zenith 5-S-319 "Racetrack" (1939)

I've written about Zenith changing over from large tombstone and "Walton" type radios to a different look and approach at the end of the 1930's into the 1940's. The 5-S-319 was designed in 1938 for the 1939 model year and resembled their "cube" design, but certainly looked like a small version of the 1940 style table radio. The curved side-speaker grille and a more "rounded" design was a sign of things to come. The oval iconic "Racetrack" dial bezel to this day is still very collectable. The same radio chassis was also available in a small tombstone cabinet, and a chairside design. Our friend and talented radio repairman Todd Ommert replaced all of the capacitors. The tubes and resistors were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and audio cable were installed. The radio plays great, and the audio cable works quite well. Gary stripped, grain-filled, and painted the radio. He was able to save the original faux Zebrawood decal and finished with a "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, push buttons, chassis and dial scale. Here is a perfect example of the desirable "Racetrack" Zenith radio! 13"W x 9"H x 7-1/2"D. $749.00. (1600311)

 

Zenith 6-D-525 "Toaster" (1941)

Zenith 6-D-525 "Toaster" (1941)

Ah yes, the venerable Zenith "Toaster." Still highly collectable and a great functioning radio with a beautiful Ingraham cabinet. It's perfect as an entry level purchase to start your collection with. This six-tube, AM only radio has great volume and good sensitivity across the dial. The electronics were restored by a good friend of ours, and he dd a wonderful job! The capacitors have all been replaced. The tubes and resistors checked and replaced where necessary. He added a new power cord and I installed an MP3 cable. This radio has our guarantee and we will stand behind the workmanship. This particular Toaster has a gorgeous original finish with matching walnut burl on the front of the unique Ingraham cabinet. The original grille cloth was used, along with reproduction knobs, back and dial cover. A perfect, quality radio in every way, and priced to sell! 12"W x 7-1/2"H x 7"D. $399.00. (1600294)

 

Zenith 6-D-629 "Boomerang" (1942)

Zenith 6-D-629 "Boomerang" (1942)

Zenith designed a series of "Boomerang" radios, named for the dial design shaped like a boomerang. Philco also had their version of a "Boomerang" radio. With their model it was more about the cabinet design. Designed in wood and Bakelite by Robert Budlong, it was one of the last new radios produced before war production started in April of 1942. This series of radios was named "Consoltone." The 6-S-629 is a six-tube, AM only set. New for 1942, it also had the newly designed "wave magnet" loop antenna. We acquired the radio from the estate of a radio collector. The radio has been restored and we will guarantee the workmanship. The set performs well with good sensitivity and plenty of volume. I added an audio cable so external devices (Bluetooth, iPhone etc.) can be used. The beautiful walnut trimmed with mahogany cabinet was given a lacquer finish. The original knobs are present, and we installed a new reproduction grille cloth, as well as a new reproduction back. A really nice representation of a Zenith "Boomerang" and will give many years of listening pleasure! 14"W x 8-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D. $399.00. (1600302)

 

Zenith 6-S-223 (1938)

NEW!

Zenith 6-S-223 (1938)

The "Black Dial" addition to Zenith radios in 1936 was a defining moment for the company and for the radio industry at large. What a simple idea that is still popular to this day 84 years later. Zenith applied it to all sizes of their radios. Large, medium and small. The model 6-S-223 was a "medium" sized radio. This six-tube, three-band (SB,SW,Police) was next in the model line from the 6-S-222 "cube" and is basically a larger version of the "cube" utilizing the same chassis. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. He checked and replaced resistors and tubes where needed. He installed a jack for an audio cable, new power cord and a safety fuse. This is a great performing radio with plenty of volume and sensitivity across the dial. Gary stripped and refinished the Mahogany and Black Walnut cabinet with gorgeous maple sides. He ended up with a "factory fresh" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, speaker and chassis. Gary installed a reproduction grille cloth. This is a very rare Zenith. It sold for about 25% more that the "cube" which may explain why sales were slow for this larger radio. Here is a perfect example of this collectable radio! 19-1/2"W x 11-1/2"H x 10"D. $995.00. (1600323)

 

Zenith 6-S-254 (1938)

Zenith 6-S-254 (1938)

