Tom Albrecht's Radio and TV Attic

the Radio Attic 6469 Oberlin Way
San Jose, CA 95123
408-425-1578
   
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General Electric H600 (1939)

General Electric H600 (1939)

This early Bakelite radio from General Electric was one of the first of a wave of Bakelite table sets that would become the most popular style of radio for the next decade and a half. The rounded shape, ribbed sides, and complex louvered speaker grille demonstrated the versatility of molded plastic. The ivory knobs add a nice accent to the appearance. Unlike most later Bakelite sets, this one has an elaborately molded Bakelite rear cover as well. The six-tube chassis also set a trend with its built-in loop antenna. The sixth tube in this set is not an RF amplifier stage, but rather an extra audio amplifier stage incorporating feedback for reduced distortion, higher fidelity, and very low hum (this radio was designed for both 25 and 60 cycle AC). Sensitivity and sound quality are excellent. Chassis restoration included replacement of all electrolytic and paper capacitors, new resistors where needed, a strong set of tubes, and rewiring of the switch and grounding circuitry for improved safety with the new polarized power cord. Lighted dial. New reproduction dial (I'll give you the original as well). 10-1/4"W x 7-1/4"H x 7-1/2"D.  $175.00. (1310079)

 

General Electric H620 AM/SW (1939)

General Electric H620 AM/SW (1939)

This General Electric is the "big brother" (with pushbuttons and short wave) of the H600 I listed recently. The Bakelite cabinet is free of cracks and chips, and unlike most Bakelite radios, it has a molded Bakelite back. The six-tube (plus ballast tube) chassis uses the sixth tube for an extra audio gain stage with feedback to reduce distortion and improve fidelity. Sensitivity and sound quality are excellent. Chassis restoration included replacement of all electrolytic and paper capacitors, new resistors where needed, a strong set of tubes, a full alignment, a new polarized power cord, and rewiring of the switch and grounding circuitry for improved safety. Lighted dial. The dial scale is a modern reproduction (I will give you the original as well, which is not in particularly bad shape). 10-1/4"W x 7-1/2"H x 7-1/4"D.  $185.00. (1310080)

 

General Electric J-82 Cathedral

General Electric J-82 Cathedral

Now that's a real cathedral! The Gothic arch profile and grille make this General Electric a particularly compelling example of cathedral radio design. The original finish on this cabinet is very nice (not perfect, but surprisingly good), with very little fading of the original toner patterns. The original grille cloth has retained its color quite well. Someone took good care of this radio over its 85 year life. Can you do the same? The eight tube chassis is an earlier version than is usually found in the J-82. It is a superhet, with superb sensitivity and selectivity, but it lacks an AVC and uses the more primitive triode detector of early 1930s radios, with a sound quality and behavior a little different than later radios. You'll enjoy seeing how it compares with newer radios in your collection. Chassis restoration included replacement of all paper and electrolytic capacitors, new resistors throughout, a strong set of tubes, replacement of deteriorated wiring, addition of a fuse (for improved safety), and a better-than-factory RF/IF alignment for top performance. The previously replaced vintage-style power cord and plug are in good shape. 19"H x 14"W x 11"D.  $535.00. (1310067)

 

Realistic MTA-11 AM/FM (1981)

NEW!

Realistic MTA-11 AM/FM (1981)

The condition of this Realistic AM/FM table radio is about as close to brand new as they get. It's clean as a whistle, and has only one very small scratch on the front trim. Chrome on the knobs is perfect. Although it came to me in excellent working condition, I've replaced the electrolytic caps throughout to get it ready for its next 37 years of service. This was a good quality radio in its day, with a 6-1/2" speaker with a fairly large ceramic magnet, and a three-stage FM IF with ceramic filter. Sensitivity, selectivity, and sound quality are excellent. Built-in antennas for AM and FM are provided; there are also terminals for a 300 ohm external FM antenna. Compact and lightweight, so shipping will be inexpensive. 13-1/2"W x 8-1/2"H x 4-1/2"D.  $75.00. (1310082)

 

Sony STR-6065 AM/FM Stereo Receiver (1971-74)

NEW!

