Rich Rodger's Radio Attic
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the Radio Attic

Medina, OH 44256
330-858-0077

   

Click on the link above or call to contact me, or e-mail rodgers@radioattic.com.
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I've been an avid collector of antique radios for nearly 20 years.  Most of my collection consists of wood radios from the 1930's but I also own a number of Bakelite, transistor and battery powered sets.  I also have an assortment of cone and horn speakers along with wire loop antennas from the 1920's.  As I approach retirement, it's time to start downsizing and giving others a chance to enjoy these remarkable pieces of history.  You are welcome to personally inspect the radios I sell if you're in the Northeast Ohio area.
 

 

Arvin 444 (1946)

Arvin 444 (1946)

Immediately after WWII, almost everyone could afford a radio and demand was sky high. Arvin fulfilled a need for inexpensive radios meant for playing in secondary areas of the home such as the kitchen or a bedroom. This pint sized metal radio isn't much taller than a 12-oz can of Coke, yet it plays as well as you would expect for an inexpensive little portable. Most of these were quickly tossed in the trash or neglected once transistor radios came along, so finding one in such great shape is impossible. There are a few little scrapes (see the left front edge) but it's one of the nicest examples I've ever seen. Touch it up or leave it as-is. A prior owner restored it. 6-1/2"W x 6"H x 5"D.  $119.00. (1340028)

 

Automatic C-60X Suitcase Portable (1947)

Automatic C-60X Suitcase Portable (1947)

Here's another example of a nice "suitcase style" portable tube radio from the early 1940's. These were popular for use at the beach, on a picnic or for the home. Imagine the families who depended on them for the latest news developments and entertainment. Untested, for display or restoration purposes. 12-1/2"W x 9-3/4"H x 5-1/4"D.  $89.00. (1340057)

 

DeWald 550 "Dynette" (1933)

DeWald 550 "Dynette" (1933)

This lovely little mantel radio was sold as a very inexpensive "mantel" or "midget" radio during the Great Depression. These compact radios sold like crazy because they delivered high style, moderate performance and low pricing. Examine the flowered detail of the knobs alone and think about the pride a family would take in owning this radio. Sadly, many of these radios were neglected or quickly discarded with the advent of cheap transistor radios. This one has been restored but the resistance line cord is original. 10-1/2"W x 7-1/2"H x 6"D.  $149.00. (1340033)

 

Emerson Auxiliary Speaker

Emerson Auxiliary Speaker

This is a darling little Emerson Auxiliary Speaker that was meant to boost the sound of a transistor radio or add "surround sound" to a phonograph player. I don't know the model name so let's just call it the "Super Neat-O." It looks like new in its perfect cream Plaskon cabinet and outstanding grille cloth. It has a nice little plug and sounds pretty darn good when attached to the earphone jack of a little radio. It even has a cute little retractable carry handle. This is the perfect addition your vintage transistor radio or phonograph.  $89.00. (1340025)

 

Firestone Air Chief S-7403-9 (1940)

Firestone Air Chief S-7403-9 (1940)

Firestone sold a lot of radios and other appliances in their tire stores located in rural areas. This fine example retains its original finish with breathtaking veneers. It's been well treated in the past because the knob decals show little wear from normal use. The colorful dial and bullet style knobs add to the charm of this radio. Imagine a family gathered around this radio listening intently for updates on WWII developments! I acquired this radio from the famous "Radiophile" collection (do a Google search to read more about this radio). They performed an excellent electronic restoration. 17"W x 15-1/2"H x 9-1/2"D.   $279.00. (1340004)

 

General Electric HB-402 Suitcase Portable (1939)

General Electric HB-402 Suitcase Portable (1939)

Here's another example of a nice "suitcase style" portable tube radio from the early 1940's. These were popular for use at the beach, on a picnic or for the home. Imagine the families who depended on them for the latest news developments and entertainment. Rare "beetle plastic" knobs in nice shape. Untested, for display or restoration purposes. 13"W x 9-1/2"H x 4-1/2"D.  $79.00. (1340060)

 

Philco 37-600 (1937)

Philco 37-600 (1937)

Philco introduced their entry level 37-600 for the low, low price of just $25. Who could resist the lovely, streamlined faux finish front? This interesting radio has a full wood back so the chassis is mounted from the bottom. It even looks cool from the rear side and you can't say that about too many radios! It's been restored and plays OK but these were not high performance radios when new. The plastic dial lens is cracked. 12-1/2"W x 8-1/2"H x 7-1/2"D.  $179.00. (1340035)