Zenith continued producing great radios in 1938. The introduction of "Walton" series radios, the first triangular dial; with seven-tube count and higher, radios included motorized tuning, eye tubes, and dial plates that changed with the waveband. The lower tube count radios didn't have any of those options, but offered a five-point tone control, bass boost, "split-second" tuning control and "tell-tale" controls. This six-tube, three-band radio was smaller than most consoles. Utilizing a ten-inch speaker, the radio has a lot of volume and very good adjustable fidelity. We replaced all of the capacitors, checked tubes and resistors and replaced them where necessary. A safety fuse and external cable we installed. We aligned the radio and it just flat-out performs. Gary stripped the cabinet and refinished it using high-quality paint, toner and lacquer for a "factory fresh" finish. Note the beautiful quilted maple strips. We used a period correct grille cloth and the wood Zenith knobs are original. This radio is gorgeous and a wonderful example of American quality craftsmanship from 1938! Packing and shipping by Greyhound is included in the asking price. 40"H x 24-1/2"W x 14"D. $1,199.00. (1600279)

 

Zenith 6-S-439 (1940)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Zenith 6-S-439 (1940)

In 1940, Zenith changed the cabinets and electronics of their radios. Cloth wire was replaced with rubber wire, and electronics were compacted into smaller chassis. The original big round dials of the mid to late '30s were replaced with a much more angular look. Art Deco was fading and the "Machine Age" had arrived. This particular radio used the same chassis and dial with six-, seven-, and eight-tube configurations. This six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) set was a good performer. It has surprising volume and fidelity for a table radio. Blake replaced all of the capacitors. Resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord and audio cable were installed. Gary stripped the walnut cabinet, and refinished using the best grain fillers and paint. He painstakingly painted in the gold stripes and black accent stripes. The radio has a beautiful lacquer finish. We installed a new grille cloth and a couple of the knobs are reproduction and look exactly like the originals. This is a good looking, good performing Zenith. 16"W x 9"H x 9-1/2"D. Was $549.00, now $499.00. (1600277)

 

Zenith 7-S-634 (1942)

ON SALE
until
December 1

Zenith 7-S-634 (1942)

The 1940-1942 Zenith table radios were a departure in design from previous years. They are all very collectable now, and most of them sound pretty darned good! The new "tone organ" tone selector with five choices that you can set in any configuration really helps the fidelity. They have surprisingly good bass response, due in part to the "boxy" cabinets. I have posted a 7-S-633, which uses the same chassis but different cabinet with a wrap-around grille. The 7-S-634 isn't as common. This is a seven-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) set. The newly designed "wave magnet" internal antenna loop works quite well. The radio has great sensitivity and volume across the dial. We went in and replaced all of the capacitors, checked all of the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. We did a bit of rewiring plus installation of an audio cable, safety fuse and new power chord. Gary did a fantastic job stripping and refinishing the mahogany cabinet to a "factory fresh" look. He skillfully applied lacquer for a "piano" luster. The radio look and plays great! Price includes shipping. 22"W x 11"H x 10"D. Was $749.00, now $699.00. (1600230)

 

Zenith 8-S-129 (1937)

Zenith 8-S-129 (1937)

Zenith had a lot of new features in the 1937 line, and the 8-S-129 had them all! Lightning Station Finder, Target Tuning, Split-Second Relocater, Privacy Plug-in, Metaglas (metal) Tubes, Acoustic adapter, Voice-Music-High Fidelity Control, and the infamous "Large Black Dial." The 8-S-129 is an eight-tube, three-band (SB,SW,Police) set. Blake replaced all of the capacitors, checked the resistors and tubes, replacing where needed. A new power cord, audio cable and safety fuse were added. The radio is a wonderful performer, showing great fidelity and volume through the original 8-inch speaker. Gary stripped the cabinet, and did his usual magic on the walnut and Australian Laurel side pieces. The radio retains it original knobs and a reproduction grille cloth was added. This stunningly beautiful and rare Zenith can be yours, but hurry as I don't think it will be around long. 23"H x 17"W x 14"D. $1,495.00. (1600239)

 

Zenith 8-S-548 Chairside (1941)

Zenith 8-S-548 Chairside (1941)

Chairside radios were designed to sit next to a person's favorite chair, allowing them to simply reach over to tune in a station. Zenith made several models of chairsides, and the eight-tube three-band (SB, 2xSW) 8-S-548 is a beautiful radio of style and design. Blake replaced all original paper capacitors with new Mylar coated capacitors of equal values. He checked and replaced resistors and tubes as needed, then aligned the set for peak performance. A fuse is added for safety. Gary has professionally refinished the cabinet to be showroom fresh and installed new Zenith grille cloth. 21"H x 27"W x 15"D. $895.00. (1600039)