Sony STR-6065 AM/FM Stereo Receiver (1971-74)

Remember how you used to enjoy visiting stereo stores in the 1970s, wishing you could buy the latest equipment? Japanese stereo receivers like this Sony STR-6065 are well engineered and beautifully constructed, with extruded aluminum panels and fancy knobs, controls that have a quality "feel" and the best technology available in their day. This solid-state model has 50 watts RMS per channel with 0.2% distortion, which is enough to blow the doors off your house. You won't find one cleaner than this--it's almost like new. Although this came to me fully operational, I've prepared it for its next 40+ years of service by replacing all 70(!) electrolytic capacitors, cleaning all controls and contacts, replacing bad bulbs with LEDs, and giving it a full RF and IF alignment for both AM and FM, so it performs as well as the day it was made. Sensitivity, stereo separation, and overall sound quality are superb. Lighted dial, tuning meter, and stereo indicator are all working properly. 17-1/2"W x 5-3/4"H x 14"D.  $345.00. (1310083)

 

Zenith 6-D-315 "Bullet" (1938)

NEW!

Zenith 6-D-315 "Bullet" (1938)

The "Bullet" is viewed as one of Zenith's most attractive Bakelite table radios. In 1938, this curvy sculpted design was a stylish statement of what could be done with molded plastic materials. This one is in beautiful condition, with an original Bakelite shine that has not been augmented with polishing or clearcoating. Its only defect is a crack in one of the curved grille louvers (see left side picture). This radio was technically innovative in its day; the thick back cover encloses a shielded loop antenna that Zenith marketed as the "Wave Magnet." Shielded loops, although common on consoles, were rare on table radios, and are the best type of antenna for noisy environments. The chassis has had a full electrical restoration with strong tubes, all paper and electrolytic capacitors replaced, new resistors where needed, and a full alignment. It also has a badly needed safety upgrade with its hot chassis (and exposed bolts on the bottom!) now converted to the much safer floating ground system used by most other AC/DC radios. A new polarized power cord and changes to the power switch wiring further enhance safety. Lighted dial. 11"W x 6"H x 9"D.  $295.00. (1310081)

 

Zenith 712 "Challenger Line" (1933)

Zenith 712 "Challenger Line" (1933)

Here's an opportunity to own one of these much-sought-after early Zeniths at an affordable price. The ornate cabinet features elaborate scrollwork, raised flourishes, and patterned inlays. This cabinet was refinished by a previous owner and has a nice satin finish which was applied in many coats. It lacks the original burl pattern on the front crest, and the original brass "Zenith" nameplate has been replaced with a decal. Knobs and grille cloth appear to be replacements. The six-tube chassis is a superheterodyne design with AVC, a shadow meter (the left window on the front) and diode detector for low distortion, so it had all the newest technology for 1933. My electrical restoration included all new capacitors, new resistors where needed, a strong set of tubes, and a full RF and IF alignment. The original power cord is in good enough shape to continue using (a rare find!), but if you prefer a new one, I will install at no extra cost. Sensitivity and sound quality are excellent. Lighted dial and shadow meter. 14-1/2"W x 14-1/2"H x 8-1/2"D.  $375.00. (1310066)
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  TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE

  • Payment by PayPal preferred; money orders and checks also accepted (checks must clear before shipping).

  • Actual shipping costs are paid by buyer. Contact me to determine shipping cost to your address. Shipping overseas is possible, but the customer must be willing to pay for shipping services with delivery verification and insurance. All radios are shipped double boxed, insured, with delivery verification.

  • An audio input jack can be provided on any of the radios I sell at no extra charge if you request it, and a Bluetooth adaptor can be installed for $25.

  • All radios and televisions are electrically restored by me. I have many years experience and have restored hundreds of vintage radios, TVs, phonographs, and stereos. If your radio or TV arrives dead or fails within the first 60 days of normal use (and no internal modifications made by the buyer), I will repair for free. Shipping costs for U.S. and Canadian customers for repairs in the first 60 days are split (you pay for shipping to me, I pay for return shipping to you). After 60 days, normal repair and shipping fees (both ways) will apply, although my charges are very reasonable. For customers outside the U.S. and Canada, the customer must pay shipping both ways for repairs, even for those within the first 60 days.

  • If you are unsatisfied with your purchase for any reason, please contact me and I will do my very best to make things right.

Click here to see the radios I sold in the last twelve months.

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