 

Philco PT-87 Suitcase Portable (1941)

Philco PT-87 Suitcase Portable (1941)

Here's another example of a nice "suitcase style" portable tube radio from the early 1940's. These were popular for use at the beach, on a picnic or for the home. Imagine the families who depended on them for the latest news developments and entertainment. Untested, for display or restoration purposes. 11"W x 10"H x 5-1/2"D.  $89.00. (1340058)

 

Silvertone 4500 "Election" (1936)

Silvertone 4500 "Election" (1936)

This streamlined Bakelite beauty was manufactured for Sears & Roebuck by Colonial Radio. Sears claimed this radio took first prize, as an object of "outstanding beauty," in the nationwide Modern Plastics Competition, held in New York City. It was nicknamed the "Election Model" because it was advertised as ideal for use in listening to broadcasts of the 1936 presidential election, held on November 3 and won overwhelmingly by the incumbent Franklin Roosevelt. This little beauty has just had a fresh electronic restoration for years of listening pleasure. A new line cord and antenna are included.  $159.00. (1340029)

 

Sonora KB-73 Suitcase Portable (1939)

Sonora KB-73 Suitcase Portable (1939)

Here's another example of a nice "suitcase style" portable tube radio from the early 1940's. These were popular for use at the beach, on a picnic or for the home. Imagine the families who depended on them for the latest news developments and entertainment. Untested, for display or restoration purposes. 14-1/4"W x 10"H x 6-1/4"D.  $89.00. (1340059)

 

Stewart Warner 1671 (1937)

Stewart Warner 1671 (1937)

Radio collectors tend to love bright, colorful dials with a streamlined appearance. Carefully examine the Art Deco look of this great dial and you'll want it for yourself. The rounded and sculpted cabinet match it perfectly. This is simply a great little radio that's had an electronic and cabinet restoration so grab it before it gets away. 14"W x 9-1/2"H x 8-1/2"D.  $229.00. (1340038)
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Policies:

I will hold a radio for five (5) calendar days for the first buyer to send an email expressing their intention to purchase the radio.  If payment is not received in full within five (5) calendar days, it is eligible to be sold to any other potential buyer.  I do not accept partial payments, deposits or monthly payment plans.

I want you to be 100% satisfied with your new radio.  If a buyer is not satisfied with a radio, for any reason, they have seven (7) calendar days after delivery to contact me by email.  If a buyer wants a full purchase price refund, the radio must be returned in as-sold condition.  Any returned item must be carefully packed, shipped at the buyer's expense and fully insured for the original purchase price.  The buyer must promptly return the radio so it is received by the seller within fifteen (15) calendar days after it was initially delivered to the buyer.  The seller will refund the full purchase price within seven (7) calendar days after the radio is received and inspected if these conditions are satisfied.

All packing, shipping and insurance costs are paid by the buyer.  My radios are professionally packed at the local FedEx or UPS Business Center.  The added cost for professional packing generally ranges from $12 to $25 depending on the size, shape and weight of the radio.  Brand new boxes and packing materials that are properly sized for your radio will minimize the potential for shipping damages.  While other sellers may do a wonderful job packing a radio, I strongly feel these antique instruments deserve to be properly packed by shipping professionals using brand new materials.  There is absolutely nothing worse than destroying a beautiful piece of history with incorrect packing materials, careless workmanship or ill-fitting boxes.  As with all things in life, you get exactly what you pay for and full-time professionals typically do better work than amateur packers.

Depending on the package size, distance and weight, your radio will be shipped via FedEx, UPS or USPS Parcel Select.  If your radio is damaged in shipping and you request a refund, you may have to take the radio and all of the original packaging to your FedEx, UPS or Post Office location for inspection.  This is FedEx, UPS and USPS policy.  In certain cases, the shipping carrier may retrieve the radio and packing materials from your home upon request.  International shipping is by prior arrangement only.  I charge my exact costs for packing, shipping and insurance--no added fees.

Payment Options:
1) Money Order or Bank Cashiers Check.
2) PayPal funded from your checking account or PayPal balance only.  No credit card payments of any kind through PayPal unless you absorb all fees.
3) Personal checks (must clear prior to shipping).
4) Cash (in-person local pickup).

Click here to see the radios I sold in the last twelve months.

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