 

Zenith 10-S-130 Tombstone (1937)

Zenith 10-S-130 Tombstone (1937)

The 10S130 was the top-of-the-line tombstone for the 1937 model year. Zenith's "big, black dial" was a huge success for them, and to this day they are still sought-after sets. The 1937 model line was known as "All Featured" because of the dozen features new to that year. A lot of new tuning aids and audio features along with new cabinet designs. The 10-S-130 is a ten-tube, four-band (SB,SWx2,Police) set with push-pull audio producing 12 watts of power. Blake replaced all of the capacitors with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes were checked and replaced where needed. A new power cord, MP3 cable and safety fuse were added. Gary Marvin is one of the best cabinet men in the country, and his artistry shows on this magnificent radio! He stripped the cabinet, and using the best grain fillers and toners, created a "factory fresh" look. He finished the radio with a few coats of lacquer, fine sanding and polishing to a gorgeous "piano" finish. The radio retains the original knobs, speaker and chassis. A period-correct reproduction grille cloth was installed. This is the second of two we have restored over the last year. This huge Zenith beauty is rare indeed! 22"H x 17"W x 12"D. $2,495.00. (1600293)

 

Zenith 705 (1934)

NEW!

Zenith 705 (1934)

In 1933, FDR had been elected president as the country was experiencing a severe depression. Unlike most companies, Zenith had a huge surplus of cash, and produced 125 models, the 200, 400, 500 and 600 model series for 1933, up from just 25 the year before. Several models were carried over to 1934, and the 700 series radios, called the "Challenger" series came out. The 705 is a six-tube, AM only, AC powered radio. This radio came from our friend and fellow restorer Todd Ommert. He replaced all of the capacitors, checked the tubes and resistors, replacing where necessary. He installed a new power cord, audio cable and a new antenna lead. The radio has good sensitivity across the dial and plays with good tone and plenty of volume. Gary stripped the burl walnut and mahogany cabinet. He ended up with a beautiful "piano" lacquer finish. The radio has the original knobs, dial scale, speaker and chassis. A beautiful "mantle" radio (Zenith didn't make many) to grace your collection. 15-1/2"W x 8-1/2"H x 7"D. $449.00. (1600314)

 

Zenith 805 (1935)

Zenith 805 (1935)

Zenith didn't make a lot of cathedral radios. They were late in the market as Philco had introduced their "Baby Grand" cathedral and became industry leaders with the design. The "Zenette" cathedrals helped the company out of some financial difficulties, but Zenith had few cathedrals and lagged behind other companies. The 805 was the last cathedral Zenith produced. This five-tube, two-band (SB,SW) set is a pretty good performer. Blake went in and replaced all of the capacitors. He checked all of the resistors and tubes, replacing where necessary. He installed a new cloth power cord. He replaced the dial belt and added an audio cable for an external device. The set has really nice fidelity and sensitivity across the dial. Gary stripped the cabinet and finished up with a semi-gloss, grain filled lacquer finish. The radio has original knobs and speaker, and we installed a reproduction grille cloth. You're not going to find a nicer 805! 13"W x 15"H x 9"D. $649.00. (1600254)

 

Zenith 908 Tombstone (1935)

NEW!

Zenith 908 Tombstone (1935)

The Zenith 908 is a very rare radio. To be honest, I wasn't even aware of them till this one popped up. Manufactured late in 1934 for the 1935 model year, it didn't even make an appearance till February of 1935. Slow sales doomed it for a very short run, and Zenith halted production shortly after its debut. The 908 is a six-tube, three-band (SB,SWx2) radio. The 1935 radios were great playing sets. The 809, 829 and 835 chrome fronts were a huge success for Zenith, also contributing to the slow sales of the 908. The radio has had all of the capacitors replaced with new equivalents. The resistors and tubes have been checked and replaced where needed. We installed a new power cord, audio cable and aligned the radio. It has excellent sensitivity across the dial with plenty of volume through the 8" speaker. Gary meticulously refinished the walnut cabinet with gorgeous burl walnut veneer on the front. He applied several coats of lacquer and hand-polished to a "piano" finish. The radio has the correct knobs (without the "Z"), original grille cloth and speaker. If you would like a rare Zenith for your collection that no one else has, then this is your radio! 18"H x 14-1/2"W x 9-1/2"D. $1,499.00. (1600318)

 

Zenith Royal 1000 "Trans-Oceanic" (1958)

NEW!

Zenith Royal 1000 "Trans-Oceanic" (1958)

These radios were conceived in 1942 by Commander Eugene F. McDonald, president of Zenith. He wanted a portable radio he could use on his boat for entertainment, news, weather, marine shortwave as well as international stations. The Trans-Oceanic was a hit, and Zenith produced them from 1942 to 1981. The Royal 1000 is a seven-band (SB,SWx6) nine-transistor radio. It is the first "solid state" Trans-Oceanic. We checked out the transistors. We replaced all of the capacitors and checked the resistors. The controls have been cleaned and lubricated. The leather protective case is soft and pliable with all of the stitching intact. The original logs and chart are present and unmarked. A twelve volt adapter has been added in place of the battery box. The internal antenna and the hard-to-find remote antenna is included. This radio was owned by Capt. Robert A. Hunt when he was stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington and is clearly the cleanest Royal 1000 we have ever seen! 13"W x 10"H x 5"D. $349.00. (1600315)
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About Joe's Radio Shop

Shipping

At Joe's Radio Shop we do everything in our power to make sure our radios are packed with the utmost of care and protection.  We use double-sided boxes lined with Styrofoam creating a box within a box.  The radio has bubble wrap placed inside to protect the tubes, then double wrapped in bubble wrap and placed on packing peanuts on the bottom of the box.  The sides around the bubble wrapped radio are filled with packing peanuts and a piece of Styrofoam is placed on top of the radio and the box is then sealed.  Our larger radios and consoles have the speakers removed and are professionally packed by Diversified Packing and shipped via Greyhound.  We have never had any damage to any of our shipped radios.  We will ship radios with the company that offers the best rate; Fed-Ex, UPS, USPS and DHL are the preferred carriers.  Let us know if you have a preference for shipping.  Packages are shipped within three business days of payment.  Consoles and large radios may take a little longer due to a more involved packing process.  Tracking numbers will be provided to you, and we track the packages as well.

Payment

Joe's Radio Shop accepts payment through PayPal, credit cards (we use the Square, which requires a 3.75% fee) and checks.  Payment plus shipping must be deposited before we ship your radio to you.  Checks must clear our bank before shipping.  Joe's Radio Shop will not provide or sell your personal information to anyone.  Credit card information is shredded and discarded after the charge is made and deposited.  Upon ordering, you will receive an invoice via email with cost plus shipping charges.  A receipt will arrive with the radio.

Don't like the price? Give us an offer!

Joe's Radio Shop return policy:

We accept returns, but we would first try to resolve any issues and make sure your radio is functioning as it should.  A few guidelines for vintage tube radios to function properly:
1. Most radios need an antenna to function properly.  10-20 feet of wire connected to the "A" lug in the back of the chassis, which we will provide to you.  Some radios have internal antennas, or "loops."  For the most part, these radios should receive broadcast or "AM" stations in your area.
2. Multiple band radios that have 1-3 short wave bands will also need plenty of antenna.  There isn't much going on these day with short wave.  Many short wave stations have moved to satellite or the internet.  There are a few out there, and a good antenna is needed.  Ask us about antennas; we can describe how to make them to use at your home.  Try to place your radio on an outside wall, the reception will be better, especially with console radios.  Police and aviation (now UHF) bands no longer function in today's world.
3. There are things in a household that can cause static and interference.  Computers, fluorescent lighting, lighting potentiometers (dimmer switch), microwave ovens, digital TV and possibly your wi-fi system.  Try to keep the radio out of proximity to these devices.
4. Running the radio for long periods of time can can them to overheat causing damage.

Please contact us within seven days for a possible return.  E-mail us at joesradioshop1@gmail.com or phone us at 503-209-8414.  Our radios come with a six  month guarantee from the purchase date.  Any electrical damage or failure will be repaired free of cost minus materials and shipping.  If there is damage from shipping, the claim has to go through the shipper.  If we determine the damage is the shipper or buyers fault, we can negotiate a repair price.  If an issue can't be resolved to the buyer's liking, we will offer a full refund minus shipping and insurance.  If the buyer pays the shipper directly, the buyer assumes all responsibility for insurance settlements due to damage while in transit.  When shipping a radio back to us, please follow our packing guidelines listed under Shipping.  If the radio is improperly packed, the refund will be denied.



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